Behavior Problem

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by amethysst, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. amethysst

    amethysst Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2008

    First day of school yesterday -- I have eighteen four year olds. One little boy is definitely going to be my challenge. He can't seem to sit still during circle time without touching friends next to him. During open centers he is wandering around the room, touching toys other children are playing with, grabbing things from other children. I could use a person just to follow him around and redirect and it would be a fulltime job. Any suggestions ladies, I want to nip it right in the bud. I took on way too much yesterday with activities which didn't help the situation. I don't want to sound like I am whining but I have an assistant who gets overwhelmed but the simplest situations (another story completely but she is there to stay) so I know this situation is going to be all mine....! I need so great ideas from some great ladies...
     
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  3. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Aug 19, 2008

    He sounds like my son, who was also in my early ed program. He remained like this in public school. Still like this.

    Try having him run errands for you, in addition to the centers.

    try having some sort of center tag or token he can look at to know where he is supposed to be. so if you have a red necklace you are to be add apple bob or what ever. other children can do this as well.

    it is possible that he doesn't have any experience with sharing. my son didn't have that issue as much, but then you could set up diads rather that groups and have is pair superivised to that you can demonstrate how to share.

    Make sure there is a lot of gross motor. IMO that helped here.
     
  4. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Aug 19, 2008

    I have several thoughts:

    1. This is all new to him, and you will have to keep reminding him. The first week of school I go through the room and show them how to use the areas, and what type of expectations I have for them--like put away when done.
    2. Circle time is too long for him. Does he have to sit the whole time? Can he get up and do something else?
    3. He may not know what to do--he may not know how to play with blocks, color, etc.
    4. Have your aide spend a chunck of the day helping him learn to focus.
     
  5. amethysst

    amethysst Rookie

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    Aug 19, 2008

    All good ideas. . . but the one thing I failed to mention and that is the three year old teacher went through this with him last year. This is his second year here in the school. We had Devereaux come in to the school also and do a screening on him. She offered his last year's teacher the book I Love You Rituals. His mom has told her that his doctor has said he will probably be on meds for ADHD by the time he is five. I am just wanting to reach him in someway without having to resort to time outs and being sent to the office. So my point is he knows what we want him to do, he knows how we want him to play, he knows what is expected from him he just can't seem to do it! He could not wait to come to my class. . . I heard it everyday during the summer. His mom said it was all he talked about last weekend. We are out because of the tropical storm . . I almost can't wait to get back to school to try again. We did do Class Rules yesterday. I have printed out the visual reminders and it will be come a poster in the classroom. I think I am going to have to look through that book again and see what pointers I can find. Keep the ideas coming!
     
  6. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Aug 19, 2008

    Give him something to hold in his hands!

    Something like this http://www.tangletoys.com/catalog/ or a stressball.

    If it is his first time in pre-k you have to teach rules, over and over for some kids cause they don't get it. Sit him besides others that get it the first time. Sit him front and center by you, and make circle time VERY SHORT initially.
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Aug 19, 2008

    Have you tried using visuals with him? Regardless of whether he'll be diagnosed with something or not, a lot of kids that have a hard time understanding verbal instructions, sharing, focusing, etc. do very well when they are presented with visual supports. There are many free cards you can print from do2learn.com There are also many other sites such as http://www.setbc.org/pictureset/category.aspx?id=6 where you can print rule cards, activity schedules, behavior charts, etc. I would start out simple with some basic visuals to show him what's expected. Perhaps he could have a card (as someone mentioned) that goes around his neck to show him where he's supposed to be at a certain time. If you find him wandering, you can say "Johnny, check your card - where are you supposed to be?" This might help with independence, he might feel a sense of control (he gets to look at the card, see where to go, etc.) Maybe a card that has the quiet sign on it... for circle time. I would also invite different students (but especially him) up to be your helper (point to the calendar, etc.) so he can get up out of his seat. You might even help him by giving him a carpet square or some tape on the carpet to show him his boundaries ("you stay in this box during circle time").

    Visual cues can be very successful if they are implemented correctly.
     
  8. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Aug 19, 2008

    My middle son was a lot like what you are describing. His pk-4 teacher had a lot of luck with giving him "jobs" to do during each activity. During circle time he was the page turner, during center times, he helped set things up, when he got antsy, he took the trash to the trash can, things like that. It took him about a month to really get the hang of it, but after that his teacher reported nothing but good things. I also noticed a major difference at home.
     
  9. tgi1515

    tgi1515 Comrade

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    Aug 19, 2008

    I've had a few kids that sound like this. There's no easy answer since every child is unique, however, the more I loved those children (usually boys) the more responsive they were.

    I "brainwashed" those students. I told them every positive thing I could think of. "I LOVE it when you make the right choices. I'm so proud when you..... I noticed what a good job you did when you.... I'm SO glad you're in my class...you're so (fill in the blank - smart, helpful, friendly....) I'm glad I can depend on you."

    It wasn't easy and sometimes in my head I thought I was a big fat liar.... but my face smiled and said the right things. On really hard days, I sent lots of things/notes to the other Pre-K teachers. Sometimes the kiddo just needed to take a walk and when they got back, we could go again. Sometimes when everything else seemed to fail... I used Skittles to "bribe" them. The "Skittle police" always looked the other way on those days.... they knew it was the last thing in my bag.

    Hang in there.:hugs:
     
  10. mrs27

    mrs27 Rookie

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    Aug 20, 2008

    Chicago...not to hijack, but how do you explain this to the others or do you just let them all hold something. I tried this approach last year with a little person and the others got very jealous and upset that he "got" something. I then had a whole new battle. How would you (or anyone else) handle this?? Any iput is appriciated:)
     
  11. amethysst

    amethysst Rookie

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    Aug 20, 2008

    Mrs 27 . . . I was thinking the same thing. I love the ideas that everyone has offered. But I was wondering the same thing. . . how can I give him something to hold without the others questioning when do they get their turn with it. I had two boys last year who were challenges and I was advised to let them leave the cirlce if they wanted. . . let them go in the child sized arm chair we have in the class and it worked to a degree but I often had children "who did get it and could do it" want to follow and leave the circle. That was behavior that was easier to rein back in but those who suggested give him something to hold can you suggest what to do when the others want it to? I am going to have to sit down with his mom and try to come up with ideas that work for both of us. I want to make the positive difference in his life. I hate the idea of a doctor already signing off and wanting to suggest meds for someone so young! I know it is going to be a hard and long year but I know helping to make a difference will be worth it in the long run.
     
  12. elliemay

    elliemay Rookie

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    Aug 20, 2008

    I understand what you are going through. Last year, I had a little boy who could not sit still, said hurtful things to the other children and more. I sat him in the front of the circle near me. I also kept a close watch when he was on the playground. He had a very big imagination and sometimes scared the other children.

    One of the reasons I think he had a problem was his fine motor skills. He could not hold a pencil or crayon. We worked on this throughout the year. His mom did decide to send him on to kindergarten and I believe he will be okay. As a result of the fine motor skill issue, the other children would comment on his abilities. He would get very frustrated and give up. My asst and I made sure he knew he could take his time and we would help him get back on track.

    By year's end, he was the one I was most proud of! His coloring was absolutely beautiful. His pencil control was much improved, although he still had difficulty in writing.

    I guess what I am trying to say is---just keep working with him and giving him positive feedback. Have alot of Patience!!! See what motivates him. I'm not too sure about giving him extra "jobs" that might seem like a reward to the other children. I'll have to think about that one...it's getting late and my brain is fogging up. :haha:
     
  13. teacherSMK

    teacherSMK Habitué

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    Aug 20, 2008

    I, too, would like to know how you handle the jealousy...if I give one kliddo a stress ball, everyone is going to want one, and then circle time will turn into chaos time. :help:
     
  14. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Aug 20, 2008

    With my son I had that trouble too when he was in my class. Now he was in my class AND had a toy. Too much for the others.

    We designated a jump and listen spot. It was in the back of the room but a straight line to circle. Anyone was allowed to jump, but only he could keep it up long enough. It wasn't a tramp, just a hoop of tape on the ground. Jump and Jump no standing. He could get a turn whenever he needed, but anyone could go if they jumped. That helped a little. Now that he is bigger he can just stand in his classroom's desgnated stand a listen spot. We worked a lot on biofeedback. what does your heart feel like, what does you head feel like. Take a breath....slow down. stuff like that. and Yoga for free time with everyone helped.
     
  15. PennStateCutie

    PennStateCutie Companion

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    Aug 21, 2008

    If you give him a little ball of silly putty or play doh, the other kids would never notice, especially if you sat him in the back of the pack...although, knowing kids as I do, he would probably show the stuff off since it is something different that no one else has and he obviously is in want of some special attention...

    and IMO, there's nothing wrong with a good time-out. It shows limits and boundaries, which he obviously needs. I'm not saying that time-outs are the answer to his problems (obviously there's a bigger issue), though
     

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