Behavior system

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by pabef, Jun 5, 2015.

  1. pabef

    pabef Comrade

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    Jun 5, 2015

    What do you use for a behavior system? I teach 4 year-olds and this year I used a sticker chart. If a student had good behavior they got a sticker on their chart for that day. On Friday if they had all of their stickers for the week, they got in the treasure box. I really try to make sure each child gets a sticker and redirect behavior, but some days pulling a sticker was a must. My problem is that some days I would forget to let them put their stickers on their chart and by Friday I could not remember who had lost their sticker. What do you use?
     
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  3. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

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    Jun 5, 2015

    I teach 3-5 year olds with special needs. Typically I don't use a classwide behavior system. I spend a lot of time at the beginning of the year reviewing rules and expectations, and do a weekly social/emotional lesson throughout the year. At the end of each day, I usually give a sticker/stamp on hands for students who have made "right" choices. I do it everyday at the beginning of the year, and then sporadically towards the end so that they get more excited when it happens. For students who pop up throughout the year that have more difficult behavior, I do individual behavior charts. Typically they are sticker charts or some type of token economy system. For example, this year out of 16 students, I had 3 on various token systems to reinforce good behaviors, and in some cases tokens were taken away for negative behaviors.

    In the past, I had a particularly rough class one year that had almost every student needing a behavior system per their IEPs. I ended up doing a classwide system that year. On the wall, every child had a "gumball machine" drawn on, with 10 gumball circles inside. Each teacher in the classroom carried a marker around. For good choices, teachers would say something like "oh I like how you are sitting, you get a gumball" and color in a circle. When all the circles in their gumball machine were colored in, the students got to pick a "prize" from a mystery box. The prizes were things like "wear a hat to school" or "eat lunch next to the teacher". I typically don't do actual prizes. Gumballs weren't taken away for unwanted behavior, so it was only a positive reinforcement system. It worked pretty well. I also developed a social story to go along with it that we placed in the classroom library saying things like "I get a gumball when I keep my hands to myself, I get a gumball when I sit quietly on the carpet, etc.." Whenever the gumball machines were filled up, I sent it home to be seen by the parents and a new one went on the wall.

    I know a couple teachers in my district that use clip charts, stoplights, etc.. but my principal is pretty anti-any visual systems that make it obvious how a child's day is going, so I try to steer away from things like that.
     
  4. ash_sk8s

    ash_sk8s Companion

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    Jun 17, 2015

    We are very big into PBIS at my school. Our 3 rules are "be safe, be friendly, and be a worker." We use something called be-bands to reward the children when we see desired behaviors. My director crochets a single strand bracelet and we keep a large stock of them in our classrooms. When we see desired behaviors, we are able to instantly recognize/reward as we keep be-bands on us at all times. We will see, "Wow, that was really friendly when you helped Jack clean-up. Would you like a be-band?" The children put them on the wrists and wear them proudly! We have a jar in the classroom that they drop their be-bands in. When it is full, we have a be-band party! The children are in charge of deciding what to do for their party. During circle, I let each child offer a suggestion. Then I pick 3 ideas that are feasible and have the children vote on them. We've done things such as dress-up parties, popsicle parties, bubble parties, treasure hunts, etc.
     
  5. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Jun 17, 2015

    Is it just me, or am I old?

    In my experience, most kids don't need a system and those who do either don't understand it, don't have the impulse control to stop themselves or don't care.

    I think just having a good environment and rules in place, practicing procedures and routines and noticing when they are making good choices seems to be all that is needed most of the time.

    I also have a problem with rewards for normal, expected behaviors. Kids should be doing a good job because it is the right thing to do, not because they get a sticker or ? I have had kids tell me they won't clean up or whatever unless they get a reward. Really? :dizzy:

    :sorry:I am tired. Maybe I am ranting.
     
  6. ash_sk8s

    ash_sk8s Companion

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    Jun 18, 2015

    When it is a skill that is newer, I give out be-bands more frequently. As the year progresses, I give less out for everyday things and replace it with a simple thank you. You should always be acknowledging the behaviors you WANT to see out of children, versus what you don't. If a child ever explicitly asks for a be-band, the answer is no!
     
  7. eternalsaudade

    eternalsaudade Companion

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    Jun 19, 2015

    I would recommend against taking away stickers at the very least. For undesirable behaviors, I find natural consequences are the most effective. For my twos, this may be if you hit a friend with a toy, you may no longer play with the toy. If you are standing/jumping on the couch, you will need to find a different area to play. In general, I find this much more effective than obscure consequences like taking away stickers or time outs, even with older kids.

    As far as the sticker rewards, I would make sure they are given immediately and I would not only give one per day. Instead, I would be on the lookout each day for behaviors you want to see, approach the child and say "I really like how you X, would you like to choose a sticker?" However, don't do this every single time. I find random reinforcement works much better and keeps kids from expecting a sticker for every single thing they do, no matter how mundane or expected. Additionally, make sure you are offering a lot of praise, not just stickers. Ultimately, you want your reward system to help instill a sense of pride and personal fulfilment, not obedience for the sake of tangible awards.
     
  8. Mrs.Sheila

    Mrs.Sheila Cohort

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    Jul 24, 2015

    NO WAY! I have one rule to start the year in my class. "NO SWIMMING". The rest we can "talk through"!

    Most behavior systems are emotionally based on the teacher more so than the child. We all have those days where we could throw all the little Tommys and Tammys in timeout because they are on our nerves, and we all have those days where all we see are rainbows and smell is sprinkles!
     
  9. ChildWhisperer

    ChildWhisperer Groupie

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    Jul 24, 2015

    I didn't use a behavior chart the past 2 years and they were by far the best 2 years of kids I've had. They were well-behaved, played together nicely, and whenever one of them did start acting up, I'd pull them aside & talk to them or send them to another area of the room depending on the "crime". They respected me & each other so much, other teachers always commented on how I had the best class.
    So.. long story short, I don't do behavior charts or reward systems :)
     

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