Behaviour Management For 3 Year Olds

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by astaevia, Jan 31, 2008.

  1. astaevia

    astaevia Rookie

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    Jan 31, 2008

    Hi Everyone!

    I have just started my first teaching job and am with the 3- 3.5 year old age group in a kindergarten/preschool setting. this is very new to me (the ages) as I have found it to be a big difference from primary school and prep school to kindergarten.

    I need some assistance RE behaviour management tactics to stop them talking, wriggling, getting up etc. This is all happening during carpet times. Their listening skills don't seem to be in tact yet either and they just do not seem to want to listen to anything. HELP PLEASE!!!!!!!!!!!! :help:

    I also have a deaf boy in my class with cochlear ear aids. He has his good days but on his bad days he is very disruptive and growls, squeals, snatches toys etc. When I go to put him in the thinking chair he runs away from me all around the classroom and if I grab him he squeals the place down. :(

    My days have become very long because of these things so any help at all would be much appreciated. :2up:

    Thank you!
     
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  3. Budaka

    Budaka Cohort

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    Jan 31, 2008

    I think you need some big time practicing lessons. Have them practice sitting down quietly and moving quietly. I use to teach Spanish to a special needs three year old class. At first I thought their teacher was kind of mean but then I realized she was kind of good! They need a lot of structure. I know they have a lot of songs and rhymes they sing- crisscross-apple sauce for sitting down, something about bubbles on your lips for not talking etc? Then every pre-k class I have ever heard of has some sort of behaviour system- after some many stars you could a prize etc.
     
  4. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    Jan 31, 2008

    It is quite normal for 3 year olds to behave in the way you described. Their listening skill are still developing. Structure and clarity are good. You also may want to reduce the time that they have to sit still. Also take a look at what you are asking them to sit still for. Is it enjoyable? Do they want to be there for that time? If not, rethink the lesson.

    I have to disagree with Budaka. Behavioral interventions, such as the use of tangible reinforcers are not necessary. In my opinion they should only be used as a last resort. There was no such system in my daughters daycare (as a 3 yr old) or in preschool (as a 4 year old). The kids did just fine.
     
  5. revlove

    revlove Rookie

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    Feb 5, 2008

    I am now teaching the 2-5 year olds. I have found that I try to do everything in 7 or 10 minute intervals. Change is good!
    ( I used to teach the elementary age, so I know that there are adjustments to be made for the younger children)

    We may read, color, sing, do puzzles... but I watch to see when their attention begins to drift. (then I simply find the next activity or lesson) I have to have a lot of lesson plans options, depending on how many children I have. I hope this helps. Simply said, give the children an opportunity to grow and learn.
    I have structure, but I am flexible.
     
  6. bcblue

    bcblue Comrade

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    Feb 6, 2008

    A few things--

    Raise your personal tolerance for things like "all talking at once"--they just DO it way more (I moved from elementary to preK this year, too, and it's been an adjustment!)

    Some kids have a HARD time sitting on the floor, and need their space defined for them. Do you have carpet squares for them to sit on (stay on your square), and you may have one or two who really need a chair to sit in to help them focus.

    If you have a longer sitting activity, interrupt it in the middle with some kind of movement. Make it surprising to them. Everybody stand up touch your toes spin around sit down! Or a moving song. Or something. Don't forget to have them do movements that cross the midline--brain research says it's good for your brain. Stimulates both hemispheres and inter-hemisphere communication.

    You could use a "talking stick" --during a time you really want them to take turns talking, pull out the special talking stick, and only the person holding the stick may speak. This can be a really helpful visual and tactile aid for some groups (other groups just don't care). If you try it, remember, it will take a little time to establish to them that that's what it's for. And the talking stick should be special in that it's not an item they use for anything else during the day (so not a toy from play areas).
     
  7. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Feb 6, 2008

    For this age group, sitting still for more than 3-5 minutes just isn't realitic. Make it short. Make it simple. Stop while they are still succeeding, and praise like crazy! If all they can manage is 2 minutes, then do 2 minutes and catch them being good.

    Carpet squares work much better than a carpet at this age, because they don't have a defined sense of space yet. If all you have is a rug, use some masking tape and put some lines on it. Those are the lines they should be sitting on. Use a smaller piece to make a cross mark. X marks the spot where you should be sitting. No scootching! The tape helps them to understand where they should be and where they should stay.
     
  8. revlove

    revlove Rookie

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    Feb 6, 2008

    I agree with all. Very good advice. Thanks
     

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