Avocado Plant

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by JamieLeigh, Jan 29, 2010.

  1. JamieLeigh

    JamieLeigh Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2010

    We use the Scott Foresman Reading Street Series and read Seeds last week. We took the advice from the book and put an avocado plant in a jar- held up by toothpicks with only the bottom in the water. My kids are so eager for the plant to start growing. However, I, being a new college graduate, have no idea about what I need to do with this. Do I change the water? Add anything to it? Has this worked for anyone else? It sounds like a stupid question, but my kids are dying for it to start growing. Thanks!
     
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  3. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    Jan 29, 2010

    The skinny part of the seed needs to point down and I usually change the water every 3-5 days and add water if it does not reach the bottom of the seed at anytime. I used to do these with my kids when they were young. If you cna keep it growing, it makes a very pretty plant.
     
  4. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Point up is the standard procedure in California's avocado country. Change the water about as you'd change it for a potted plant. The seed will split a bit as the roots and the stem emerge, and then it will begin to shrivel as the baby plant uses up the nourishment in the seed.
     
  5. JamieLeigh

    JamieLeigh Rookie

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    Jan 29, 2010

    Thanks everyone. The seed has begun to split just a little bit, so hopefully that means I'm doing it right!
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Jan 29, 2010

  7. sarzacsmom

    sarzacsmom Groupie

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    Jan 30, 2010

    I find beans are so much easier. All you need is a clear plastic cup, paper towels and water. The child wets the paper towel and squeezes the water out and puts the paper towel in the cup, repeat til the cup is full. Then drop beans into the folds etc. In about a week you will have little sprouts. in a couple of weeks you will have roots and stems and little leaves. I grow them witht he children every year. We keep them for a month and then transplant them into potting soil and thent hey take t hem home. some of the children's parents have gardens and they have actually transplanted them into the garden
     
  8. MandaNicole01

    MandaNicole01 Habitué

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    Jan 30, 2010

    We just read that story a few weeks ago! We skip the avocado plant and do lima beans in a ziploc bag. Fold a paper towel, staple in the middle, pour water on paper towel, and place the beans between towel and bag. I always give the kids 4 or 5 and then tape in window. They sprout fast!!!:) Have fun! I'm hoping to have my kids to an observation log about the beans! The grow fast and easy!!!
     
  9. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I don't have anything else to add, but I wanted to say I got a little chuckle out of this thread. My first grader's teacher called me not too long ago because he got a little mouthy after this same project. You see, we are originally from South Florida. My parents property is home to 40 mature, healthy avacado trees, and it borders an avacado grove on one side, where there are hundreds more trees (these trees have been mature for as long as I've been alive, and likely much longer than that). My darling child, after seeing what his teacher called a plant, loudly announced that this was NOT an avacado tree, and she must be mistaken. I had to explain to her that he spent the first 7 years of his life climbing the darn things, so yes, he really does know what they look like, but of course I'd have a discussion with him regarding respectful behavior.
     
  10. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    (chuckling)

    Not much for suffering fools gladly, eh?
     
  11. Silmarienne

    Silmarienne Cohort

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    Jan 31, 2010

    :) To ensure success, start several. Not all will grow and of course, the kids get so emotionally involved in the success or failure of the darn thing. Avocados are worth it, they make an attractive plant. I am lucky enough to live where I can plant them outdoors and now have a 3' tree, but when I was a kid we had one in the house for years.
     
  12. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Feb 1, 2010

    I'm glad you started this thread... we have tried to grow them at home. So if the avacado seed looks shriveled (if water is still touching) it's ok?!?! I usually just throw it away?!?
     

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