Behavior Management for High School English

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Cme10, Oct 6, 2013.

  1. Cme10

    Cme10 Rookie

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    Oct 6, 2013

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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Oct 6, 2013

    Thinking about high schools in general, and high school age students, consider the following, as you might encounter them:
    - profanity and language
    - restroom
    - staying in seat
    - talking
    - consequences / warning system
     
  4. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    Oct 6, 2013

    These are the rules that I have used for years:
    1. Listen to and follow directions the first time they are given.
    2. Be on time with all required materials.
    3. Be respectful of people and property. (Keep hands, feet, and negative comments to yourself. Don't touch other people's belongings.)
    4. Sit and remain in your seat unless told to do otherwise.
    5. Follow the school rules at all times.
     
  5. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 6, 2013

    Our school policy is that we practice Order, Respect and Civility at all times.

    That's it. No other rules really necessary.

    I think that if you're too specific, it becomes a game of trying to stay within the letter of the law but still drive the "new teacher" crazy. Don't fall for it. They're in high school... they know how to behave.

    And I would avoid the whole "how many minutes in can we hit the bathroom" quagmire. Because if a kid needs to throw up with 8 minutes left, he NEEDS to leave.

    Instead, consider saying that any kid who needs to leave your room to use the restroom needs to make up the time he misses, that afternoon after school. The kids who don't really have to go will tend to not want to stay after, but the kids who NEEDS to go won't care what you ask him to do if you'll only let him leave.
     
  6. Cme10

    Cme10 Rookie

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    Oct 8, 2013

    Thank you for all the suggestions! I have compiled a list of rules and procedures with your help, tomorrow will be implementation time!
     
  7. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Oct 9, 2013

    My school's policy is no restroom use the first 10 or last 10 minutes of the period.
     
  8. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Oct 9, 2013

    This is how it was at my HS as well.
     
  9. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Oct 10, 2013

    Don't block the door. A physical confrontation is not appropriate and will not help you. All it takes it one student saying that you touched them and things get chaotic.

    You're right about working bell-to-bell though. Honestly I wouldn't give that whole "young adults" speech, though. It will put them on the defensive. I would just keep them working and the moment one person tries to stand, asl them to sit back down until the bell has rung.

    If they walk out again, follow whatever discipline procedures your school has in place.

    By the way, what grade is this that you've instituted a strict "no late work" policy on?
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 10, 2013

    Yep, I agree on every point.

    And be careful about strict, all encompassing rules of any sort. At some point, an exception is bound to come along.

    I honestly think things work far better with broad rules than with strict, specific ones.
     
  11. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Oct 10, 2013

    Wow. That's quite a judgment to pass on children you just met. I also teach lower-ability 9th graders in a high poverty area. As a first year teacher (esp in a high poverty area), I realize you have very high expectations of how things are supposed to work, but as time goes on, I think you'll see most of these children need structure and limits, but understanding and support as well. Please try not to make decisions based on your impression that they're "lazy."

    Also, this is a high poverty area and you're expecting all of the parents to be able to email you prior to an emergency/issue? I think you may be surprised at not only the lack of technology at home, but often the lack of parental guidance/support. Try not to hold that against the student.
     
  12. live

    live Companion

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    Oct 10, 2013

    :yeahthat:

    It's no coincidence that often my "laziest" students are actually just struggling to understand the material or have something upsetting going on at home.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 14, 2013

    Talk to some of the other teachers of the same kids. (If you're on Power School, you can pull up an individual student schedule and see who else they have.) See how more experienced teachers handle those kids.

    Are any of them on sports? A chat with the coach can sometimes work wonders.

    As far as the bathroom goes, consider calling home, to ensure that there's no medical issue. Make it sincere. I would imagine that will stop some of the bathroom abuse.

    Wait, you don't have a seating chart yet?? That's a HUGE first priority. You need to learn the names, you need to be able to take attendance, you need them to know you know who and where they were on a particular day should you need that information. it's not about being mature or immature, it's about your ability to ascertain who was where, should something get broken or someone get hurt. sorry, non-negotiable in my book.

    As to coming in late, do you take attendance every period? Speak to whoever is in charge of attendance and ask what happens. At the very least, they should be registering as "tardy" and at some point it should be an administrative issue.

    As to this:
    Make no mistake... they're very capable of picking up on you attitude. They realize that you dislike them. It's not helping anything.
     
  14. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 15, 2013

    The seating chart isn't just about knowing names. It's about accountablity-- you know who was where when a problem arose. And, far more important, they realize that you know. That heads off a lot of problems, from bullying to graffiti.


    On October 6, you posted:
    You've known them for one week.

    If a teacher had known my child for a week, and labeled him or her "coddled...low ability, and lazy to boot" I wouldn't exactly be feeling the warm fuzzies. And I would be concerned about that teacher's ability to determine my child's strengths and failings.


    How does any of that translate to "low abiltiy"? How have you even had a chance to determine their abilities, after a single week of teaching them? It seems to me that you've listed a host of reasons why these kids haven't been adequately prepared, regardless of their actual abilities.

    I didn't correct your error to be nasty, honest...heaven knows I make more than my share of errors here. It was to highlight the problem with first impressions. At this point, that's all you have: a series of first impressions.

    The best of luck to you.
     
  15. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Oct 15, 2013

    :yeahthat: And every other word from Alice. Whole-hearted agreement.
     

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