attending school half day and homeschooling half day?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by teachersk, Sep 4, 2007.

  1. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 4, 2007

    I have a parent of a student who is unhappy with the nclb laws and what nclb means for her childs education. In a parent cinference today, she told me that she'd like to homeschool her child in the afternoon. She already homeschools two other children so I know she is registered with the state. I was just wondering if legally this is a possible option. Can you really pick and choose what you want? I think it complicates things more to throw in an IEP... Will we have fewer goals because the child is in school fewer hours ? Or will we still have the same iep and mom will follow it? I don't even really know what to google to get more info on this topic. She has also said that if the homeschool half day does not work she will shoot for an iep that denotes he has a modified day due to his disability (he does go to a lot of therapy during school- but a lot of my students have therapy AFTER school...) Any one have any insight? Just looking for answers so I can be sure to provide this mother what she is entitled to and do what's best for her son... ( I think school is best but thats another story!)
     
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  3. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Sep 6, 2007

    I just began my first year of teaching last week. One of the students on my case list takes cyber courses, and is only in school for a few electives and a couple classes of a study skills course (which I teach). He is only in school for half a day, every day. Every other day, he is only working on his cyber work in school during a study-hall-like arrangement (he sits in another of my study skills classes, but does not follow my curriculum).

    The school is pushing for this student to fully attended the actual school and classes with his peers, but the parents, so far, have refused (expect that he is in school for a couple electives, which is more than the past two years of strict cyber-schooling).

    So . . . the parents do have a say. I know this isn't a completely comparable case, but it's reminiscent of yours, at least.

    This student does have an IEP, but it's basically incomplete. Its goals include reading fluency, reading comprehension, and basic computation skills, but they are "to be determined in September by his case manager." Guess that'd be me! Except, I don't see him for any academic work (none of us do!). It's an interesting situation, and I am taking it one day at a time as I decipher it . . .
     
  4. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 6, 2007

    Well, I did get an e-mail back from our director of Student Services today. According to Texas state law, public schools do NOT have to provide "half day" of school to a parent who is homeschooling an elementary school child. They are entitled to join their peers on field trips, use our library, etc. They also can take "electives" and join the band and things like that when they get to middle and high school age.

    But, it is comforting to know that parents can't just "have a buffet" and pick and choose what they want from the public school.


    That's real weird about the cyber school. Even weirder to have a kid in your room using a computer but not following your curriculum. Even double whacko weirder that you have goals for him for subjects that you do not teach! That's crazy!
     
  5. frodolass

    frodolass Comrade

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    Sep 20, 2007

    I'm in Florida and our school district agreed to this type of arrangement with my son and it worked very well. He attended PS for Language Arts/Math/Science and we homeschooled in the afternoon. It is true that the district didn't HAVE to work with us this way, but they did b/c it was the best placement for my son at the time.
     
  6. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 21, 2007

    Our district did not agree to it. The mother was not happy.
     
  7. frodolass

    frodolass Comrade

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    Sep 21, 2007

    I don't know if this is just a Florida thing or if it's federal, but the school was able to get a percentage of the FTE funds for my son even though he was only there half the day. Perhaps that's why they were so agreeable?
     
  8. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 21, 2007

    She pulled the child out. They filled out the paperwork today.

    I understand if you are upset with your child's schooling. But, what I don't understand is, not allowing your child to have proper closure to that chapter of their lives.

    She wouldn't bring the child in to school - she just suddenly came in and filled out all of the paperwork. Child did not get to say goodbye to friends, classmates, teachers, the school, etc.

    THAT is sad to me. Not being able to "overcome your anger" and allow your kid to have some closure.
     
  9. kaymurr

    kaymurr Rookie

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    Sep 23, 2007

     
  10. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 23, 2007

    As far as I know, they are entitled to the related services that were being provided to the child in school. Services that the child was entitled to, such as, OT, PT, Speech, Counseling.

    When a parent chooses to take the child out of school, they are essentially rejecting the child's IEP. The IEP is one that was written for that child, in that placement. It is something that the committee decides is the best placement and instructional arrangement for that child. If the parents take them out, everything would change, the goals would need to be different because they would no longer be "immersed" in my classroom environment, with the goals that are stretched throughout the curriculum. No child could just come in for a half hour a day, or even just a half a day, and get the same out of it as one of the children who is there all day. Total structure, total routine.

    I know there are some schools that accommodate children who are homeschooled and provide something like this. However, our district was not interested in doing that. And, it's not required that they do so.

    I have a feeling the child will be back. In my room, the child was in a 2:1 adult to student ratio. (4 kids, 1 teacher, 1 aide). There was complete consistency, total structure. It's a calm environment with professionals who are trained in what they do. Now, being homeschooled, there will be five children, all different levels, in the home with just mom.

    I do understand that every parent has that right, but in this case, I personally do not think it was the best choice for the child. I am going to allow my kids to write a goodbye letter to the student, which we will send. This will at least be some closure for my students, if mom's not going to allow closure for her own child.
     
  11. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

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    Sep 23, 2007

    Actually, check out this letter from TEA that I just found on a Homeschool website.

    It (from what I can tell?) says that public schools aren't required to provide ANY services to homeschoolers, because they are seen as "private schools" and the law just changed to not require public schools to provide services to private school kids.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, though!

    http://www.thsc.org/Getting_Started/DETEA.rtf

    I personally agree with TEA's last statement in the letter:

    I know that this change may cause some hardship for individual private school students and their families. Those students will receive only those services that can be supported with federal funds and the federal government has never seen fit to fund a majority of the cost of its mandate. However, I do not have a basis for requiring the public schools to lessen funding for students with disabilities in their programs for the support of private school students.
     

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