behaviour management ideas

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by limaca, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. limaca

    limaca Rookie

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    Aug 3, 2006

    I am looking for some suggestions regarding behaviour management. I plan on implementing an incentive/reward program for the whole class. I am also looking for a system that will address inappropriate and unacceptable behaviour. I have read a lot of information on this and most of it seems to go against putting names on the board with strikes etc. because it centers out the child. This can backfire if the students thrives on this type of attention. It also can harm the child's dignity and then you can lose the teacher-child relationship that I feel is essential for success.
    If I am not going to use a system that has children standing out then what kind of system can I use that will work. I was thinking of keeping the student who is misbehaving in at recess and having them write definitions of words from the dictionary. These would be words that relate to the student's problem area (eg. respect, consideration, etc.) Then I would have the student use that word in an apology note. The note would be photocopied and sent home.
     
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  3. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Aug 4, 2006

    Each of my students will have an half envelope that they've decorated and I've glued onto a poster board. Inside each envelope (can use library pockets too) there will be 5 green sticks (can use cards too). Each child will always get a warning for misbehavior but the second time he/she will be asked to remove a green stick from pocket. At the end of the week, each child will get a hole punched on his/her punch card for how ever many green sticks are left in his/her pocket on Friday. So, if she has 5 sticks, I will punch out 5 dots on her punch card. Whenever the punch card is completed, that will earn him/her a reward such as a treasure chest dig.

    I decided to try and focus on positive and that is why I have not added a yellow or red stick. But, I do have those for major misbehaviors.
     
  4. Jaicie

    Jaicie Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2006

    Get the book Teaching with Love and Logic by Jim Fay and Foster Cline. It's awesome! Students are not humiliated at all. They learn (with your guidance) to solve their own problems and come up with appropriate consequences that are acceptable to you as the teacher. Students are given many choices in the classroom, which gives them ownership. Another main focus of Love and Logic is building positive relationships with your students from day 1. Get to know them well, greet them at the door every day, find out what their interests and hobbies are, smile a lot, use please and thank you often (... just a few examples ...).

    Using Love and Logic with my 1st and 2nd graders has completely changed my teaching for the better. I no longer become angry with students. Instead, I'm sad when they misbehave, and they see my sadness. I don't need a card-pulling system, point chart, traffic light system, or anything. I enjoy being with my students, and they like and respect each other and me. By they way, I'm the only teacher in my school who uses Love and Logic, and my principal supports me fully. We have a school-wide discipline plan that I follow with the Love and Logic method in my classroom.

    ~ Jaicie :)
     
  5. jitterbug2

    jitterbug2 Rookie

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    Aug 4, 2006

    Also look into Assertive Discipline. It really shows you how to handle things without embarrassing your children. For instance, you keep a private clipboard with the children's names on it. Each time you have to reprimand a child you mark his/her name and let them know how many marks they have. Then, each mark represents something. For instance, one is a warning, two is a short time-out, etc. It also says that you shouldn't take away recess; but do a "time-out" at the back of the room or something. The discipline should be immediate so that the child knows exactly what they are being punished for and why. While they are in "time-out" they fill out a reflection form explaining what rule they chose to break, what they did wrong, and what they should have done instead. This could also be sent home for a parent signature if needed.
     
  6. corps2005

    corps2005 Cohort

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    Aug 4, 2006

    I use the flip color system, where the children flip their colors. In that system, there is also a Privledge card. When they lose that card, they lose their job for the day and any other class privledges.

    Incentives?
    Compliment Chain: everytime your class gets a compliment from another teacher, you add a link to the chain. It starts at the ceiling and comes down. When it touches the floor, they can have popcorn or something of your choosing.

    Mystery Person: I chose a mystery person, from my cup, at the beginning of the day and I watch their behavior. Now, normally, I look at the classes overall behavior not just the mystery person (but the class thinks I'm only looking at one person). If the class did good, I tell them who the mystery person is and he/she gets special homework like a word search. If they didn't do that good, then they don't get to find out who the mystery person is. They love it :p

    I also use table points and a kernel jar (others use a marble jar).
     
  7. limaca

    limaca Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2006

    Thank you for all of your suggestions. Is there a website for Love and Logic and Assertive Discipline? With the Love and Logic, what types of things do you do to correct misbehaviour?
    I like the idea of not taking away recess with the Assertive Discipline. I always run into problems with keeping them in at recess because I need to do things at recess and you cannot leave them in the room unattended. So I end up paying a price as well. Also, I know they need to run around and get rid of energy etc.
     
  8. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 5, 2006


    Forgive me for butting in where I don't belong. I teach HS, and the approaches are different. But I have to agree with your statement!

    It has always seemed to me that an overactive child who hasn't had recess is just going to be more hyper as the day goes on. :eek: It's setting him up for more trouble. I have never understood why it's used as a disciplinary tool.
     
  9. zoerba

    zoerba Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2006

    What other types of consequences would you recommend for a 2/3 grade class besides taking away portions of recess?
     
  10. jitterbug2

    jitterbug2 Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2006

    I use a "time out" system. I have a desk at the back of the room where they have to sit for so many minutes. And don't let them take their work with them! If you make them miss a few minutes of classwork, then they know that you mean business! Have them make up any work they may have missed for homework. I don't have them sit for that long anyway. Maybe 4 minutes the first time (after a warning of course) and 8 min. for the second. And have them fill out a form saying what they chose to do wrong and what they should have done instead. For older kids (4/5 grade) I like to make them write a letter. The first time, the letter is written to me apologizing for the wrong choices they made and for interrupting our classtime and letting me know what they will do if the event arises again (how their behavior will change). The second time, they write the letter to their parents, explaining everything they did in class. I think it has a huge effect on the kids if they have to be the one that writes the note home rather than the teacher.
     
  11. jitterbug2

    jitterbug2 Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2006

    zoerba, you could also use incentive programs with certain children that work great to help with their behavior. For instance, I had one child that could not stay on task or keep her desk clean for anything! Every monday, I would put 5 sticky notes on the side of her desk. If she was caught doing off task or with a messy area, I would pull off a sticky note. (This way, too, she could see how many she still had.) At the end of Friday, if she still had sticky notes on her desk then we would plan to have lunch together the following Monday. This worked so well!! If the children know that their behavior is going to make them miss out on something special just for them, they are less likely to act out.
     
  12. zoerba

    zoerba Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2006

    Good ideas! Jitterbug, I like the idea of the sticky notes. It doesn't take a lot of prep or management on your part, focuses on reinforcement, and sounds effective!
     
  13. jeanie

    jeanie Companion

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    Aug 5, 2006

    There is a website for Love and Logic... www.loveandlogic.com. I purchased the book Teaching with Love and Logic, recently.
     

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