Becoming an elementary school teacher

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Ms.SLS, Jul 2, 2013.

  1. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

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    Jul 2, 2013

    My husband wants to become an elementary school teacher. He's worked as a paraeducator for years and at first, he was talking about going in to SPED. Now, he's decided he wants to do regular ed elementary.

    I am a secondary English teacher. I've been fortunate enough to be able to find jobs in this economy, and I think that he thinks because I have been able to do that, he will be able to do the same. He has been working at a district for years and does have contacts in the ed world, but I worry with the way things are, he won't actually be able to find a teaching job when the time comes.

    I know finding jobs these days is all about who you know, so maybe he does have more of a chance than I think he does. What do you guys think? Am I being paranoid?
     
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  3. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I think you are being realistic, especially being that you are in CA. It´s a tough market. However, if it´s something he really wants to do, then why not? Like you said, he already has contacts and has been a para for years now.
     
  4. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Why not do both? He'd have more options then. And personally, I think because he's a male he will has a higher chance of being hired - my school is desperate to higher males because we only have like 3 male teachers.
     
  5. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    He should see if he can get a dual degree in sped/childhood ed. Then he will have more options when it comes to finding a job.
     
  6. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

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    Is this really a thing? I've heard rumors it was, but I've never had solid proof.

    In CA, you have to do one credential at a time, so it would take like 3 years for him to get dual credentialed.
     
  7. bison

    bison Habitué

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    You're being rightfully cautious, but I'm in SoCal and men absolutely have an easier time being hired. It's not a rumor, ask an elementary P and they will tell you. He should be able to do a credential program part time except for the student teaching portion, so the time he would have to take off would work be minimal, likely no more than one semester. I wouldn't encourage most to do what he's doing (despite doing it myself) but as a man with experience and contacts within districts, he will do better than most. That's not to say it will be easy, and he needs to be realistic that he may not find a job right away. The only recent grads I know that have found jobs are the ones who know people that do hiring. It's annoying for those of us who don't have "connections" but it's just the way it is.
     
  8. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Honestly, he should only get certified in special education if he REALLY WANTS to teach special ed. I think that special ed requires a certain type of person, and it needs to be a person who is very passionate about teaching that particular population. My school practices full inclusion, and after having a student with very severe behaviors in my class this year (with a full time aide), I know I could NEVER do special ed. But more power to those who can! I just think it's not a job that you set out to do because it's easier to get a job in that field. Not saying your husband is trying to do that, I just wanted to caution against it.

    I got an elementary job in southern CA as a first year teacher with absolutely no connections. I had to move an hour away from my previous home, and I teach in a charter school, but it did happen!

    I agree with others - his contacts and his gender will be a HUGE asset in the job search.

    The part of California you're in also makes a big difference. The Bay Area and the mid Central Valley seem to have more jobs than other areas of the state. Southern California is quite possibly the toughest market.

    Anyway, I think it's tough, but it's not impossible. Also, I assume that since he still has to get his credential it will be over a year before he's ready to apply, and maybe things will be better by then? That's what I keep hoping, anyway!
     
  9. Ms.SLS

    Ms.SLS Cohort

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    We're up north, and the job market here is a bit better than SoCal for sure. He's been working with SPED (Mostly autistic and ED) kids for over 6 years and he does great with them, which is why he considered SPED in the first place, but people have been telling him horror stories about the paperwork (I have no idea if it's really that bad, or if it's just the normal level of complaining many teachers seem to do).
     
  10. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I don't know about CA specifically, but what he has heard about sped paperwork, in general, is correct. There is a lot of paperwork in sped. However, the rewards of working with the students do outweigh the burden of the paperwork. There is a lot of paperwork in the gen. ed. classroom, too. It's just a different kind. If he is really passionate about sped, he shouldn't let the paperwork deter him. :2cents:
     
  11. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Oh, I must have missed that!! If he has experience with SPED kids and likes it and could see himself doing it, I would say going for the SPED credential wouldn't be a bad idea! They are definitely two very separate credentials though, so getting both would take quite awhile.

    I have never taught SPED, but I think there's a lot of work no matter what you teach. It might just be a different kind of work. I think it would really depend the population he sees himself teaching.

    Best of luck to your husband! :)
     
  12. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Jul 2, 2013

    I feel like I got a few interviews for this reason, but certainly no job offers because of it.
     

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