Behaviors and consequences

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.Jasztal, Jul 2, 2008.

  1. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Though I have been on the fourth grade train four times before, I would like to develop some new management resources for this coming year.

    What are your specific consequences (and things students have to do) when students-

    -Lie
    -Cheat
    -Steal
    -Engage in Physical Contact
    -ARGUE (with you or one another- my largest pet peeve)
    -Etc.

    I just want to hear different opinions... and also hear what has worked for you.

    Also, what do you do to ensure...
    -Students bring in healthy snacks
    -Students bring in water (and not sneak in soda- I had this issue for the first time ever last year)
     
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  3. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I don't know about the other things, as I deal with them in a case by case basis, but as for the water, my kids bring in an empty bottle and fill it in the sink each morning.

    I do my best to monitor snacks, but unless I am providing them the parents get to choose their child's food. I have made kids give me the candy, as it is not allowed at school. Otherwise, they do have things like pudding, which I would prefer they not have- however, I have to pick my battles.
     
  4. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Good. What would you do if the students argued with you when you took their candy? (I had a bunch of future lawyers :) in last year's class (not so much in my previous three classes, lol, so I was in for a shock), and I really feel I need to lay things down on the table this year.)

    I don't feel sending students to reflect every time they do something like that is a great idea... there must be a better way to let students know you mean business.
     
  5. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I'm reading this thread with much interest!
     
  6. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I think to solve the food problem, one kid will have to supply snacks for every few days for my class (Laura Candler has some healthy snack tips on her website). I let kids bring *their own* snacks last year, but eventually it got to be too much. I let kids eat breakfast in the room last year, also, but now I am going to declare that I don't want them coming back with the breakfast. They have to dine in the cafeteria. :)
     
  7. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    My kids are pretty good about not arguing. I had one boy this year who would try to argue his way out of things, but I have to hold my ground, and if they continue I send them to the office. It only happened a few times until the rest of the kids figured me out. Also, they didn't bring candy much. Only a few times. I like the idea of everyone pitching in for snacks. Be ware that some parents could forget. Maybe add a "non-perishable" snack to serve x number of kids on the supply list, and then ask for another set before winter break. I would do that, providing you have the space. Even the cheap bags of cereal would work as long as it's relatively healthy.
     
  8. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Thanks, MissFroggy. I am all for having a positive year. I know I have changed quite a bit since this past year because I came in very excited... and sometimes I didn't stand my ground as I should have. Of course my students learned, and by the end of the year, we had more accomplishments than any of the other classes I had instructed. However, some things took me aback and I really want to establish very strong routines with my students this year. I really need to be stern when kids try arguing with me (I think I spent too much time with my mouth scraping the ground, and I am upset by that now, but there isn't anything I can do besides focus on this next class).
     
  9. sundrop

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    I had a student who wanted to argue about everything last year. I learned quickly that if you are sucked into an argument with a student there is very little chance you will get out in one piece! If a student starts to argue, I tell them I will not discuss it further. They know the classroom rules. That is their warning. (I give a warning, a time out, and then it is a visit to the principal's office.) Another line I use often is, if you would like to discuss this further you will have to come in and see me after school. This rarely happens because they don't even remember by the end of school that they were going to talk to me and they really wanted to waste class time anyway not use their own time.
     
  10. JustT

    JustT Comrade

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    the consequence in my room is a look of extreme disappointment. I tell the student I had thought highly of them and I think I must have been wrong. A retired teacher showed me how powerful my approval is to a student. It can generate remorse.

    Often times, I don't think the apple falls far from the tree, so "stealing" seems like a good way to gain things they can't afford. I'll offer small opportunities in my classroom so they will have the chance to get a pencil the proper way instead of stealing.... asking politely, do a small class chore, run an errand, etc...

    Cheatig-- often tells me the student isn't ready for the skill. They are either struggling to comprehend or have poor self-confidence in their learning.

    Physical contact - I recite the student handbook and tell them I we need to create a risk free environment. They may be moved to a different seating if two students can't seem to get along.

    ARGUE -- There's a right way to disagree and a disrespectful one. They cannot take class time to discuss a petty issue and I have a complaint form they can fill out. If they don't take the time to write it out, it's probaly not important enough for my attention. I have stopped the class once and asked, "How many students here feel like their education is being interrupted?" I give the student a complaint form and they can immediately write out their complaint. (this is usually the... "that's not fair" because i didn't get my way... argument)

    I had a student once who would argue what is written in the textbook. I factually remind the student they have a good point however, the author has a PhD which means about 8 years of college and has been studying the topic for a number of years. He may have years of scientific proof. You need scientific proof to disagree... now back on topic.
     
  11. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    cheating: re-do another assignment and average the second grade with a 50% on the first assignment

    physical contact: in my building, this is an automatic trip to the principal

    arguing: I'm happy to discuss this further with you at lunch recess. See you at 12:10 sharp. (I am also a lawyer, so this is no problem to me!)

    lie: student writes out their version of the "truth" and usually trips themself up

    steal: if I have proof, I call the parents
     
  12. fuzzybunnie

    fuzzybunnie Rookie

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    I have younger kids (first grade) so I can't do the write it out bit when they lie. I usually talk with them instead but it's time consuming, especially since the incidents happen right after lunch or recess. Any ideas?

    For arguing I usually just say sternly "are you arguing with me?" and that stops it. For stealing one warning (they're young) and then a call home. For cheating (on tests) they redo the test. Once I had a parent that had blatently done the child's homework. That merited a conference.
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2008
  13. JustT

    JustT Comrade

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    OOOOOhhhh:woot: I have this problem at least once a year. I feel so badly for the child... actually both of them.

    How did you adress that fuzziebunnie?
     
  14. stevesgirl

    stevesgirl Companion

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    I read something in a book a while back (it might have been Teaching with Love and Logic) that I use to curb arguing with a lot of success. I tell the students at the beginning of the year that "I schedule arguments for 1:00 (recess) and 3:00 (after school). There is a sign-up sheet on the front table. If you want to continue this later please select a time on the sheet." No one ever put their name on the sheet...
     
  15. Calalilys

    Calalilys Comrade

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    Students will be written up for cheating, stealing, and engaging in physical contact. Depending on the seriousness of the lie, I will deal with that myself, as well as the arguing. If a student lies I explain to them that they have now lost my trust and will have to work on gaining it back and then they get their name on the board/check. Arguing is one of those things that I will not tolerate and my students know that from day one so I never have to deal with that. If it became excessive or happened more than once, I would write them up. Fortunately, I rarely have to deal with these types of behaviors because I make it clear to my students on day one that that behavior will not be tolerated. I am going to also adopt a policy this year that if it does, the student will be calling their parents at lunch to explain what happened in class. That way I'm standing right beside them and no he said/she said can happen. I'm doing this with missing homework and incomplete assignments, too.

    In your welcome back letter I would explain what types of snacks and drinks are allowed in the classroom. You may also want to list different types of snacks, such as apples, oranges, crackers, cheese stick, etc. Then clearly state that water is the only acceptable liquid allowed in class. if a student is caught with something else, it will be poured down the drain.
     
  16. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Excellent suggestions so far, particularly Calalilys. :) More is appreciated... always. :)
     
  17. cheeryteacher

    cheeryteacher Enthusiast

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    Lie- Conference with kid, and give punishment on a case by case basis.
    Cheat- 0% and call home.
    Steal- Write up.
    Physical Contact- Depends on severity. If it's back and forth taps, I'll handle it. If they are fighting its a write up.
    Argue- It takes one to argue and two to make a conversation out of it. Stay calm and silent. Anything that you say will be interpreted by the student as arguing back.
    Snacks- Write a list of snacks they can bring. If they bring something that is prohibited, they take it back home and don't get snack for the day.
     
  18. fuzzybunnie

    fuzzybunnie Rookie

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    The problem was more complicated than that and ialso nvolved the student forging her parent's signature. (pretty transparent for a first grader!) I had a conference with the parent and very firmly addressed the issue of plagiarism and also of over-indulgence. I had two students in my class last year that I am really worried about, that girl and a boy who was a constant lier and was manipulating his mother to think that whenever he got into trouble it was someone else's fault.
     
  19. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    Great suggestions. I put exceptable snacks in my newsletter too. Having the students call their parents to explain problems is every effective. With you standing there they must tell the truth. They hate when I say let's go call your mom/dad.
     
  20. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    -Lie
    I don't make too big a deal out of it. I just tell them that I'm disappointed and I'm sure they are, too. Then I tell them that they are better than that.
    -Cheat
    Throw it in the trash and do it over again at recess. If it happened again, I would contact the parent if they were the type to care. If not, then I just mark it unsatisfactory and give it a zero.
    -Steal
    Depends on the situation. If someone is just being a jerk and took someone else's pencil and won't give it back, I tell him or her to hand it back. If it's something more serious, like money or items, I'll search for it, find it, give it back, notify parents if they are the type who care. If not, I'll take away recess for quite awhile, even though we're not supposed to.
    -Engage in Physical Contact
    Sent to the office. No excuse, no exceptions.
    -ARGUE
    "I don't argue with kids." is what I'll say if my stare doesn't seem to work. Argue with each other? I'll usually just move someone unless I'm in an inventive mood.(with you or one another- my largest pet peeve)
    -Etc.

    I just want to hear different opinions... and also hear what has worked for you.

    Also, what do you do to ensure...
    -Students bring in healthy snacksI take up junk food and give it to them at the end of the day to put in their bookbag. I don't even bother contacting the parent. If the kid wants to have a snack, he or she had better bring something that is not sugary.
    -Students bring in water (and not sneak in soda- I had this issue for the first time ever last year)Same answer as before.

    I have a feeling you had a rough time last year. We all have those years. The fact that you are thinking about how to make sure it doesn't happen again is a significant leap in the right direction. It probably won't happen again. You seem to be too good of a teacher, too dedicated, to let a bunch of kids run your classroom. Just think of it as a blip and be glad they're gone.

    Work on the glacial stare this summer. See if you can freeze someone at the store. Refuse to engage in an argument with your husband or child, and tell them later that you were practicing.
     
  21. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    I think lying is a really tricky one. There are times when you know it's just their development (I went to Disneyland last weekend TOO!) and other times it's blatant (I didn't do it!) I really try to ignore the kind of lies that could be embarrassing to kids and call them on the ones that are hurtful or damaging to them or others.

    For example, one of my fourth grade boys brought in this box of baby photos for sharing. He showed this picture and said, "this was when I modeled for a catalogue." It was totally a regular sears photo- and when I read the back, it wasn't even HIM! I don't think he knew it wasn't him, as it was his box of photos he probably didn't check. I would not have said anything in that case. It would have totally embarrassed him.

    If someone lies right to my face and I know they are lying I call them on and we usually talk about. But kids probably lie about a lot of things we are not even aware of.
     
  22. stillkicken

    stillkicken New Member

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    Invisible Curriculum: Social, Emotional, Development

    :help: Here is a tough question. How much of our time and effort as teachers is primarily directed toward responding to challenging behavior and promoting emotional and mental health for our students? We all know that this is an essential part of teaching> Neither good teaching or meaningful learning can take place without it.
    .... But most of it is so blended with everything else we do as teachers that it is hard to say where teaching the curriculum ends and
    behavioral support or mental health promotion begins. I would love to hear from other teachers. Please let me know the percentage of your time and effort that you feel you devote to this invisible "mental health promotion and social development" curriculum and how important you think it is to teaching in general.:thanks:
     
  23. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Cheating Automatic zero on test,no credit on homework assignment.If I feel another child has aided them,they both receive punishment. Repeat offenders have parents called to discuss the matter with me and the offending student.

    Lie- WE discuss at the beginning of the year that I will trust them until they give me reason not to.If they lie it means they have broken my trust and it will be hard to believe them the next time even if they re telling the truth.We act out a few possibilities to show how this can harm them.If caught lying more than once their parent is notified

    Steal-This to me is something I cannot tolerate.I tell them if they need school supplies and cannot obtain it let me know and I will get it for them.Once again we show in role play how stealing can affect a whole class,and if caught you lose everyones trust and every time something is missing,you become a suspect. Parent is notified if this occurs and most come up to meet with me and the child.(Sometimes I learn Where the child got his values from.)

    Arguing-Not during class time.I ask them to write down their thoughts,and we can discuss them calmly over lunch,during prep time or any time we can discuss it without the class losing teaching time.I allow the child to express their point of view and then I give mine. Sometimes I learn something about the student or myself.

    Physical Contact-Nobody in the class is permitted to make physical contact with another child to harm them in any way.The school rule is fighting is a suspension for all participants. Of course since my principal is worried about two things our test scores and her reputation this doesn't always happen.For this reason the circumstances in many cases determine whether I will talk to the students,send them for peer mediation,call their parent or send them to my supervisor,which can be very frustrating when they come back ten minutes latter after being told don't do that again.
     
  24. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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  25. teach_each1

    teach_each1 Comrade

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    ugh-I had a problem with stealing this year (well, not me :) but a few kids in my class)

    They were repeat offenders (btw-our policy is they go to the safe room for that) and their defense was it wasen't stealing b/c they didn't take it from a store. One girl over and over told me it was only stealing if you took it from a store.
     
  26. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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  27. shouldbeasleep

    shouldbeasleep Enthusiast

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    Jul 5, 2008

    I LOVE THE SUPERSPEED 1000! Never used it before, just got done downloading it, and am going to make booklets for the kids next year. Got 3 MI students (mentally challenged) next year that will come back in my class for 40 minutes before lunch. I'll get the Superspeed 100 for them until they can get to the 1000.

    THANK YOU! :wow::2up::thanks:
     
  28. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    bumping so more people will comment
     
  29. fuzzybunnie

    fuzzybunnie Rookie

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    Stillkicken, I think you/ve hit on an important point. I tell my parents at back to school night that 50% of what the students learn in first grade is behavior. What they've learned in Kindergarten are the foundations basic social skills. In first grade we not only reinforce those skills but teach them how to sit at a desk, work independently, share, work cooperatively, accept authority, I could go on and on. I think there should be a section in the state standards on behavior, because it's just as important as reading and math because it has long-term consequences for success in school. So I don't consider time spent on behavior issues "wasted." I just imagine what will happen to the kid that's mean, that lies, that doesn't accept my authority, etc. when he or she is a teenager.

    But it's important that good behavior is rewarded as well. At the end of each day I give a sticker to each child who stayed in "geen"--we do a red, green, yellow, card system--and a "special book coupon" to those who go beyond and go into what we call :purple". Stickers and book coupons are highly prized--the whole class applauds when the purples are called outl. So behavior education does not necessarily focus on the problems, but needs to model the positive behaviors as well.

    Sorry for being so wordy!
     
  30. fuzzybunnie

    fuzzybunnie Rookie

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    Oops, of course I meant "purple." I seriously need my coffee.
     
  31. Yank7

    Yank7 Habitué

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    Stillkicken-CONGRATULATIONS. You have hit the nail right on the head.Which is more important A.) learning respect,to use proper manners,anger management,conflict resolution skills .or B)the ability to bubble the correct answer or write a sentence to show we understand a silly paragraph on a test.If in your school the answer is truthfully A you are in a very unusual school.I am afraid most of us would have to answer B.When the newspapers start posting and ranking schools according to the number of incidents in the school then behavior will become important to the school system.Of course this will not work because many administrators don't report all incidents anyway.I just read an article where special ed students, in a middle school ,spent a majority of the school year doing test prep to raise their test scores.Even ten minutes a period is wasted due to improper behavior is unfair to the teacher and children in the classroom.Not enough is being done to guarantee our teachers and children a learning experience for the entire time they are in school.
     
  32. hawkteacher

    hawkteacher Comrade

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    I had the ultimate behavior class last year and arguing was their number one favorite thing to do. They loved to argue with each other and they loved to argue with me. As a first year teacher with a class so notorious other teachers transfered to avoid them, it took me a little while to figure everything out. Once I did . . .

    bottom line --- there is no arguing with the teacher.

    If students started to argue with me, I gave them a warning and a a very stern line about being the teacher, an adult they will respect, etc

    If they couldn't lower their voice, or change their attitude in the conversation to make it a discussion instead of an argument, I told them I was done speaking to them until they could speak to me with respect. If they later apologized and asked for another chance, I might speak with them, I might not. It depended on the situation.

    Repeat offenders (I had one incredibly disrespectful student) would have to call home in the middle of the day to explain to their parents why they were being disrespectful to the teacher. One embarrassing phone call home with tears and usually yelling on the other end from the parents in front of their classmates, usually put a stop to much of the arguing.

    By the end of the year, other staff members continually commented how polite and well behaved my class was.

    I think the key is to be consistent with whatever plan you decided to take and never ever let them treat you disrespectfully. If you're consistent, they'll figure it out and stop. If they see that they can "win" and get away with bad behavior from time to time, they will continue to try.

    As far as the other things . . .

    cheating --- 0 on the paper, phone call home. No chance to do the assignment/test over again. They made the choice, to cheat, they'll have to deal with the consequences.

    lying --- I agree with other posters that it depends on the situation. I talk a lot about trust.

    stealing --- Also depends on the situation. Stealing a pencil? Talk about it, disappointed, show them a better way to get a pencil if they need one. Anything more serious --- detention or suspension. I had a student suspended for several days after he stole reward tokens and then tried to blame another student.

    Physical violence --- Not acceptable. Depending on the offense, detention or suspension. In my class we never put our hands on others.

    Can you tell that I had a real gem of a class lol? ;)
     

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