at what point do you say they are not ready?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by maggie123, Oct 12, 2010.

  1. maggie123

    maggie123 Rookie

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    Oct 12, 2010

    I am a pre-kindergarten teacher in a private elementary school. I have a child that is 4 1/2 (so he is chronologically ready for pre-k) He is struggling with behavior. He seems immature compared to the other children. The mom is working with me to correct the behavior (which she says never happens at home, he is well behaved) I have tried many different approaches with him. He is also behind the rest of the group in many of his skills, but not all.

    At what point do you tell a parent their child might not be ready for pre-k, that they might want to give it another year? :( How much time do you give it before you cross that bridge? I have never had to address the issue before, and I'm not even sure how to say it in a way so they won't be offended... :unsure:
     
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  3. SamIAm

    SamIAm Companion

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    Oct 12, 2010

    I'm not sure that I would tell a parent that their child isn't ready for pre-k. It's not something that I would assess readiness for beyond the basics: age, mental and physical health etc. The whole point of pre-k is prepare them for kindergarten. If at the end of the year, the child does not have the skills necessary to move on, that's different. A lot of schools do a kindergarten readiness assessment which makes it easier for the teacher to talk to the parent since the test is objective.

    If you have concerns about the child developmentally, you may want to speak to your principle and determine what steps you should take toward referring the child to early intervention.

    Now, if you feel that the child is a safety risk to the other children, you have a right to expel him from your class, but to say he isn't ready for pre-k doesn't really make much sense to me.
     
  4. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Oct 13, 2010

    I know what you mean about feeling like the child is not ready, but you have to have documentation and facts, not just a hunch or a feeling.

    The first thing I would do is talk to another teacher or your principal and ask someone to come in and observe this child so you have a second opinion. Then, if they agree with you, I would talk to the principal or administrator and ask him/her how he/she would approach it with the parents.
     
  5. maggie123

    maggie123 Rookie

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    Oct 13, 2010

    Well, I think my main issue I can't get through a story or a lesson without stopping 12 times to say please sit on your bottom or stop talking to so and so. Even during movement he is rolling around or falling on the rug- never really doing what everyone else is doing. I know several people who feel their boys needed an extra year and are holding them out. We have been working on our names everyday, yet when he is asked to write it without assistance, I don't recognize anything that looks like a letter, yet he cuts very well. He very much does silly things to get the attention of the other boys, name calling, etc.
    Since it is a private school, it's not free to the parents, I think if it looked like my child might end up in pre-k two years I would want to know, because maybe I can't afford to pay for it twice. Although I am well aware that a child can change a lot in a year.
     
  6. Pisces_Fish

    Pisces_Fish Fanatic

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    Oct 13, 2010

    I think it's much too early to say. I would wait until the end of the year, but keep documenting.
     
  7. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Oct 13, 2010

    Even some of my kindergartners can't write their name independently yet. I understand what you're saying, but I don't think that is an indicator of not being ready for K.

    Keep documenting and meet him where he is. What does he need that you don't have available to him right now? Expecting him to rise to the curriculum never works. Find out what he needs and provide it for him and see how he develops.
     
  8. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    Oct 13, 2010

    If he's not ready for pre-k, then what is he ready for? He's got to learn how to follow rules, sit on his bottom, etc. somewhere. Why wouldn't it be in a pre-k class? I know it makes teaching harder on you, but he has to learn this somewhere.

    Sorry, to come off rude sounding or having lack of sympathy. I TOTALLY understand how frustrating it can be. I teach preschool special ed. and I have some of my spe. ed. kids that aren't ready for this either, but hey, they have to learn it sometime or another and we are the ones that are the teachers and that are getting paid to do the job.
     
  9. TeacherApr

    TeacherApr Groupie

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    Oct 13, 2010

    Definitely document and find a checklist of skills that are needed for Kindergarten. The focus should be on getting these kids mastering the skills 80% or above BUT not until the Spring. They are still learning right now. He could just be a slow learner....
     
  10. maggie123

    maggie123 Rookie

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    Oct 13, 2010

    Yes, I get that, but this isn't a special ed class, and the parents of the other 20 kids are paying thousands of dollars for their kids to spend the day learning, not watching the teacher spend most of the day disciplining one boy who is so disruptive little learning can happen, unless he is removed from the group.
    My thought was not that he doesn't belong in preschool, I was considering that since he is significantly less mature than everyone in the class, even those younger than him, that perhaps he is not ready for pre-k.
    I am not expecting him or anyone to master kindergarten skills in October. What I am saying is that after 6 weeks of doing something everyday, I should be able to see an tiny inkling of improvement from where they started, even in a slow learner, some of which I also have.
    I am not ready to talk to the parents, I don't give up that easy. My question was just to see at what point others might say this isn't working for the child. So basically no one would ever say that, and would keep them there even if they have trouble keeping up. Glad to hear your opinions.
    Didn't mean to offend so many people.
     
  11. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Oct 13, 2010

    I don't think you are offending anyone. I think people are just offering opinions. I teach K and I have a few students in my class this year who match the description of your child.

    If the behavior issue is severely disrupting the learning of the other students, then have a discussion with your director/principal about what the protocol is at your school for handling that sort of behavior.
     
  12. SamIAm

    SamIAm Companion

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    Oct 13, 2010

    I apologize if I came off harsh. What I meant to say was that it's pre-K that prepares children for later learning. There isn't really anything to prepare them for pre K - you're it. I really do understand. I have a child in my class who sounds very similar to yours. It can be so frustrating - especially when it interferes with your ability to run your classroom the way you want. My fear has always been that the one problem child might turn parents off to the point that they may remove their children from my program. Fair? No, but very possible. I would speak to your principle. At a private school, you want to be careful not to upset any parent - this includes the parents of this child, and the parents of the other children in your class. Either she needs to give you someone to assist you with that student, or have him possibly evaluated for early intervention. I would think that removing the child would be a last resort, but if keeping him in could potentially turn off the parents of the other children in your class, it may be necessary. If the principal isn't willing to help you, I'd make a little mention of how the other children (and their parents) are affected by his behavior. The bottom line is always paramount. :)
     
  13. Momma C

    Momma C Comrade

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    Oct 14, 2010

    So Little Johnny is well-behaved at home. I wonder what "well-behaved" means to the parents. Anyway, my parents went through the same thing with my brother. Momma had to set up weekly meetings with the teacher (with brother present). Once he realized that Momma would be there every Friday, he started doing better. The teacher kept a behavior log, also. You probably need to give a written (documentation!) progress report to the parents every week.
     
  14. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    Oct 14, 2010

    "I'm seeing these behaviors at school. Do they happen at home? How do you handle them at home? Consistency is important for kids this age, can we come up with a plan together?"
     
  15. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Oct 14, 2010

    Consider yourself lucky that you have only one at this behavior level.
     
  16. fiskeda

    fiskeda Rookie

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    Oct 16, 2010

    If he is only 4 1/2 maybe he should be in a 3 day program and then do p-K next year.....he is very young.....I held my own son back this year he just turned 5 he wasn't ready....
     
  17. scmom

    scmom Enthusiast

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    Oct 16, 2010

    I think it is the policy of many early childhood organizations and experts that it is not the responsibility of the child to be ready for school, it is our responsibility to be ready to meet the needs of whatever child is in our class. Sounds more simple than it is, but it is food for thought.
     
  18. SpecialPreskoo

    SpecialPreskoo Moderator

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    :thumb:Well said!
     
  19. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Oct 16, 2010

    As I said in a related thread about boy preschoolers.....I have learned more about how to teach by trying to reach the hard to teach children than I would have learned in 100 years of the perfect children.

    Just keep trying to get engaged with him, he is there, and I have faith that you will find him.
     

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