Behavior

Discussion in 'Fifth Grade' started by mstnteacherlady, Jul 13, 2008.

  1. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

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    Jul 13, 2008

    Does anyone out there use a system for behavior management in the 5th grade classroom that does not rely on moving a card or the classroom economy? If so, what is your plan like? What do you do?
     
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  3. katenar

    katenar Cohort

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    Jul 14, 2008

  4. BeckyRamone

    BeckyRamone Rookie

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    Wow Kate, your website is amazing!

    As for behaviour, I also do classroom dollars primarily as well as a whole class reward for ontask work, where if they meet a benchmark we might go out for a game, or do a quick drama activity etc. For my kids with behaviour issues, I have individual plans that I work out with them.
     
  5. missred4190

    missred4190 Comrade

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    For me, I'm doing a classroom economy this year. In fact, I got all of my ideas from Ms. Jensen (you so totally rock!!!!) I'm also throwing myself 100% into Power Teaching, and I think that will make a huge impact on my students and the classroom atmosphere.
     
  6. katenar

    katenar Cohort

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    Thank you! I had a lot of fun doing it with my own class last year. I think I may introduce credit cards this year. Still trying to work out the logistics but keep checking the site as I'll be adding more stuff as my economy systems expands. :)
     
  7. katenar

    katenar Cohort

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    Thank you! I'm so glad you like it. :2up:
     
  8. Calalilys

    Calalilys Comrade

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    I don't move cards or use an economy system. My students get their name on the board if they break a rule and then checks if the behavior continues. Check one equals silent lunch, which means they sit in a certain area of the cafeteria and cannot talk to anyone. Two checks equals lunch detention, which means they sit in the classroom during recess and don't talk. Three checks equals after school detention and four checks equals a conference between the parents, child, and teacher. Last year I introduced a behavior sheet that I staple into each child's agenda every Monday and at the end of the day, students get a smiley face stamp on it if they're name wasn't on the board and students that did get their name/checks, I mark on their behavior sheet as to why they did.
    At the end of the year, my students actually told me that the behavior sheet made them behavior better because they knew their parents would see exactly why they got into trouble each day. It was interesting to hear that from them because it would've never crossed my mind.
     
  9. Teacher Chele

    Teacher Chele Habitué

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    Jul 14, 2008

    I keep a clip board with a chart for the day on it. If a child misbehaves he/she receives a mark. I let the kids make monthly objects (i.e. Jan.=snowflakes) each month and put magnetic tape on them. I have cards on my white board and the kids move their object each time they get a mark. That way they have a visual and you have documentation. Even the older kids love making the monthly objects and changing them up keeps it new and fresh so they want to keep their object at the top of the board and don't like having to move it.
     
  10. 100%Canadian

    100%Canadian Companion

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    Jul 15, 2008

    I've said this before on the A to Z forums but I'm not a big fan of token economies because it builds in an expectation that there's always a reward for something - and in real life, it isn't always that way. Honestly, what do you get for finishing your report cards? :)

    I handle my classroom behaviour on the fly and deal with things as they arise. Consequences might be a missed recess or after school detention or a phone call home - it depends on the issue. However, I also promote positivity and respect in my room on a daily basis (eg. Thank you, Kaitlyn, for getting that highlighter for Josh, or, I'm very pleased with the way Daniel is working today). I will reward appropriate whole-class and individual behaviour but I do it randomly so there's never an expectation of a reward. If they ask, "What do I get?", then I reply with, "The honour of winning" or "My undying gratitude." That's what works for me.

    Now I will confess that I run a table-group seating scenario in my room where teams gather points throughout the month. There's often a small prize for the winning team (token economy, I know) but I use it more for transition times than behaviour management (eg. Which team is ready for recess first?).
     
  11. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

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    This sounds similar to what I've done in the past. I'm with you on the token economy. I just don't think it's me. That's why I started the post. I'm looking for something new. Something I can work with and it works for me!

     
  12. 5thgradeTNteach

    5thgradeTNteach Rookie

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    I'm not really hot on the economy system- its not really my style!
    I teach 5th grade in the departmentalization setting (social studies) and my team uses the demerit system. Each student has a agenda that is given to them at the beginning of the year. Each 5th grade teacher has 2 specific color self-inking stamps- like mine is orange. We bought them at Office Max for about 15.00 each. One of the stamps has my name at the top and homework at the bottom, the other one has my name at the top and behavior at the bottom. When a student breaks one of the classroom rules or doesn't have their homework- we simply stamp their agenda on the appropriate day and then quickly jot under the stamp what the offense was or what the missing assignment was. Students must then serve a study hall (during recess) during which they complete missing work or read quietly. The consequences are as follows:
    Consequences
    BEHAVIOR (in one week's time)
    1 stamp = Study Hall
    2 stamps = Study Hall
    3 stamps = Parent contact
    4 stamps = Office
    ***Severe disruptions will result in office immediately
    HOMEWORK (in one week's time)
    1 stamp = Study Hall
    2 stamps = Study Hall
    3 stamps = ISS (1/2 day or until work completed) and parent contact
    4 stamps = ISS (Full Day)
    5 stamps = Office
    This system works very well for us- Hope this helps!
     
  13. runnerss

    runnerss Comrade

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    Jul 16, 2008

    Our school gives punch cards to each students. After the first punch is a warning.. The second is a phone call home. The third punch means they go to the office. They get a new card every week. This a no nonsense school.
     
  14. runnerss

    runnerss Comrade

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  15. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

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    Jul 17, 2008

    Limit Setting to stop unwanted behaviors. Responsibility Training with PAT (Preferred Activity Time) to start wanted behaviors. These do not have cards, tokens, Lucky Bucks, marble jars, star charts, names-on-board etc. or any thing which increases teacher's work load (managing the tokens) or singles out individual students for being "bad".

    PAT is group reward based on peer pressure to get kids to hustle during transitions, keep them in seats, turn in work on time, hustle during class chores or any routine which will save teacher more time to teach. Class is rewarded with "time" -- time to do a preferred activity. The PAT must be learning related - no kicking back and talking with friends - and something the teacher can live with (my class' favorite was JEOPARDY which had review of week's lessons).
     
  16. ArizonaTchr72

    ArizonaTchr72 Companion

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    Jul 17, 2008

    I would have to say in defense of the economy system that if you use it in the manner in which Ms. Jensen advocates, you are teaching the students about economics and life skills, two areas which are included in my state standards. There are so many adaptations for the economy system which go beyond behavior. The students can learn about applying for jobs, banking, and being rewarded for good work. I start out my year by asking my students if their parents have ever been given a bonus for good work or if they have ever received a traffic ticket for breaking a traffic law. The economy system has a basis in real life that my students can really relate to.
     
  17. katenar

    katenar Cohort

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    Exactly. This is why I have never looked at doing the economy system as "extra work for the teacher". I really ended up eliminating bad behavior and teaching state standards (and let's be honest - life skills!!) all at the same time. Plus, I have done it all (cards, PAT time, points, and refocusing) and I have found that my kids have NEVER been so excited about coming to class as they were when I started the economy midway through school last year. Even the parents absolutely loved it. Many told me how it really opened up the doors of communication between them and their child about real life issues such as money, rent and banking. I'm even looping this year (which we didn't know on the last day but the kids have been notified about it now) and have recieved e-mails from just about all of the kids asking if we would still do the classroom economy! :lol:

    But, this is the best thing about teaching. Each of us is free to do what works best for our individual classroom! :hugs: And mine just happens to be the classroom economy. :2up:
     
  18. mstnteacherlady

    mstnteacherlady Cohort

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    You're both right! It is a great system, and it definitely teaching the kids many different things. However, it's not for me. That's why I asked about things that don't have anything to do with the economy system.
    Katenar, you have so many good ideas! I keep seeing all these good ideas pop up all over the site and they seem to be linked to your name a good deal of time. You have great ideas! :)
     
  19. katenar

    katenar Cohort

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    Thank you mstnteacherlady! :blush:
     
  20. ArizonaTchr72

    ArizonaTchr72 Companion

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    Jul 17, 2008

    You might also want to check out Ms. Powell's website for some other great ideas. She has a bead system that would work great for fifth grade and a token economy system using numbered chips in a bag.

    http://www.mspowell.com/ Scroll down to behavior management.
     

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