Behavior Plans

Discussion in 'First Grade' started by MrsHoot, Jun 23, 2010.

  1. MrsHoot

    MrsHoot Comrade

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    Jun 23, 2010

    One of the things that I plan on mastering this year is classroom management ;). I have some ideas and I have discovered the consistency is key and have gleaned several strategies from my team. The teacher's room that I'm in left me a stoplight. I believe that most of the first grade teachers use. She already has her old rules and consequences up. Yellow light- warning, Red Light- 5 minutes of recess, Second Red = whole recess. She said she's only ever had to use whole recess once or twice.

    I would like to reinforce the positive behaviors for kids as well. During my ST my Co-op had good behavior credit cards. At the end of the day she had a helper punch those students' cars who stayed on green all day. Once they get their whole card punched, they get a prize. I need something EASY. Otherwise, I tend to not follow through. Maybe I'll use stickers instead so that my first graders will be able to do it. I would rather not have to do it myself and have the kids do it honestly and independently.

    Also- I am planning on doing a whole class marble jar.

    What do you do and what are your consequences?? What have you found that works for you? :):thanks:
     
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  3. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Jun 23, 2010

    Instead of stickers, I gave tickets. However this year I am giving pennies. One of our 1st grade objectives in math is to recognize coins and their values. I'm hoping this will help! Once they get 5 pennies, they trade for a nickel. They save up their money to "buy" some rewards like: no shoes, seat bump, lunch with the teacher, etc.

    My consequences usually are identifying the problem and coming up with a way to solve it and what they will do in the future. They sometimes use part of their recess time to think of a solution.

    When they get a penny, they get a special sticker in their behavior log, otherwise it is left blank. I mark their log if they had to do some problem-solving. We use a code that lets the parents know what expectation they did not meet.
     
  4. MrsHoot

    MrsHoot Comrade

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    Jun 23, 2010

    So do you use like a Love and Logic approach? What are some of your codes?
     
  5. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

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    Jun 23, 2010

    Oh - We just number our report card expectations on the log. We have a key... for example: 1 - participates in activities 2 - respect for authority 3 - shows respect toward others 4 - controls talking... etc, etc.. Whichever expectation they don't meet, we write the corresponding number down for that day.
     
  6. MrsHoot

    MrsHoot Comrade

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    Jun 23, 2010

    Oh! That's easy enough, thanks for your input!!
     
  7. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    Jun 23, 2010

    Giving extrinsic rewards and/or consequences to a first grader is one thing.

    Getting them to remember why they got that reward or consequence is something else.
     
  8. love+logicworks

    love+logicworks New Member

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    Jun 24, 2010

    I don't think Love and Logic uses reward systems, except maybe for small group, special needs situations.
    It's more about how to use your words and tone of voice.
     
  9. flowerpower31

    flowerpower31 Comrade

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    Jun 25, 2010

    This is pretty much what I do. I have a pocket chart and each student has a pocket. The pockets have cards in this order in them: green, yellow, blue, red. All the kids start the day on green. If I have to talk to someone too much, he/she changes his/her card to yellow and that's a final warning. Blue is 5 minutes of recess; red is all of recess. If it goes further than that, it's a call/note home. I also have incentive charts for them. At the end of the day, I give stickers to each child who stayed on green and he/she puts the sticker on his/her own chart. Once a row on the chart is filled, he/she gets a ticket and, after three tickets, gets to pick a prize from the prize box (just stuff like Dollar Tree toys, McDonald's toys, pencils, party favor-type things, etc.).
     
  10. MrsHoot

    MrsHoot Comrade

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    Jun 25, 2010

    Yes, Love and Logic does not use a reward system or a specific consequence system.

    I personally need something more concrete, because my problem is that I don't have lots of experience with different behaviors and scenarios so I don't know how to always logically respond to them. Some scenarios are pretty simple to think about, but some are more complicated.

    I would prefer not to do extrinsic, but I struggle with giving consequences to poor choices students may make and not doing anything for the students who are making good choices. My Co-op I remembered now, had them do lunch bunch in the classroom when they filled up their credit card.

    Thanks for telling me about your system flowerpower! That sounds like something that would work for me as well.
     
  11. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    Jun 26, 2010

    First, we have a school-wide system of rules and expectations that all students/teachers are to follow - we don't make up classroom rules, because that has been done for us.

    In addition to a five-grade card system similar to the one above, I have incentive charts taped to each desk. Daily conduct grades of A and B earn (2 and 1, respectively) stickers that are awarded each morning. In addition, if a student answers a particularly tough question, or if I see someone commit a random act of kindness, etc., I will spontaneously award a sticker or two. The charts I use have 26 spots for stickers. When a student's chart is full, they get to choose something from my "prize" suitcase, and it is all VERY suspenseful, as I am HUGELY hush-hush about what is in my case. It's almost a game, and ONLY the "winning" student is allowed to look inside the case that day (and the prizes change randomly, so they never know what's inside).
     

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