Attendance/Lunch Count

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by teacherbell, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. teacherbell

    teacherbell Cohort

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    Jul 25, 2005

    What is the easiest way you have found for doing attendance and lunch count? I would like to do something where the students "check in" in the morning and I can see at a glance who is there and what they are eating for lunch that day. What have you made or bought that has made this process quick and easy for you? Thank you for your help!! :)
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    My kids take their chairs down so I know who's in. I've seen pocket charts with kids' photos, kids turn card with photo face first to show who's in. I've done lunch count with cups and kids' names on popsicle sticks- they put stick in labelled cup to show whether buying or brought lunch. Any sticks not in a cup are absent- this process gives you lunch count and attendance in one procedure. :D
     
  4. NCP

    NCP Comrade

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    I made a chart with library stick on pockets on a poster board. I do five pockets across and 4-5 rows down. I laminate the board and cut the pocket open with an exact-o knife. It holds up all year. On each pocket I place a label with the kids names. Then they place a popcicle stick in to show which lunch they are having. The popcicle sticks have a red dot on one end and a blue one on the other. At our school we also have lunch cards for the kids with their numbers, so I put a small velcro dot on each pocket and on the back of the card, so at lunch time they just go over and get their card. At the end of the day I have the lunch count helpers take the sticks out and put them in the jar and put up the cards. It works great and the kids do a great job getting the job done in the morning.
     
  5. Andrea L

    Andrea L Habitué

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    NCP..I love your idea of putting kids pictures on cards! I think I may have to do that this year!
     
  6. MzB

    MzB Rookie

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    Jul 25, 2005

    What I've seen done is the kids each have a stick person (they had a ditto picture, could also use a photo) and they had to find theirs and place it on the chart under boys or girls. Then they'd count who was here, and they had to guess who wasn't (this was kindergarten).

    Another way I've seen is to have the kids sign in on a dry erase board. For younger kids, this is good to help them practice writing their names.

    To make it more involved, you can have a weekly attendence/lunch helper, and they have to announce to the class how many boys are there, how many girls, the total there, who's missing, and how many are buying lunch/milk. This is a good way to help kids get used to talking in front of the class and using oral presentation skills.
     
  7. hojalata

    hojalata Comrade

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    Jul 25, 2005

    Here's an idea that incorporates graphing too! You could make a small, rectangular magnet with each child's name on it. On a big piece of paper, make a bar graph that has (for example) Brought Lunch, Lunch Choice 1, and Lunch Choice 2 on it. Construct the graph but leave empty rectangles. Clip the graph onto the chalkboard. (Make sure the magnets you used for their names are strong enough to go through the paper). All the students' magnets stay off the graph. When the come into the room in the morning, they check in by placing their magnet on the correct place on the graph. Any names left should be the one's who aren't there that day. (Unless they forgot!) If your grade does graphing in math, you can incorporate it into your math lessons, like, Which lunch choice is the more popular? etc. I explained that the best that I could, I hope it made some sense!
    Heather
     
  8. srh

    srh Devotee

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    Jul 25, 2005

    In my student teaching K class, we had a pocket chart with each student's name on a card (first and last, but you can start out with just first name). When they came into the classroom, they removed the card (or it could be flipped over) and put it into a container. A quick glance at the chart told us who was not present. I will be using the same method in my classroom--it is just too easy!! In the second half of the year, you could make name cards using both first and last names or just last name, for the added learning process!

    We did not have a lunch program for these kids, so I have nothing to add there!
     
  9. MissJ

    MissJ Rookie

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    In a class I had a clinical with (2nd grade), the teacher used a system similar to the those some people have already mentioned. They have a pocket chart/poster with library pockets on the door. Each pocket is labelled with the students' name and has an index card in it (also with student's name) When the students come in in the mornings, they get their card and put it in another pocket thing just inside the classroom 1/2/Brought... the teacher allowed a student to count them each morning, and that's how she took lunch count and attendance. She could just look at the chart to see whose cards were still there to see who hadn't come in. I really like that one.

    Another thing I had a teacher do, was have a foam.plastic plate divided into 3 sections (choice 1, choice 2, brought lunch). Each student had a clothes pin with his/or her name on it. When they came in, they each got their clothes pin and put it on the plate in the correct section. It made it easy to count the choices that way and to see whose clothes pins were left.
     
  10. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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  11. Beth2004

    Beth2004 Maven

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    In a classroom that I did one of my practicums in, the teacher had a small white board hung up near the door. Each child had their name on a small magnet and when they walked in the door they would place it under "school lunch" or "brought lunch" Any names left on the side of the board that were not under a category were students that were absent and the ones that were in had their names organized underneath the lunch columns. I thought it was cute!
     
  12. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    This worked so well for me. I have a two column pocket chart by the door. On one side is all the students name. On the other side are construction paper slips. Red stands for regular tray, blue for brought lunch, and green for salad bar. Our students have lunch cards to scan through the computer in the lunch room. These are placed in front of the construction paper each day. When a child walks into the classroom, they put the color of construction paper that correlates with what they are doing for lunch. I will give a five minute warning when I take roll. If their lunch card is in front, then they are not here. I never call roll. I will call out the students who "are not here", just to give them a chance to choose their lunch. It's really not as difficult as it looks.
     
  13. hayleysmom

    hayleysmom New Member

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    In my 4th grade room, I have two jobs on my job board for students to take care of (along with others)- messenger and lunch count. The messenger will take attendance to the office and lunch count will count up who is buying what and deliver to the cafeteria. When the morning bell rings, students must be seated. It is easy to see who is not there. I call rows or tables depending on the seating arrangement and they go to the lunch count corner. It is decorated like a picnic area. I hang up cute decorated paper plates with the different options written on them. In a picnic basket I place clothes pins with the students names on them. They simply attach the clothes pin to the plate they choose. Lunch count helper counts them up and removes them. I also make sure to hang our lunch menu up nearby so I don't have to hear "What's for lunch?" a million times. :) And you can get really creative with decorating, like cute ants crawling around, etc.
     
  14. bam451

    bam451 Rookie

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    Hi! I teach 2nd grade. For the last three years I have done the pocket chart approach for students to check in and also show what they would like to eat for lunch. I saw a teacher last year who had a venn diagram on the board. Each child had their name on a magnet and when they checked in they answered a question on the venn diagram. The teacher could then check to see who's magnet was left. I know this doesnt cover lunch, but I thought it was a great practice for math.
     
  15. teacherbell

    teacherbell Cohort

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    Thank you all so much for your ideas! I can see that I have a lot of options to choose from. We have a lot creative teachers here!
     
  16. Candace

    Candace New Member

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    In our K and 1st grade classrooms, the students carry daily folders to and from school. These folders are our link to parents. They have been informed to check them everyday. In the morning the students are called up to my desk by tables. I get to greet each one and quickly glance through their folders for any important notes, bus changes, lunch money, etc. This also lets me know which parent did not get the information I may have sent. Last year I had 20 students and this practice took at most 8-10 minutes. I have a map of their tables and once all of the folders are collected, I can quickly glance at them to determine who is not present. We have 4 choices for lunch everyday...1 and 2 are hot lunch choices, 3 is a sandwich choice and 4 is a packer...I assign each choice a place in the room and after attendance, the I tell 1st choice to go to that spot, 2nd choice to their spot, etc. When everyone is up, each choice gets to "count off". We then talk about which group has more/less. Its quick and easy and the students love it. Sometimes I will ask first group to walk to their spot like a bunny and 2nd group like a turtle...it is a great way to get them moving and smiling first thing in the morning.
     
  17. LandAmom

    LandAmom New Member

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    I use a three foot space on the end of my chalkboard (which is magnetic). I have three columns, Hot, Cold, Sack. I then make little magnetic cards for the students with whatever theme I am using that year (last year I used a flag print). But be sure to laminate them to last throughout the year! I write a student's name on each card and put them in a small basket by the board. Each day that the students come in they put there card on the board under the lunch choice for the day. This allows me to count how many for lunch and check the basket to see who is absent. Works like a charm!!!!
     
  18. iteachm123

    iteachm123 Comrade

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    This is what I'm going to do for my first year teaching third grade: I will make a very large dollar bill, construction paper size and laminated, a large lunchbox made out of construction paper, and a large capital A. Everyone will have a clothespin with their names on it and when they come in the door they have to move their clothespin from "A"-absent to either the dollar bill (buying) or the lunchbox (packing). At the end of the day, the helper of the week will move all the clothespins back to the A and we start all over again the next morning.
     
  19. mmis

    mmis Companion

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    Aug 1, 2005

    lunch count

    I wanted something simple and quick and easy to make. I just have 3 pieces of ribbon hot-glued to my wall just inside the door with the #s 1(choice one),2(choice two),and 3(lunchbox) above them.
    As he enters the room in the a.m each child takes his clothespin and puts it on his choice for the day.
    I have 2 students who are responsible for e-mailing our lunch choices to the lunchroom. I don't fool with it at all.

    I can also see at a glance who is absent.
     
  20. jengrabinski

    jengrabinski Rookie

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    I had an attendance chart last year & will NEVER do it again . . . it's very impersonal. At least if you have to ask them if they are buying or ordering, you are talking to them. I felt like I didn't talk to my shy kids until at least an hour or more into the school day.
     
  21. yomo

    yomo Rookie

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    My first graders enter the room and go right to their table spots. There are baskets of books at each table related to our current theme or holiday and the students start reading those books as soon as they sit down. I then walk from table to table taking attendance and lunch count. This gives me a chance to greet each child personally and gives them a chance to share something they might want to tell me. After I greet the child, he/she takes his/her things to the closet and hangs up coat, etc. and returns to continue reading. Once we get the routines established, it takes about 10 minutes to do this and I find that it is a very personal way to start the day.
     
  22. srh

    srh Devotee

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    I really like that, Yomo!! There is something for everyone to do right away, and it seems like a great, comfortable routine for the kids. It would probably work in Kindergarten too. Are there ever any problems with them having all their "stuff" at the table for a while? Or is there a specific reason you don't have them drop it off before they sit down?
     
  23. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    My kids need to unpack when we come into the room. I check for attendance first by checking the cubbies and then by doubling checking the chairs and the lunch sign.

    My lunch sign is comprised of 5 pieces of paper (Not Here, Brought Lunch, Hot Lunch, PB&J, Alternative Sandwich) laminated together in a straight vertical line. I post the menu above it. Each child has a clothespin with his/her name on it and he/she places the clothespin on the right paper. If he/she brought lunch, the clip goes on the outside of "Broguth Lunch". It allows me to see who isn't in school or who is not paying attention to the morning routine. I always review the menu with them before I send lunch count down, but the kids are pretty good about it. I taught 2nd grade last year and this year I have 3rd.

    All of the 2nd grade teachers did it that way:)
     
  24. yomo

    yomo Rookie

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    SRH, I live in South Dakota, so we have A LOT of "stuff", especially in the winter! I don't have any problems with their things at the table. Actually, backpacks and coats go on the floor behind their chairs, not on the tables because they are reading. I guess I started to do it this way because I have a small closet area and didn't want everyone to be in there at the same time. I find that it works well for us, the kids take out their take-home folders and reading bags while at their table spots and can put them away before taking their backpacks to the closet. I've done it this way for the past 4 years and have found it the most time-effective way to take care of morning business.
     
  25. danda

    danda Rookie

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    I prefer to ask students as I think it is more personal (and gives them verbal accountability as well). The tip I wanted to share is how to track it in your grade book. I found it hard to track "tardy" students (the teachers are responsible for attendance records at my school) because I had already completed attendance in my gradebook. Rather than use "A" for absent, or "T" for tardy and having to use whiteout, I use this method: If a student is not present when I take morning attendance, I simply use a diagonal (/) line in the square of my gradebook for that day. If they come late, instead of changing the diagonal line, I simply add a smaller diagonal line perpendicular to the original diagonal line (going from the original diagonal line to the lower right corner of the box). It ends up looking like a small "T". I circle the (/) or the "T" for excused absences and tardies and leave them (not circled) for unexcused absences and tardies. SORRY - long and wordy description - I'm very tired today!
     
  26. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    I had one of my cooperating teachers use a posterboard with 25 library cards on it. Each one had the child's name on it. Before the children got there, she would put their lunch card in their slot. When each child got there they would put in the picture of what they were doing for lunch (red tray, or blue lunchbox). It worked just as well as anything else. I prefer the 2 column pocket chart. We have 5 minutes to get the lunch count down to the office after the tardy bell rings. It's simpler to ask the students to just show you right off that way you can talk to them about other things (like homework, notes, the birthday party they went to last night, how they lost their tooth, etc...)
     
  27. Tch4th

    Tch4th Rookie

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    I typed necessary info on a small sheet of paper (eating school lunch, eating lunch from home, drinking chocolate milk, drinking white milk) and glued those to index cards. Every morning, my kids come in, fill out their lunch cards using a Vis-a vis marker, deliver notes and/or monies to a basket on my desk, and then go to breakfast or begin their morning work. This frees up my morning to personally greet the kids or talk to parents or deal with whatever calamities occur during this time! Then, after I send the pertinent info up to the office, my helper for the day cleans off the cards and puts them back in the box (which happens to be a small wet-wipe box). The other great part of this is that it cost nothing but time!
     
  28. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Along those lines: How about printing of a class list in an exel spreadsheet? You could create columns of lunch choices (regular tray, salad bar, brought lunch). Laminate it and put it on the wall or a table the kids go by. When kids come in they could check off with a vis-a-vis what they're doing for lunch. It's reusable and cheap.
     
  29. SimplySue

    SimplySue Rookie

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    Lots of good ideas here. I put the responsibility on the students. We have so many choices at our school. The "lunchcounter" calls out each choice and writes the number of students. If a problem occurs with the count, I like the list and the vis-a-vis check. Perhaps their initials instead of a check. One of the students could design the list - OR - students create a new list each month with a seasonal decoration. Hmmmm! Wheels are turning.

    Sue
     

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