Behavior Issue

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by zoobteach, Sep 20, 2009.

  1. zoobteach

    zoobteach New Member

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    Sep 20, 2009

    Any suggestions or ideas to help a child who throws a HUGE tantrum when breaking a rule and given a consequence? Screaming louder than you'd think humanly possible, stomping feet, shaking with anger, kicking chairs, crying, saying no, negotiating.
     
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  3. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Sep 20, 2009

    NO! :D Just kidding!:lol:
    I had to deal with one of these kids.
    I had a toy that he LOVED to play with. I made it his goal to work for it. He had to follow the rules, stop throwing fits in order to use it. It's a bribery BUT it worked. It kept him focused & I stayed :cool:.
    Rebel1
     
  4. KLSSwimmer

    KLSSwimmer Habitué

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I tell the child that I am choosing to ignore his/her behavior until he/she can act like a kindergarten student. Then, as a class, we truly do ignore their behavior. Eventually, they figure out that this doesn't work.
     
  5. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Sep 20, 2009

    The tantrum obviously works at home so you have to make sure it doesn't work at school so the behavior diminishes. I haven't found that deferred gratification or bribery works because they are going on raw emotion. KLSSwimmer has good ideas. If needed I physically pick up the child and put him in another part of the room so it is easier to ignore. If I have an extra person I put him on the grass outside. Talk about it when he is calm and make sure he NEVER gets ANYTHING he wants if he has behaved like that. The less talking when he is upset the better. The one I had last year desperately wanted to be at school and mom didn't work so I would call mom to pick her up. After a couple of times doing that she got the message and would still pout etc. but didn't have the huge kicking, screaming thing.
     
  6. TeacherC

    TeacherC Connoisseur

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I agree with ignoring the behavior as much as possible- although it sounds like it might get violent (the kicking, etc)- if you have an extra person that can monitor him (but ignore him) when he is having his tantrums that would help. I would also make sure that you are talking to mom- see if she can start to ignore this behavior at home as well; working together will help him get the idea faster!!
     
  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I move the furniture and anything else that he can hurt himself on and let him go at it! We learn to ignore and eventually it stops. Then you have the teachable moment to explain why that behavior is unacceptable and why there will be no privileges forthcoming for students who behave like that.
     
  8. mom2sands

    mom2sands Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I had one of those kids last year. Eventually I learned to ignore him when he was falling out in the floor, kicking and screaming. He would actually look to see if anyone was paying attention. The class also learned to ignore him. I have another one this year. He gets irritated when someone is looking at him, yet he only continues if there is an argument. He will also argue with you forever if you let him. He always has a comeback and I just halt it with no or stop. I usually have to say it three or four times and then he realizes that I will not argue with him and he gives up.
     
  9. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I had a student not quite like yours but she just got out of control and couldnt keep to herself. So I put a big square on the floor using tape. I told her she needed to go to the square and stay there until she was ready to join kindergarten. I never watched the clock I would have her go there, work it out and then she could join us when she was ready. At first it was not pretty but eventually, she would go there jump 20 times and be ready to come back.

    With your little one, maybe talk to him about it when he isn't in a fit. Tell him that you know he can't control his actions right now but you need him to show you how to be at school. When he gets upset give him a place to go and work it out on his own. Then practice it when he isn't upset. Reward him for getting it right. Then when he does blow up, hopefully he will know what to do!

    On paper that sounds so easy, good luck, because I know it is HARD! Hang in there.
     
  10. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Sep 20, 2009

    [On paper that sounds so easy, good luck, because I know it is HARD! Hang in there.[/QUOTE]

    So true...so true...
     
  11. zoobteach

    zoobteach New Member

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    Sep 20, 2009

    Thanks everyone! I do know that this behavior goes on at home. I hope the parents will work with me or I fear it will be 10x more difficult to stop. What I think is happening is that it works at home after a few minutes, but I won't give in, so the behavior is continuing with the hope that I will cave. We had a tantrum that lasted about 2 hours last week with a couple breaks here and there. I've never experienced that!
     
  12. jeifer

    jeifer Rookie

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    Sep 20, 2009

    I've had students like this too. I have one that is like that this year. He just got moved to my room (a month into school because we lost a K unit). The teacher gave into him. When he was moved to my room, I was told I couldn't do "anything negative or punishment" it must be all "positive" because he goes bonkers...if he chooses not to follow the rules he does have the same consequences like everyone else. After a few days he figured out he cannot act like that with me because it doesn't work.

    I know it may seem tough at first but if you do like others have said and ignore the behavior and definately not argue or make comments while they are upset, they'll figure out you aren't going to put up with it. Even if it continues at home they will figure out its different in the classroom. It might take a few days but they'll figure it out.

    With my student, while he does have the same consequences as everyone else, he is on his own positive reward system. He gets a bracelet every morning and each time he is caught being good he gets a sticker no matter where we are in school. After 5 stickers he gets 5 mins of free choice by himself. It has helped some. I do have to answer questions from the other children but I always explain that we are helping / encouraging him to be good and that they get to do a lot of fun stuff that he does not. It seems to always work every year. I do phase it out after a couple of weeks.
     
  13. mom2sands

    mom2sands Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2009

    Funny thing is that this year's issue is related by blood to last year's issue!!
     
  14. TeacherC

    TeacherC Connoisseur

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    Sep 22, 2009

    Interesting how that seems to happen quite often...:haha:
     

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