Behavior Plan suggestions please???

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by kmcole4, Jan 14, 2006.

  1. kmcole4

    kmcole4 Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2006

    Hi All~

    I am looking for some input on behaviors. I have 16 in my class and they have all been quite impulsive and blurty on the rug lately. This is my first year teaching--I have been an educational assistant for 6 years.
    I have one boy who is extremely fidgety--he clearly cannot control this. When on the rug or at tables, be it for five minutes or fifteen minutes, he is a 'skuch'. He touches everything--around him. The things on the wall, on the rug, on the table, and even doodles on the rug or table with his fingers. I have approached this in many different ways and since I feel he cannot control it I do not want to turn this into a negative--as far as disciplining him--I do not want to be harsh. I have moved seats at tables and on the rug, I have given him choices of where to sit, I have tried simple gestures to cue him, and I have tried visuals.
    He is a delightful little boy with a wonderful sense of humor and a personality that draws people to him. He loves school and his friends and everyone loves him. His academics are at grade level--for now, but I feel when he gets to first grade his distractibility is going to impact him in an extreme way. I worked in first grade last year as an aide and I am familiar with the expectations--I am looking for a behavior plan for him--one that is intrinsic not extrinsic--I don't want to do a reward system as far as chips or tokens that are earned for a prize or reward at home--I feel that singles him out and doesn't come from within.
    Any suggestions or ideas would be greatly appreciated. The parents have been kept in the loop--and I know it will be difficult for them-- he is the oldest of three---I just want to try something new before I go forward with the next step--Thanks for your time!
     
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  3. jsai

    jsai New Member

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    Jan 14, 2006

    I have found that most children that are figity tend to feel like they have too much unproductive time on their hands so this has become a habitual factor (figitting). So, have you tried having him help you with things like passing out assignments, etc. Keeping him busy is good. Also, they like large spaces to draw or spread out there creativity. This tends to be an overwhelming situation at times especially when you feel out of options, so just listen to your heart and when you start to see even a hint of this coming then reverse the situation like, "Now, can you show me how well you can stand in line with your hands behind your back." Or whatever the situation may be. Most of all, always, always compliment even with a tiny bit of unity."
     
  4. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Jan 14, 2006

    well, I think we're all a little motivated from outside factors and it's hard for little guys to do it all just because it makes them feel like a good person on the inside. Hopefully, you can plant the seed to help your kiddos to begin to be movtivated without rewards, etc. but to be honest, I still like a little pat on the back now and then from my prinicipal and co-workers.

    Anyway, I'd suggest incorporating more movement activities, hands-on, discovery type learning if you haven't already. I find I am constantly having to sing, dance, and move for my kids to stay focused (14 boys- 6 girls in class). If something's not working in my room, I sit back and look to see if I need to change or modify my expectations....

    As far as a behavior plan,find what motivates him. It may have to be a home-school motivator. I know you don't want him to be singled out or anything, but it sounds like he is already and you've got to help him control his wiggles before entering first grade where the wiggles aren't as accepted.
     
  5. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jan 14, 2006

    As has been mentioned before, does he have some kind of allowable fidget thing? Something tiny and squishy would be good. Let him kmow that it is his alone, is not a toy to be shared, when it is appropriate to be used, and why. Merely whispering to him when you see him use it appropriately would be good feedback.
     
  6. Mable

    Mable Enthusiast

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    Jan 14, 2006


    Saw the neatest squishy ball through http://www.stevespangler.com science. A tactile treat- I couldn't stop playing with it. Probably too "fun" to allow for a student to have though......
     
  7. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Jan 14, 2006

    At Big Lots I get packs of about 5 squishy heads with a bit of yarn hair. They aren't gooey but almost like densely filled bean bags - but only 1/2 inch tall. You can squish the heads and nobody can even see them.
     
  8. kmcole4

    kmcole4 Rookie

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    Jan 18, 2006

    Thanks for the great ideas~

    I am meeting with his mom tommorrow to touch base more formally!
     
  9. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Jan 19, 2006

    I have a 4 year old who is like this and I have found she gets very over stimulated easily.
     
  10. edukidds

    edukidds Rookie

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    Jan 20, 2006

    Wow! I wish I had 16 students! I have 26 students this year I In Chicago, I could have up to 32 before they open a new class) and one severely "fidgety" boy. He cannot sit for 3 minutes ... he's up and running around, sliding on his belly on the floor to the door, swinging his arms like a windmill, bugging the other kids, SHOUTING out - all while I'm trying to teach.

    I have tried ignoring the behavior (when he's not being too disruptive) and it works - sometimes.

    I have taken away privileges such as bikes at recess, time-outs (where he does work/an activity ALONE - otherwise he will get up and walk around), and I have asked him to leave an activity when he is being disruptive.

    I have implemented a lot of positive strategies in my classroom to encourage positive behavior ... I am hoping that this will pay off the longterm. I also find that pointing out a child who is doing the right thing "I love how Annie is sitting on the rug" makes the other kids more quiet than yelling at the kids who are not good.

    1) Tree of Kindness (a tree painted on a bulletin board or made of paper - branches ONLY, the kids earn leaves when they are caught being KIND, and put their names on them which are then stuck on the tree)
    2) Coins that say "I've been caught being good" - I give them out at any time of day, when I catch a kid being good.
    3) Weekly prizes from my "school store" - they earn a prize for 3, 4, or 5 days of good behavior.

    He is relentless, but I feel something is really wrong with him - he cannot control himself (moving, shouting, etc.) and he needs help. Luckily, he is a bright student. I am currently trying to get him some services.

    Hope this helps! :D
     
  11. Youngteacher226

    Youngteacher226 Enthusiast

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    Jan 20, 2006

    kmcole4, one quick suggestion, a reward system doesn't have to be for one child, like you don't have to single him out, do the reward system for the WHOLE class. This will make the restless kids want to be recognized for good behavior and this will make the okay kids get the other kids to do better. Try it, it can't hurt, it can only help.:D
     
  12. Jumama

    Jumama Rookie

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    Jan 24, 2006

    A great trick I learned years ago was to allow my kids to "finger Knit". It keeps them from zooming around the tables and is GReat for fine motor development.
     
  13. KimberlyBest

    KimberlyBest Comrade

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    Jan 27, 2006

    Hey, I have this same child in my room! Unfortunately, he does get singled out - by the other children. It's very hard to not 'notice'. His mother and I have come up with a few things we are trying, I remind him that his hands are to be on his own body or on "Patience" (a stuffed frog he keeps with him so that he can touch it instead of another student). If I have to call him down for touching another student (usually wants to "pet" others or sometimes push them - his actions span from mild to wild) - I give him two choices - "You may either keep your hands to yourself or sit on them for 1 minute". This sitting on his hands really seems to help at times. He is more cognizant that his hands are the culprit. When I'm teaching and he starts wiggling I cross my hands over my chest as a reminder.

    This particular student also hurts others at times - he has no idea what "hurt" means though. He doesn't make the connection that if I headbutt you it will cause pain. We are working with him daily. One policy I do have is - if he causes himself or another student to be in danger he is gone for the day. Unfortunately, his Mom is at her wits end on what to do with him too. I feel bad sending him home because the poor lady is doing everything she can to help him (he is allergic to EVERYTHING! was born early with problems, born in to a marriage with parents who could not get along - they are now divorced with no help from Dad, etc.)
     

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