b, p, d, q

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by SBP0429, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. SBP0429

    SBP0429 Rookie

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    Dec 15, 2011

    Does anyone have any ideas about how to teach students these letters, and remember them? I know this is just hard, but was looking for any ideas you might have??? Thanks!
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Dec 15, 2011

    Do you know the 'bed' trick?

    Also, if you make the point or a tail at the bottom of the q, it's less confusing. Truthfully I don't see many p q issues. More often it's b d...bed helps.
     
  4. christine89

    christine89 Companion

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    Dec 15, 2011

    Well one thing I have seen for b and d is using left and right "thumbs up" and saying a, b (left thumb up in front of you), c, d (right thumb up in front of you. However, this only works if you have the student do it themselves and use left hand first, then right. If they are in front of you and see you do it, it will look backwards and further confuse them. I have not personally used that method, but I just try to encourage remembering which way the "tummy" points. Other than that, I don't have any great tricks for this.
     
  5. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Dec 16, 2011

    May be too late for this for this year, but one thing is to make sure to introduce them separately, give them time to master one before the other, teach other letters in between, then teach the second of the pair. Of course, some (if not many) kids are going to have exposure to the other letter naturally, such as through sight words or previous instruction, but separating instruction of letters can help.

    Also, are you wondering in general for all kids, or do you have a particular student or two that is really struggling with it?

    Looking forward to reading other suggestions as well, including the ones above!
     
  6. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Dec 16, 2011

    Another idea is to provide sorting practice. Use a T chart and put the letter at the top. Talk about the features of the letter and then have find and sort them from a pile of printed letters. Review it with them and have them describe the shape and tell you the letter. I might only do it once a week or once every 2 weeks and make it a practice center activity. I wouldnt over stress it. I have lots of sorting activities we do all year long. By the end of the year, they get it. In the meantime, celebrate whatever success in that process you see.

    I also do not introduce them together and I don't try to do all 4 on a chart unless I'm fairly confident they are ready and can actually do it.
     
  7. Lanie

    Lanie Cohort

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    Dec 17, 2011

  8. Chicago Heather

    Chicago Heather Rookie

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    Dec 22, 2011

    Yes, the right hand/left hand technique always worked for me. Have your kids make a circle with the thumb and index finger on each hand, then put the remaining three fingers straight into the air. Then write the letters a (space) c (space) e pretty large on a piece of paper and have your kids hold their hands in the blank spots between the letters a and c and between c and e to fill in the missing b and d. The left hand makes a b and the right hand makes a d. I hope you can visual what I'm saying! :)
     

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