bandnerdtx - say something question stems

Discussion in 'High School' started by dovian, Aug 20, 2007.

  1. dovian

    dovian Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2007
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 20, 2007

    Hi - I saw your posting on the teachers.net message boards (I am assuming it is you :)) I was wondering if you could send me the say something question stems you mentioned - I have 9th graders that need to learn how to discuss literature and that sounds like a great idea! Can you PM them to me? Thanks so much!
     
  2.  
  3. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Messages:
    3,506
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 20, 2007

    Yep, that was me! I keep my "handle" the same pretty much everywhere I go! LOL!

    Here you go!


    The following strategy is based on the work of Dr. Kylene Beers. The
    stems were adapted from the work of Jerome Harste. Please give credit to them when printing or distributing this information. Teachers rarely get acknowledged for what they do.

    Each card is a different color.

    Card 1 -- Ask a question
    Why did…
    What's this part about…
    How is this (fill in detail) like this (fill in detail)…
    What would happen if…
    Why…
    Who is…
    What does this section (fill in detail) mean…
    Do you think that…
    I don't this this part…

    Card 2 -- Make a comment
    This is good because…
    This is hard because…
    This is confusing because…
    I like the part where…
    I don't like this part because…
    My favorite part so far is…
    I think that…

    Card 3 -- Clarify something
    Oh, I get it…
    Now I understand…
    This makes sense now because…
    No, I think it means…
    I agree with you. This means…
    At first I thought (fill in detail), but now I think…
    This part is really saying…

    Card 4 -- Make a connection
    This reminds me of…
    This part is like…
    This character (fill in name) is like (fill in name) because…
    This is similar to…
    The differences are…
    I also (name something in the text that has happened to you)…
    I never (name something in the text that has never happened to you)…
    This character makes me think of…
    This setting reminds me of…

    Card 5 -- Make a prediction
    I predict that…
    I bet that…
    I think that…
    Since this happened (fill in detail), then I bet the next thing that is going to happen is…
    Reading this part makes me think that (fill in detail) is about to happen…
    I wonder if…

    Card 6 -- Scribble Silently (optional--I use this only after lots of
    practice with the other five cards)
    Read the selection.
    Locate the first place you would stop to say something.
    Now instead of saying something to your partner, scribble comments to yourself about the text.
    Use the other cards to remind you of possible ideas if you get stuck.
    Reread if you still can't scribble a comment.
     
  4. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Messages:
    3,506
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 20, 2007

    I thought maybe I should provide an explanation of the strategy! LOL! This is from another website.

    SAY SOMETHING: A READING STRATEGY
    Say Something is a simple reading strategy where students collaborate with a partner to read a selection and respond in various ways to what they read.

    INTRODUCTORY ACTIVITIES FOR SAY SOMETHING
    If teachers are concerned about the need for modeling prior to pair work, the class could work together first as a class.
    DIRECTIONS:
    1. Read the paragraph or assigned section.
    2. When you finish try to summarize the key points in writing without looking back at the text.
    3. Students take turns saying something to the class. Some possibilities are listed below, but students should be allowed to choose what they want to say. The list could be displayed to evoke ideas.
    · Summarize the section read.
    · Ask a question to clarify meaning of a word or idea.
    · Identify an important question that is answered by the passage.
    · Ask a reflective question prompted by the content.
    · Relate the content to a personal situation or real-life example.
    · React to the ideas in some way that reflects analysis or evaluation of the reading.
    Agree or disagree with the content or the author’s point of view.
    Discuss the style or logical development of the writer.
    Draw inferences from the reading.
    Compare or contrast this passage with other readings or ideas.
    Identify effective use of a writing skill.
    · Share a reading skill that was useful during the reading.
    · Predict what will follow in the next section to be read.
    After class modeling, students should be prepared to continue Say Something in pairs.
    During pair work active involvement and opportunities for language development are greatly enhanced. Pairs can share ideas following their interactions.

    NOTE: Initially teachers may select the passage, have students read it quietly, write if finished early, all pair, pairs share, then all read the next assigned section.

    Adapted by Jeanette Gordon, Illinois Resource Center

    (This site gives credit to Jeanette Gordon. She was never mentioned in my district's inservice, but I just cut and paste... so there she is!)
     
  5. dovian

    dovian Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2007
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 20, 2007

    Oh I love it. I have seen this idea floated around in professional development but your method seems like it would actually work in a class! Do you make one class set and recollect them, or do you make enough so that each student has her own?
     
  6. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Messages:
    3,506
    Likes Received:
    12

    Aug 20, 2007

    I make a class set, laminated and clipped together with one of those binder rings. The kids really do enjoy this activity. It keeps everyone involved.

    Here's how I introduce it. I make a chart with everyone's name on it and each of the five categories. Every kid lays out his/her cards in on the desk face up. We briefly look over all of the question types, and then I read a paragraph or two from a story. I tell them when I stop, they need to be prepared to ask a question. When they ask a question, they first tell me what's at the top of the card. For example, the kid says, "I'm going to Make a Comment..." then he makes a comment. I check off the "Make a Comment" box on my chart and he turns that card over. He can't "make a comment" again until he's done the other four cards. I let everyone respond ONCE at each break. If someone doesn't respond the first time or two, I don't say anything, but by the third break, if a kid is still silent, I'll say, "Okay, Mary, you haven't responded yet. Make sure you have something ready to say at the next stopping point." Then I'll call on Mary right away at the next break.

    As they get more familiar with the strategy, I loosen up and let them ask multiple questions and repeat types of questions. The goal is to get them to work together and ask relevant, valid questions on their own.

    This is honestly the most effective close reading strategy I've used (and administrators LOVE it when they are observing....)
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

    Joined:
    May 13, 2005
    Messages:
    29,742
    Likes Received:
    1,155

    Aug 20, 2007

    That's terrific!
     
  8. dovian

    dovian Comrade

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2007
    Messages:
    260
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 20, 2007

    That seems like it would really get everyone involved too, since they don't have to think of what kinds of things to say. I am taking a prof. dev. class where we are being encouraged to come up with inclusive activities like that - I think I will share it with that group if I get a chance. (The leaders' idea is "equality sticks", where you put each kid's name on a popsicle stick and pick at random to answer questions, but I feel that's too much like calling kids out.)
     
  9. mrswilson

    mrswilson Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 26, 2007

    This is awesome! Thanks for the great explanation. I am teaching two SPED inclusion English classes this year and I think this will really help to get the ideas flowing.

    THANKS!!
     
  10. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2002
    Messages:
    18,937
    Likes Received:
    680

    Aug 26, 2007

    This is wonderful, bandnerd. I'm going to pass it along to our middle school LA teacher. Thank you.
     
  11. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2007
    Messages:
    2,403
    Likes Received:
    1

    Sep 6, 2007

    I just want to update that I used this strategy today while reading 12 Angry Men and i LOVED it. It is the first thing I have tried in 6 years where I didn't have to pull teeth even once to get kids to participate, and they had really thoughtful things to say. LOVE IT.
     
  12. Weazy

    Weazy Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2007
    Messages:
    478
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 7, 2007

    I plan to give this a try, too!
     
  13. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2007
    Messages:
    3,506
    Likes Received:
    12

    Sep 7, 2007

    Let me know if I can help!
     
  14. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Messages:
    327
    Likes Received:
    0

    Sep 7, 2007

    Love this, bandnerd! I'll be using it for sure!
     
  15. englishteach7

    englishteach7 Companion

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2011

    I love this! I am going to use this in my classroom this year to spark meaningful discussions to improve deeper levels of reading comprehension.
     
  16. trulyunic

    trulyunic Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2012
    Messages:
    44
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 24, 2012

    Im glad I saw this post's link today!
    This is something that will work well in my FL class when reading our novels in the target language.

    Thanks for posting!
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 138 (members: 1, guests: 114, robots: 23)
test