behavior help please (long)

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by mrsnoble116, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. mrsnoble116

    mrsnoble116 Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 30, 2013

    I have a 1st grade boy (who is the age of a 2nd grader), who I assume has Autism. Currently he's DD and going through the eval process. He's in my Mi/Mod room because he's on an interim IEP.

    I have 9 kids with varying exceptionalities; SLD, Down's, Autism. I have 4 moderate and 4 mild and him.

    He has limited school experience because mom "home schooled" him. He is smart and understands concepts very quickly. But when he is asked to complete something, he has to be reminded to stay on task. He wanders around the room, plays with whatever he wants. If he doesn't get his way, he whines, cries, screams, will say threatening things, throw, kick objects, attempt to hit staff (but it's a threat).

    I have put him in timeout but don't really know what other punishments to enforce since this is done in the middle of my teaching and he's taking away from my other students.

    My entire class needs 1 on 1 and I have me and 2 paras. The child monopolizes one para and when he doesn't listen to her, I intervene. Meanwhile I'm teaching and also providing individual/group instruction.

    We took a spelling test today and it was horrendous. I had 3 groups of kids (different levels) and him by himself.

    If I had a class of behavior only kids it would be different but I need some tricks with a very behavior mild class and his extreme behaviors.

    I'm doing 2 interventions right now that are complete classwork with no more than 3 prompts and stay in assigned area/raise hand to get up. What I need is a quick consequence/punishment, for times when he has been given warnings and chances and he still won't comply.

    thanks
     
  2.  
  3. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,934
    Likes Received:
    1,916

    Aug 30, 2013

    Could you reduce the classwork that needs to be completed before a preferred activity (reward) takes place? For example, if the student completes one problem or question or section of an assignment, then he gets 3 minutes to do an activity of his choice. You could set a timer that he can see so that he can keep track of his time. When the timer goes off, he completes another section, and you continue in this manner.

    When he chooses not to complete his work, have a consequence that is meaningful to him. I can't give you ideas since I don't know the student. You'll have to find out what his preferences are for activities and tangible items. It could be recess, a game, a snack, a drink, or anything else motivating to the student. Not being able to participate in a lesson or instructional activity (time-out) may mean nothing to him, and therefore it is an ineffective consequence.

    It's been recommended to me by our autism program coordinator that I implement a visual schedule of alternating preferred and non-preferred activities with students like the one you describe. Frequent positive-reinforcement for appropriate behaviors is another idea.

    It can also be a good idea to offer choices to students like this. For example, you may say something like, "You can choose to do your work and get to go to recess, or you can choose to wander around the room during work time and then stay in for recess later this afternoon." I'm generally not one who likes to take away recess. However, I have one student who is non-compliant, and recess is the only thing I've been able to come up with that works. She wants to go to recess, and, when I phrase like I just did, she just about always chooses to do her work so that she can go to recess.

    Good luck! I know you said it'd be different if you had a room full of behaviors, but I actually think you're pretty lucky you only have the one.
     
  4. mrsnoble116

    mrsnoble116 Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 31, 2013

    Thanks, I am lucky to only have one. I was a teacher of ED/BD kids and it's a different mind-set to have all behaviors vs. all academics and one behavior. It's hard juggling the academics and the behavior.

    I finally got color ink so now I can get started on the icons for the schedule.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. tigger88
Total: 243 (members: 2, guests: 216, robots: 25)
test