Behavior management in the intermediate grades

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Miss G, Jul 11, 2012.

  1. Miss G

    Miss G Rookie

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    Jul 11, 2012

    I am moving from first grade to fourth grade and am struggling with an appropriate behavior/reward system. In first grade I had a whole class group and an individual reward systems in place. I am struggling with the individual system. I used the color-coded cards in the first grade, but I don't know that it would be appropriate for
    4th grade. Please help!
     
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  3. cmw

    cmw Groupie

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    Jul 11, 2012

    When I taught 4th I used those mini incentive charts. Students earned stamps and could turn them in for rewards.
    5 stamps=gumball
    10 stamps=prize box
    other prizes were sit by a friend, computer pass, homework pass, etc...

    I've currently use a ticket system that I like. Students earn those raffle tickets. they put their name on it & it goes in a bag. I do drawings twice a week. Students have a list of things to choose from including prize box, candy jar, siting by a friend, sit in a beanbag, positive call home, etc..
    Additionally students can keep some tickets and save them instead of turning them all in. That way they can save up for particular things they want. :D
     
  4. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Jul 11, 2012

    I try to avoid incentives (3rd grade) as I feel at that age they should be adhering classroom expectations because that is what you are supposed to do and not to earn a prize.

    I do have students write notes home if they are demonstrating inappropriate behaviors. I think it is important for them to do so because it allows them to take ownership and let's parents know in their words what happened so they don't go home with a different story.

    Enjoy 4th! That's a big jump. You'll love the independence.
     
  5. Jlyn07

    Jlyn07 Comrade

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    Jul 11, 2012

    I used something similar to cmw and my fourth graders were always excited when it was time for them to pick a prize. I only gave them stickers when they were exceptionally good though, just meeting the expectations wouldn't get them a sticker.
     
  6. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Jul 11, 2012

    This is what I do, too, and for the same reasons...
     
  7. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jul 11, 2012

    In terms of the comments about not using incentives, keep in mind that sometimes we have to work toward the "shoulds." While it might be ideal that kids follow expectations simply because they should, that doesn't mean they will. Incentives can be a part of a plan to move kids toward compliance with expectations, including compliance "simply because" as opposed to get getting a reward.

    I usually bring this next point up in similar discussions, so sorry if others have heard it, but there are many times in life - even as adults - when we do things for multiple reasons, some "higher level" and some not. For example, every teacher goes to work with the expectation that they will get a tangible reinforcement in the form of a paycheck. That doesn't mean they aren't also going to work because they like what they do, but they also like (and demand) their paycheck.
     
  8. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Jul 11, 2012

    With or without incentives, some kids will follow expectations and some won't, and none will all the time, or never. I guess the point above is that more will more often if given an incentive?
     
  9. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Jul 12, 2012

    One point is that incentives have the ability to increase compliance. Not automatically or necessarily, but potentially.

    A larger point, though, is that incentives don't automatically have to be at odds with promoting behavior for other purposes too. It's possible to set up a system in which kids earn a variety of types of reinforcement for positive behavior, from tangible reinforcement and social praise to a deeper satisfaction of being a productive member of a community.
     

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