At what point in a long term sub do you become elegible for health benefits?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Cinderfella, Mar 22, 2015.

  1. Cinderfella

    Cinderfella Rookie

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    Mar 22, 2015

    I am a substitute teacher/substitute clerical person. I did a 2 month long term sub teacher position last fall and then I was asked to do a long term sub for our Learning Commons Coordinator (Librarian) starting the beginning of January. Unfortunately, the lady that I am subbing for is now not going to be able to come back until maybe January 2016 because of a medical issue.

    When I sub as a teacher I am paid from a third party but as clerical I am employed by school district. Everything so far has been on a two week time frame and they are putting me in Aesop two weeks at a time. My husband thinks that after 90 days I will be considered full time employee.

    Does anyone have any experience with this situation?

    Interesting fact.....I make much more money per hour as a clerical sub than I make as a substitute
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Mar 22, 2015

    I think it depends on the district. Long terms subs in most districts near make more money after a certain amount of days, but they don't get benefits.
     
  4. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Mar 22, 2015

    This is going to vary tremendously by district. I did an entire semester, and that was still considered subbing with no benefits. However, I was hired for the following year, at which point I was eligible for benefits. My go to answer in this case is to simply call HR and seek clarification. They are the most qualified to give you the answers you seek.
     
  5. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Mar 22, 2015

    Call the HR department, but I'd be surprised if you were eligible for benefits. Hopefully, you're in a one in a million district that values all employees.
     
  6. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Mar 23, 2015

    I subbed for a district once that had to offer benefits after 45 days. So naturally, they would schedule you for 44 days, then ask you to not come in on the 45th so your count could start over.
     
  7. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Mar 23, 2015

    There is usually a difference between leave replacement and long term subbing, although the terms are often used interchangeably. In a leave replacement, you usually make the contracted salary, but will not receive any benefits. If you are subbing, that pay is per day and it is usually lower than replacement. The bottom line is that the terms may not be clearly defined, so you should always call HR. You won't, to the best of my knowledge, receive benefits unless you have a signed contract that states you will receive benefits.
     
  8. Cinderfella

    Cinderfella Rookie

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    Mar 30, 2015

    this started out as a long term sub for 4-6 weeks and is now going to last to at least next January.

    Lady I am subbing for has only been on job since Aug 1 and left for surgery on Jan 5. She has now gone to BOE and they have granted her a medical leave of absence with no pay for 2 years. Things will get messy later. Her job requires her to work past end of school year by a week and begin 3 weeks before school starts. Our School district only allows subs in buildings if there are students. The person who I report to wants me to stay to fill position but I haven't heard from those in "real" power.
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Mar 30, 2015

    Most states have a set time period that you can hire a sub that isn't credentialed in the content area, usually a month or so. At that point, if the sub is credentialed in the content area, and all parties are in agreement, the sub can stay longer, usually with a bump in pay, but no benefits. Since this teacher is going to be on extended medical leave, I believe it is highly likely that they will post her job, either as a one year contract not considered tenure track, or some other phrase that Ohio uses and I am not familiar with. The good news is that the replacement is hired, traditionally, at the contracted annual rate, so more money, but also without benefits - it is leave replacement. I highly suggest that you contact HR for clarification. If they have to officially open a job search, you will most likely have to apply like any other candidate. That doesn't mean that you might not have a front runner kind of status, but it would necessitate a formal application, including LOR, proof of credentials, etc. The situation you have described leads to the belief that there will have to be an official hire and contract, since the hours/days are unique to this position. I know someone who was a long term sub, and was then asked to become a leave replacement. No benefits, but huge jump in pay. There is no assurance that the job will be there in the fall, but the school is submitting the time worked for both assignments to apply towards the provisional year requirement, so a good thing.
     

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