Autistic Student in Regular Classroom

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by engi626, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. engi626

    engi626 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    I will be having a student with autism in my 3rd grd. ESL classroom this year. I've been reading a lot about differentiated instruction and such, but I still get stuck in assessment, in particular how it affects report cards. Does anyone have any experience with this? How did you deal with report cards/progress reports when the options are a letter grade?

    Plz help!!
     
  2.  
  3. LMT

    LMT Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2010
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    I'm assuming since he has autism that he will have an IEP...because of that he should have modifications.

    If not, and he is doing the same work as the other students...it shouldn't affect his report card.

    However, if he does have an IEP and modifications for testing and assignments, you can state that on the report card.

    I know the students I have worked with may receive Bs and Cs and then it states that grades are based on modified curriculum.

    Hope that helps...
     
  4. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    I have always had to grade students that have autism or developmental delays the same as I do all the other students and give the same tests. Which I always thought was stupid. Since a lot of the time I would have to give a Does not Meet. It doesn't look like they have learned anything when in actuality they have come a long way. The IEP would go which would show the progress.
     
  5. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Jul 25, 2010

    Check the IEP.

    It will say how the curriculum will be modified for them, and grade them normally.

    Please keep one thing in mind, you may think it is doing them something kind, but inflating a students grades is never helpful. Some of my teachers did that and it compounded my issues with math.
     
  6. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,726
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 25, 2010

    Hi there,

    I just wanted to mention that it's not PC to use the phrase "autistic student." I only bring it up because I had it pointed out to me in a "point foot in mouth" kind of moment and wanted to give you a head's up.
     
  7. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2005
    Messages:
    10,120
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    I agree hearts. Never says Autistic student, downs student..... Always better to say I have a student that has autism, or down syndrome and so on.
     
  8. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    3,231
    Likes Received:
    66

    Jul 25, 2010

    I had three students with autism last year in my general education classroom. One had an SEP (our version of the IEP) that had individualized goal in addition to regular curriculum goals. Two did not have or need an SEP. One of those two needed OT support for fine motor, while the other one was incredibly bright. None of the three had too much difficulty with the regular curriculum. It's a wide spectrum. Check the IEP.
     
  9. Lynnnn725

    Lynnnn725 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2008
    Messages:
    1,786
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    I agree - the spectrum is soooooo wide, once you get a look at the IEP, you will have a better understanding.
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Jul 25, 2010

    My nephew has Autism, and has an IEP, but with support from his inclusion teacher, he's doing pretty well! He's made it to 5th grade so far (he's only a year behind his age-mates, but he started "school" at age 3). My nephew's main educational issues aren't behavioral. If the material is concrete, like math or science, he LOVES it and does well. Abstract concepts, however, like reading, give him fits! (not literally - he just has lots of trouble with them)
     
  11. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    Students with autism can be so very different. I would suggest checking his IEP, talking with previous teacher, talking with a resource/inclusion teacher if available and talking with his parents very early on to find out what supports would help this specific student. He may need academic modifications, visual supports, behavioural supports, an emphasis on social skill learning...etc. Its hard to say just based on the label "autism". Will he have learning assistant support?

    It has already been said but as both a teacher and a parent of students with exceptional needs, remember to always put the child before the disability and this starts with the language we use. So the student is a student with autism, not an autistic student. Even in planning this approach makes things run more smoothly.

    Good luck. If you have questions that all the support people above cannot help with, come on over the special education board as there are some amazing people over there who teach classrooms specificallly for people with autism and have a wealth of information. The things that you will learn from having a child with autism in your class will have a far-reaching impact on the way you teach. Its a wonderful learning experience.
     
  12. engi626

    engi626 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2010
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    Thanks! Thanks for the heads up too, I thought of it while I was writing the question, but I didn't change it in the title. I do look forward to working with him. He's a very sweet kid. I haven't seen his IEP yet, but I've talked to his previous teacher and she did give me lots of useful info and work that he's done. He also gets a fulltime aide. The report card changes from 2nd to 3rd grade though, so that's why I was wondering about grading. He had a lot of needs improvement last year, and I was wondering how that would carry over, especially since like JamieMarie says, I have to give him the same material and tests. :(
     
  13. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 25, 2010

    engi626 - Glad you have been able to talk to his previous teacher and that he will have the support of a learning assistant. Good luck :).
     
  14. Teacher_Lyn

    Teacher_Lyn Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jul 26, 2010

    I don't want to get off topic here, especially with everyone giving such great advice, but I have to ask, WHY is it not appropiate to say "an autistic child"?

    During an interview with a new P, I referred to a student as a "girl with autism in my class" and my P said she was impressed and liked how I phrased it like that, rather than "an autistic girl".

    But why? I didn't want to ask her and sound ignorant.
     
  15. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 26, 2010

    Teacher Lyn, thank you for asking :).

    When you say an "autistic child" people tend to focus first on the autism as it comes first in what you are saying.

    When you say a "child with autism" you are focusing on the fact that they are a child first and the autism is just a part of them rather than what defines them.

    Its subtle but important because words affect the way we think :).
     
  16. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Jul 26, 2010

    It is essentially saying that the disability is what defines them.

    It's like how teachers would call me "That disabled kid"

    Or "The student who cannot write"

    Saying the student with autism means that they have autism, but it isn't something that comprises all of them. It's just something they have.
     
  17. Teacher_Lyn

    Teacher_Lyn Companion

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2008
    Messages:
    231
    Likes Received:
    2

    Jul 28, 2010

    oh okay! that makes sense. i wou.d hate to be "that kid who doesn't do math well"
     
  18. mom2mikey

    mom2mikey Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2009
    Messages:
    550
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 28, 2010

    Or worse yet ... "the math challenged kid" ;).
     
  19. bros

    bros Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2009
    Messages:
    4,105
    Likes Received:
    68

    Jul 28, 2010

    I was also known as that :p

    Math was the bane of my existence in high school. :p
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. IIAD,
  2. SaraFirst,
  3. Substitutemw
Total: 328 (members: 4, guests: 298, robots: 26)
test