awesome website about behavior!!

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by Linguist92021, Aug 5, 2012.

  1. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Aug 5, 2012

    I came across an awesome website dealing with behavior.
    It lists 124 types of behavior (with labels, such as the Manipulator, Rebel, Shy, Talks-Back, Victim, Vindictive, etc).
    It lists the behavior (signs and description), affects (the effects it has on the classroom), action (what can be done to help the situation) mistakes (what not to do)

    I think it's awesome, I could read this for weeks.
    It seems that the philosophy of this approach is that every behavior problem stems from an unfulfilled need; once we identify the need, fulfill that, the problem will disappear. I agree with that.

    It also lists primary and secondary human needs.
    And it's also great for parents, because everything is explained twice: once from a teacher point of view and once from a parent.

    Getting to the page is a little complicated though.
    You can go there directly from this link: http://www.disciplinehelp.com/ on the left, click on 'at school' or 'at home'. The main website is masterteacher.com, but I wasn't able to find this page from there, so its a little weird.

    When you look at the list of behaviors, it shows that you can only click on a few - there is a way around it, just type the behavior in the search button, and it will come up.
    But it's easier if you register, it's free, and everything will show up.

    I'm so excited about this, this would have saved me a lot of headaches during this past year and a half!
     
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  3. Jen84

    Jen84 Companion

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    Aug 5, 2012

    Thank you for sharing this website. :) It looks like a great resource.
     
  4. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Thanks for the link, looks very interesting.
     
  5. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I'm on a mission to find out what category this one student would fit into. I've had him in my classes for about 9 months, and still couldn't quite figure out everything and how to help him:
    - he is special ed, does need specific instruction, reinforcement of the instruction, and he'll always do exactly what is said, so I have to be very clear and precise. But he usually tries hard and does all his work
    - he has to like the teacher to do his work, it's almost like all or nothing, if he likes you, he'll be great, if not, big trouble maker
    - he seems to constantly seek out attention and encouragement, almost to the point of babying him (he's 17)
    - very emotional
    - constantly seeks approval, and his way of monitoring that is smiling, waiting for a smile back, reaching his hand out for a fist bump - if i comply, he's happy, because that means hes 'so far so good'. Constantly showing his work to see if he's doing good (when he does it, he usually does all his work)
    - positive reinforcement, reward works great for him and he'll do everything to get it

    - the problem is that when I don't have time to all the above, because I have another 16 gang-members ready to throw signs and start a fight to pay attention to he gets discouraged, and gets an attitude. Now it's not all, it's nothing.
    - he becomes disruptive, and shows me he's hurt
    - 2 weeks ago, because I didn't say 'yes you're doing good', and didn't look at his paper when he shows me, I had to walk by him, hold up my hand and say 'hang on' (I had to deal with another student) he lost all his motivation, and from then on he kept talking
    - he's very sneaky. He'll talk to the TA, to make it seem like she's helping him, but he's just using her to be disruptive
    - he's constantly trying to manipulate me, all this sweet talk, and attention getting is just a way for him to butter me up, so when he's doing something bad, I'd be guilted into letting him slide
    - the few times something was missing from my classroom, he stole it
    - he did admit later, by that time I told the students I don't care, there won't be any consequences. (unfortunately a confession doesn't count at this place, i have to catch him in the act. He can always recant)
    - and what bugs me the most: he always goes too far with everything, doesn't know when to stop. When he's nice, he goes to the point of clingy, annoying and wanting my 100 % attention, and then when he can't get it, he get's an attitude. When he's being funny or joking, it goes too far into inappropriate or plain mean.
    - he's good at playing the innocent

    So what do I do? How do I stop him from crossing the line? (that seems to be the main issue). Which of his needs are not being met?
    Last week I was subbing a whole week in same classroom and he was there. I explained the individual reward they can earn, (something I always did, so he know what to do and that it will happen), he was like an angel. He did all his work, and was able to focus 100 %, and not just not be disruptive, but also not being affected by others students when they were talking.
     
  6. Ted

    Ted Habitué

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    Aug 5, 2012

    Thanks so much for this link... what a great resource! :)

    It seems it's connected/based on a book "You Can Handle Them All"... might be worth checking out. :)
     
  7. time out

    time out Comrade

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    Aug 5, 2012

    Ooh...I remember this site! It really does seem to have all the behaviors covered.
     
  8. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    This is great, thank you so much for sharing!
     
  9. Dynamite Boys

    Dynamite Boys Companion

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    This is fabulous!!! Thanks for the great link!
     
  10. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    You're welcome!! I'm so excited that I found it, it's so much information. And it all makes sense.
    And it seems like it is related to the book, 'You can handle them all", it's listed on the website. But on the webpage you can actually see all the behaviors, I don't know how much more the book adds. (As long as you do the free registration).
     
  11. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Aug 10, 2012

    I found another awesome website! I was researching 'abandonment issues'/ 'attachment disorder,' because lately that has been mentioned about our students.
    The students I deal with are either way too clingy and needy and get attached a quick and not healthy way, or the opposite, can't seem to create any kind of bond or relationship.

    This website explains it so well, it makes so much sense (up to this point I really didn't know anything about this issue)
    http://www.internet-of-the-mind.com/abandonment.html
    This website seem to have a lot of other information as well.

    The other topics I'm really interesting in and researching are:
    - manipulation
    - passive - aggressiveness
    - addiction - it's hard for me to believe that my teenage students would have actual addiction problems, but one teacher stressed the point that a lot of behavior issues, such as manipulation are trademarks of an addict.
    - any type of childhood issues that surface in the teenage years and affect student performance and student/teacher relationship.

    I just want to better understand my students, and help them more
     
  12. mikemack42

    mikemack42 Companion

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    Aug 10, 2012

    That looks great, thanks!
     
  13. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Aug 10, 2012

    So, first a comment on the first mentioned website. I'm not a huge fan of systems that draw a 100% correlation between a behavior, a function (purpose), and a response. For example, acting "arrogant" as the website mentioned may have nothing to do with behavior, yet because it's listed under "attention" you might be led to that anytime you see arrogant behavior, attention must be the function, and that all interventions that address attention-seeking behavior would be successful. If, for example, arrogance was stemming from a desire for power in peer groups, ignoring the behavior (an often-recommended intervention for attention) would not work at all.

    In terms of your specific case, often kids are pretty complex and it requires a bit of assessment and analysis to really get down to good strategies that might help, and even then you're usually starting with one or two behaviors and one or two interventions, part of a larger process which would dynamically unfold over the course of months. Part of recommending strategies would involve seeing how he responded to earlier strategies, various combinations of strategies, etc., and adjusting/titrating over time. Not trying to avoid your question of how to help, just trying to set the stage that there won't be a magic bullet answer, and probably not a complete answer on the forum.

    In terms of where to start, first I'd say it sounds like you had some good success with the reward system, and success is always a good place to start from in an intervention plan. If it's working, keep it going. Based on your description of the behavior, it sounds like the reinforcement plan isn't necessarily going to fix any issues, but it certainly may be quite helpful in managing them. A reinforcement system that is well designed, after all, does exactly what you are looking for - specifically defines the expectations (i.e., the "line" as you mentioned), and what happens when you cross it, or if you don't.

    So, the next question would be, is the problem solved? Your description of the problem seemed to end with success, so I'd be curious if there's anything else we could help brainstorm?
     
  14. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    thank you for your insight! I agree, I know we can't always pinpoint a behavior to an issue, we're more complex than that. But for me this is a good start.

    the student I was talking about is not always in my class :( I had a LTS position for 8 months, which ended on June 30th. When I sub at that school, I see him every day, but for this 2 weeks I'm somewhere else.
    What was interesting is that I got more of an insight into him, and our previous experiences once I was out of the school for a couple of weeks and then went back.
     
  15. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Aug 11, 2012

    Gotcha - insight is good!
     
  16. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Aug 12, 2012

    Linguist, has your student been evaluated for Special Education? He sounds a lot like most of my students that have Intellectual Disabilities.
     

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