Behavior management idea- thoughts?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Eat_sleep_teach, Jul 20, 2014.

  1. Eat_sleep_teach

    Eat_sleep_teach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2014

    Hi! I'm new to posting on forums, but I have a behavior management idea that I would like some feedback about. This will be my first year teaching (first grade). I have had a lot of experience in classrooms, and many teachers in my school use the "stoplight" method. While this can work for some, I also see a lot of negative about it. Mostly everyday the same students are on red. It is embarrassing for them and it does not change the behaviors. So, on my journey this summer of putting my classroom together I've been trying to think of a management system that isn't too complicated, and does not require a ton of attention. After doing some research I've combined a few ideas to something I think could work. I would like some feedback from experienced teachers on what you think....

    Each child starts with 2 tickets velcro-ed to their desk. Tickets are laminated and have their student # on them. If they do not follow a rule they have to put their ticket in my bin on my desk. They may earn up to 3 tickets a day. At the end of the day, however many tickets they have left is how many punches they get on their punch card (Possibly my assistant could do this). If a student loses all of their tickets they must fill out a paper saying "I lost all of my tickets today because..." And explain why- this will be sent home in their folder. After they get 20 punches they may choose from the reward cards (lunch with teacher, choose a seat, no socks day, show and tell, etc.)


    I appreciate any feedback!!
     
  2.  
  3. divey

    divey Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2014

    I like your idea! I use a four color system where students move their names according to their behavior, either up or down. One question I have is, when students put the ticket that has their student number on it, will that ticket stay in the bin through the end of the day? Also, when you say that they may earn up to three tickets a day, is that even if they've put tickets in the bin? I guess what I'm wondering is would it be possible for a student to have a ticket in the bin, and yet still end the day with three tickets? How would you document that...that they had a stumble, but overall had a good day?
     
  4. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    15

    Jul 20, 2014

    It seems overly complicated and the same kids will lose their tickets everyday, just like the same ones ended on red everyday with the other teachers' system. However, complicated works for some people.

    And most 1st graders aren't going to be able to write what they did wrong. Some can't even verbalize it. I taught K last year, and I had a student that couldn't answer 'why' in any context.
     
  5. Eat_sleep_teach

    Eat_sleep_teach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2014

    Thank you for your feedback! I guess what I'm thinking is the students would have the opportunity to earn their tickets back- and also have the chance to earn an additional one for up to 3 tickets max. I'm just trying to think of something that isn't a clip chart, but also isn't complicated.
     
  6. Eat_sleep_teach

    Eat_sleep_teach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2014

    I appreciate your feedback. What system do you use that works for you?
     
  7. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2003
    Messages:
    6,699
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jul 20, 2014

    I think all our K teachers use some version of the colored cards. What they've shared in meetings about it is that they want something instant and visual for the kids. From 1st up we have behavior sheets that we mark behavior on. Our 1st grade teachers give a daily behavior grade, the rest of us give weekly. The kids start with a 100 and lose points for infractions.
     
  8. divey

    divey Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2004
    Messages:
    228
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2014

    In both my system and the system in the original post (it seems), students have the opportunity to move their names back to green/earn tickets throughout the day. Very rarely do I have students that end the day on red, but when they do, the consequences I use are effective in curbing their unwanted behavior. I want my students to understand that even if they make a mistake, they are in control of their choices and can work towards a better day!

    I disagree that young students are unable to verbalize what they have done to lose a ticket/move their name. I have used this system with both 2nd graders and kindergartens, and at the end of the day I always have conversations with each child who is not on green. Although they may not want to tell me what they did to move their name, it is very rare when they don't remember what inappropriate choice they made.
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    15

    Jul 20, 2014

    I don't like public displays at all.* I was forced to use a clip chart in K last year because I took over mid-year and the parents had a fit when I tried to switch to Class Dojo.

    In 2nd grade I used a classroom economy with great success.

    I've used an economy in 5th, as well as a punch card when we switched classes(similar to a sticker chart).

    In 1st, I simply carried around a clip chart and would take notes. At recess (end of the day), some kids had to sit out a few minutes and we had a discussion about their behavior.



    *I hate public displays for several reasons. First of all, it is not anyone's business. Secondly, it becomes the entire focus of the day. In the few months where I was trapped into a clip chart, the first thing discussed when parents picked their kids up is 'what color were you on today?" After that, they went into a discussion. "Billy was on red today. But he is always on red. Today he ______. Hailey was on yellow. She got in trouble for _____." I want the discussions to be about what they learned every day! Not to mention, when I run into a parent, I always hear, "I don't want Sally near Billy. He is always in trouble." No one cares that Billy is a good kid with ADHD whose parents won't medicate. His impulses are out of control.
     
  10. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    7,075
    Likes Received:
    15

    Jul 20, 2014


    You must be very lucky to always get such exceptional students. I wish you would have met a few of mine.

    About half of my K kids would simply answer "Because I am bad" or "Because I was bad" when asked why they had a consequence. That is not an acceptable answer to me. But they really couldn't tell me. One of my very brightest (1st grade math with ease, fluently read on 2nd grade level) could not answer why in any context. He is not there developmentally. And to ask him to WRITE it and not verbalize it will not happen for a long while.
     
  11. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2009
    Messages:
    1,136
    Likes Received:
    165

    Jul 20, 2014

    I'm so over visual behavior management systems. The school I was in last year used the love and logic approach and honestly it was easy to be consistent with it. I plan to implement it this year for sure.
     
  12. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

    Joined:
    May 29, 2007
    Messages:
    3,061
    Likes Received:
    539

    Jul 20, 2014


    I couldn't agree more!!! I want parents to be interested in the LEARNING that is going on in the classroom. If I have concerns about a specific child's behavior I will contact THAT child's parents once I notice a pattern. Daily behavior logs only encourage a focus on behavior and 99.9% of kids don't need the focus to be on their behavior. Also, doesn't everyone deserve an 'off day' every once and a while without getting parents involved?

    Your system seems very complicated and time consuming, but I'm not one for 'systems'.... I can't keep up with them. I need simple and sweet or I can't be consistent. And the key to any behavior management philosophy, system, whatever is CONSISTENCY.

    In grade 1, I specifically teach rules, routines and procedures at the beginning of the year. Anyone who has difficulty with routines and procedures gets to practice, practice, practice at a time that's convenient for ME (usually recess... it's quite effective). Anyone who has difficulty following the rules is dealt with quickly and quietly - a logical consequence is given and then we all move on. I only report to parents once I notice a pattern with behavior or an increasing frequency of infractions and then when I meet with parents it's to discuss proactive strategies we can ALL take to help support the child.
     
  13. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,726
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 21, 2014

    I agree about the public display and admire you for seeking an alternative. However, I do see problems with the tickets. My biggest concern would be that it would be something for them to play with and be distracted. The "walk of shame" to put the tickets on your desk could cause issues with the parents. Also it does seem challenging to manage.

    Last year I did not use a behavior chart/incentive program as a whole class. I simply addressed behaviors as they arose and contacted parents as needed. Two students who needed more guidance had personal behavior plans. It worked very well.
     
  14. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2010
    Messages:
    6,396
    Likes Received:
    2,252

    Jul 21, 2014

    You took the words out of my mouth.
     
  15. missrebecca

    missrebecca Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    318
    Likes Received:
    10

    Jul 21, 2014

    One of my mentor teachers who taught 1st grade did something similar... she had a classroom money system where students earned two "owl bucks" every day just by showing up. They could save them to eventually spend on a monthly class store, OR if they had bad behavior, one owl buck would be taken away at a time. The money was kept in a plastic baggie in the student's desk.

    I'd be worried about students seeing the visual reminder of missing tickets directly on their desk, and having defense mechanisms/more bad behavior take place. That was my experience with clip charts. Plus, they might become a toy or distraction.
     
  16. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 3, 2010
    Messages:
    3,371
    Likes Received:
    814

    Jul 21, 2014

    I like your idea. The one thing I would make sure is that the tickets are large enough as not to get easily lost. You don't want your disorganized boys to be frustrated with this system.
     
  17. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2011
    Messages:
    2,096
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jul 21, 2014

    While I agree with some of what you've said, if Billy is always in trouble- no matter what system you're using kids are going to go home and tell their parents. The kids don't need to see Billy on red to pick up on what goes on in the classroom. Unless you never, ever speak to Billy about his behavior and no one ever sees Billy do anything wrong, the kids know.
     
  18. Eat_sleep_teach

    Eat_sleep_teach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2014
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2014

    Thank you all for your feedback! I do see complications in this system. It's hard to come up with an idea that is not public or complicated. Since mostly all teachers in my school use the stoplight method, I think it scares me to try to start the year without some kind of "system". While I would prefer to start without one, and see if there are students who may need an individual plan.
     
  19. Loomistrout

    Loomistrout Devotee

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2007
    Messages:
    1,192
    Likes Received:
    197

    Jul 21, 2014

    Tickets, cards, charts, stoplights etc. certainly look impressive and give the illusion something is being done about discipline. Odds are it is not a chart which is driving behavior. It is more likely a teacher using a clip chart and swears it is working has built the chart upon sound fundamentals. It's structure which MissScrimmage alluded to which makes the chart work. Then again, if one does an effective job with structure the teacher becomes the "system" and there is no need to spend important planning time running off Lucky Bucks.

    Consider two attributes of an effective management system:

    1) It should increase cooperation and time on task
    2) It should reduce the teacher's workload

    Perhaps you have seen a teacher during your schooling who was able to "look" a student back to work. Maybe you were present when a teacher was directing a lesson and, noticing two students talking, abruptly stopped mid-sentence, turned towards the students as if to say, "'This lesson is not continuing until that behavior stops", and a quiet stillness fell over the room. In these cases there are no things to give out or take away. There are no clips to move or cards to turn. The system is in place because the teacher walked into the room.

    If you really want to reward kids consider advice from Michael Linsin (Smart Classroom Management). He argues kids should get rewards for doing nothing, just being kids. As they come in from recess give everyone a pencil. If they ask, "What for?", say "For being in my class."
     
  20. IdahoSpEdTeach

    IdahoSpEdTeach Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2014
    Messages:
    16
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 22, 2014

    I agree.... public shaming is not OK. That's what happens with the stop light system. The kids all know who struggles behaviorally. Some kids need different standards (here's the Special Ed teacher in me coming out!). If a kiddo can't sit still for two minutes, then he needs different discipline than the child who is a lump in his desk. Both kids aren't getting work done, but if you discipline student A for moving too much, then you should also discipline the student B who isn't doing anything at all.....

    Know what I mean? I love the little check sheets taped to the desk at the beginning of the day. The child has a list of behaviors that are expected and how they met/didn't meet each of the goals. You can break it down by class period, morning vs. afternoon, day of the week...... it's flexible and visual - which is critical for kids that need behavior modification. Remember to give lots of kudos at the start and gradually wean them away. Over "attaboy" at the start. Also, teach the correct behavior and make sure you catch them being good, or catch multiple people being good. You can have a space on the check sheet for what they are working for - if you have a token economy. You can send these little check sheets home to parents. They are also excellent to keep in a CYA file. Date them, write notes on them, then if you have parents come in and say, "My darling is Perfect!" you have some ammunition.

    Good luck!
     
  21. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2001
    Messages:
    24,959
    Likes Received:
    2,116

    Jul 22, 2014

    :thumb:
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. North Fork
Total: 212 (members: 1, guests: 196, robots: 15)
test