Being a Teacher/Alternative Certification

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by futureteacher13, May 23, 2014.

  1. futureteacher13

    futureteacher13 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    6

    May 23, 2014

    I have been a Teacher Assistant for nearly 5 years!

    I want to become a teacher. My Bachelor of Arts degree is in a different area, which is Social Science with Education Concentration. Even though I'm a teacher assistant, I'm NOT naive to the realities of education. Even with the ever present changes, I still want to teach.

    I want to be an elementary school or junior high school teacher for 6th grade. Even though I didn't go through the traditional education route, I feel I'm gaining valuable experience.

    I work well with students, I love working with children, seeing them grow from one year to the next, and that's why I want to be a teacher!

    In order for me to certify in Elementary Education, I have to take 2 additional education courses, pass the GK, SAE, and PEd, and teach for 1 year!

    What's your take on teachers completing alternative routes to completing teacher certification?

    My passion is to teach!
     
  2.  
  3. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,642
    Likes Received:
    207

    May 24, 2014

    I completed an alternative certification process, was hired in a tight job market, and have had a successful career. The principal who hired me commented that she thought my prior job experience and maturity (I wasn't 22), would be an asset.
     
  4. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,248
    Likes Received:
    785

    May 24, 2014

    As a general rule, I'm not a fan of alternate route teaching certificate programs, because they don't give would-be teachers actual time in the classroom.

    However, you won't have that problem. If anything, you'll have spent more time in the classroom than most traditional route teachers... so go out there, get your certificate, and do great things :)
     
  5. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 4, 2012
    Messages:
    332
    Likes Received:
    48

    May 24, 2014

    You have five years of experience in the classroom. That is way more valuable than if you had majored in education IMO. There is nothing wrong with going the alternative route. Not everyone knows what they want to do at 18 and it gives people who have been out in the workforce an opportunity to go back and teach if they find it is their passion.
     
  6. Mrs.DLC

    Mrs.DLC Comrade

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    319
    Likes Received:
    1

    May 24, 2014

    I would go for it!! One of my daughters went that route and is an awesome teacher.(Has won TOY awards at 2 different schools.) I know many teachers who went the traditional route don't like the alt. cert. route, but I feel that personality, willingness to learn, common sense,work ethic, etc., are just as important.(I have worked with many traditional route teachers who were not very effective, and some alt. cert. who were great.) I am not trying to start a debate, but that has been my experience. You'll have that classroom experience as a plus. Good luck.
     
  7. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

    Joined:
    May 1, 2010
    Messages:
    807
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 24, 2014

    I've always been a little jealous of those who went the alt certification route. :p About 50% of my core education classes cost money out of my pocket for learning centers I never used and presentations, and then I had do to TONS of work and spend money on that stupid portfolio that nobody wanted to see! And then the gazillion hours of observations I had to juggle with work and classes.

    In all seriousness, it sounds like you'll do fine. I know three people who are alt certified. One has a degree in psychology, one in exercise something or other, and I can't remember about the other one. None of them had trouble finding a job.

    Good luck!

    Beth
     
  8. FaithDriven

    FaithDriven Rookie

    Joined:
    May 7, 2014
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 24, 2014

    I am kind of in the same boat. I am a teacher's aide and tutor looking to become a teacher. I love working in the classroom and have gained so much experience. My degree is in psychology so I did an alternative certification online for a different state (Texas). I am still looking and hopeful. I have had 3 offers for interviews so far. Part of my issue is being out of state but I do know its possible to get hired. I know some people that got jobs through ACP. If that's your passion, I say go for it! I know I'm not giving up :)
     
  9. missrebecca

    missrebecca Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    9

    May 24, 2014

    In my area, going the alternative route means you work in high poverty areas with very little training. I have a friend who started teaching middle school in an alternative program, and she has some horror stories... she quit and wound up completing a master's degree to be a teacher instead!

    I can see how the alternative route doesn't prepare you the same way... you probably won't get an internship and student teaching experience before you're "thrown to the wolves." But your experience in the classroom is a HUGE advantage.

    At the end of the day, it's ultimately up to YOU what kind of teacher you will be. :)
     
  10. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,642
    Likes Received:
    207

    May 24, 2014

    My program included 120 hours of observation and 12 weeks of student teaching!
     
  11. futureteacher13

    futureteacher13 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    6

    May 24, 2014

    I want to get a Master of Education degree in Elementary Education after about 3-4 years of teaching experience under my belt.
     
  12. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,248
    Likes Received:
    785

    May 24, 2014

    Just be warned that going back to school is a pain in the keister once you start teaching. Also make sure you know the certification rules in your state. A lot of states require you to have your master's within five years of getting your certificate, so if you plan on getting your master's within 4, you're cutting it a little close.
     
  13. futureteacher13

    futureteacher13 Rookie

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2013
    Messages:
    94
    Likes Received:
    6

    May 24, 2014

    I live in Florida. In order to achieve a professional teaching certificate in FL, you have to pass the state exams, complete additional courses (depending on the certification/subject area), and complete 1 successful year of teaching.

    As for achieving a Master's degree, I want to start working on that between my 5th or 6th year of teaching. I want to have a minimum of 3 to 5 years underneath my belt before I starting working on an advanced degree. I know it's going to be hard work, but with God all things are possible! :)
     
  14. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    May 24, 2014

    My thought on alternative routes has always been "In such a competitive market, why would an administrator want to hire someone who completed a fast track program over someone who went to school for 4-5 years, and majored in education?" I have never been part of an interview team where a principal chose to interview someone who went through alternative training.

    However, Missy brings up a great point. Plus, you do have a lot of classroom experience, which I'm sure is helpful.
     
  15. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2004
    Messages:
    3,642
    Likes Received:
    207

    May 25, 2014


    Maybe my program was different than others. We took education courses for two semesters (and people who needed any content courses took those) and did our observation hours during those semesters. The following year we student taught from beginning of the year to around Thanksgiving. Everyone already had at least a Bachelor's in something else.

    No offense to the education majors, but content knowledge is so important. The education courses were VERY helpful, but also seemed very easy.

    My district probably has at least 25% alternative cert teachers and our area is flooded with certified teachers.
     
  16. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4,248
    Likes Received:
    785

    May 25, 2014

    Content knowledge is a much bigger factor at the high school level. I'd expect anyone with a bachelor's degree to have pretty much all the basic content knowledge they'd need to teach elementary school, with the possible exception of 4th grade Social Studies (which tends to be state history-specific). Elementary teachers need to know children and how they learn.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Backroads,
  2. bella84,
  3. QueenBee4th,
  4. YoungTeacherGuy,
  5. Tnteacher2,
  6. vickilyn
Total: 394 (members: 11, guests: 359, robots: 24)
test