Assistant teaching position

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by atxteacher, Jul 28, 2014.

  1. atxteacher

    atxteacher Rookie

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    Jul 28, 2014

    Has anyone taken an assistant teaching position if a full time job can not be found? I would be subbing as a plan B but have the potential to take a teaching assistant position. The pay is about the same but what are the pros and cons? I don't know what to do.. :help:
     
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  3. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 28, 2014

    Possibly benefits? Around here, aides/assistants get benefits, which trumps subbing any day of the week. One downside - some people you get pigeon holed and that the school will only ever see you as an assistant. That said, paying bills trumps being broke, so do whatever feels right.
     
  4. sunfishy

    sunfishy Rookie

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    A teaching assistant position is much better than being a sub. I have NEVER seen a sub hired as a teacher in any of the districts that I have worked for. The principal and other teachers are not in the classroom when the sub is teaching so they really don't know much about you. As an aide you can network with the teachers in the school and build a relationship with the principal. That being said, it is better to be an ABA (Applied Behavioral Analysis) aide than a regular aide. It pays a little more, but it also proves that you can handle difficult students. Please be warned, an ABA position is not easy.
     
  5. MissPapa

    MissPapa Comrade

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    Jul 28, 2014

    Any full-time job is better than being a sub. But definitely express your interests in becoming a teacher someday. And possibly keep looking for jobs (you'll be in a better position than just subbing and looking for full-time).
     
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Jul 29, 2014

    An assistant teacher position isn't the end of the world, but may I suggest that you spend the time in that position accumulating graduate credits from online courses, such as PBS Teacherline, or other university programs, since one of the perks will likely include tuition reimbursement. That way, not only does the school you are at see that you are serious about becoming more proficient, but other schools that you interview at in the future will note, and rightly so, that you have stayed the course and continued your education, not content to rest on your laurels. Just a suggestion.
     
  7. atxteacher

    atxteacher Rookie

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    Jul 29, 2014

    Well i have my Masters in Elem Ed and my ESL cert...

    I just passed my test last week so that is why I am late in the game to get a full time job... sigh...
     
  8. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Question - is that the quick certification that takes little time and may be online? I know that Texas is a little different from other states when it comes to ESL certification. OK, that is more me being curious, as I have just completed my MEd. in TESL, but it is something that I have never been able to wrap my head around. So what next? May I suggest work on a Teacher of Students with Disabilities certification, if Texas has those? Here in NJ, that takes around 21 graduate credits, and it is highly desirable for teachers of all grade levels. Do you have a subject matter certificate, like math, a science, English, or a foreign subject? If not, that would be a great place to start adding credits, since that drastically changes what you are qualified to teach. Just thoughts and suggestions. I, for one, am loathe to leave tuition reimbursement on the table unused. A plus is that if the school has invested money in you, they are more apt to consider you as a full time teacher, not just an assistant, IMHO.
     
  9. atxteacher

    atxteacher Rookie

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    I received my undergrad in Development and Family studies and went to get my masters in elementary ed. The program I did was called CMEed (certification and your masters degree) It was 12 classes and you have to take an exit exam upon graduation and complete your Texes exams. It just look me some time to pass the tests. The cert is form General Education EC-6 with ESL. Too bad tuition reimbursements can not be used for loans! You can add on certifications but not sure if you can just take the test or take additional coursework for it. I already have loans until I die..

    But my college I received my Masters from, the only option is to get the ESL cert instead of just general now because so many Texas schools require it. So it was a program I went through and coursework for it.

    Texas does have alternative cert programs but I do not know much info about that!
     
  10. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Generally, you qualify for different certifications based on the amount of credit you have in certain courses as well as testing into them. Example: I have something like 70+ credits in science - thought I would be a vet. I have a all grades biology cert. I could have chem - no interest. Now I also have the amount of credit needed to teach ELA at middle school, along with Science, Elem. Ed., Social Studies, TOSD (in progress), and ESL. I have passed the Praxis in Biology, MS Science, MS ELA, and Elem. Ed., and I am considering my MS SS in the fall. My ESL had a comprehensive exam from the state and ACFTL exam as well, that can only be taken once the courses for the certification have been completed. I could take the ELA, Elem. Ed, and potentially the SS based on the courses that I took in college, without more instruction. If, however, I wanted to teach English to all grades, I would need another 12 credits in the 300-400 course level to attain that cert, and yes, I would need another Praxis exam for that too. Elem. Ed. is kind of a generalist degree, lacking in one big strength. Perhaps you have credits and sequences that would qualify you for other endorsements, and TEA is good to look at your transcript and evaluate it for what you can and can't do, as well as what may be possible with a course here or there. Yeah, I know about Texas - my son has multiple certificates there, but that didn't get him a job! Since you bring up student loans, you really should look into some of the positions that have you work in districts designated in need - usually high poverty here in NJ - that will reduce your student loans by a significant amount if you work a certain amount of time in those districts. Don't be surprised if you go "SO not where I want to teach!" These are districts where few people want to teach, so the reduction in student loans is the carrot.

    Now, if the TEA evaluates your transcript and tells you that with a course here or there, or that you actually already have enough credits in something that could be a major in something OTHER than Elem. Ed., you can be approved to take the teacher exam for that certification. If missing a course, and you complete it, the TEA will look again, and then give permission. Less stress to have the time to prep for a cert without having to actively seek a job at the same time. My son still has debt, but he did use the tuition reimbursement and a grant to pay for his master's in ESL without accumulating any new debt, which seems pretty smart and positive to me. When he was looking at ESL in Texas, TAMU provides an online course that is short and sweet for ESL and preps you for that exam for certification. Texas even pays a good portion of the reasonable tuition if you already have a standard certificate! I don't know about what that means as a separate certification there. We went with the master's program here, instead, and now the Texas certifications and licenses just sit on a shelf. Oh, well - it is always worthwhile to pass the exams and take care of the paperwork.
     
  11. tired.mom

    tired.mom Companion

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    Jul 29, 2014

    I'm in Texas--you can just take the special ed test and poof--then you can teach SpEd as well as your first endorsement (generalist). SpEd qualifies you to teach any level. With that said, I wouldn't get that endorsement unless you're serious about teaching SpEd...it's hard to get good special ed teachers in many districts, and they will keep you in that field rather than let you branch out. That was my experience, at least. :)

    But, if you're interested in working with special ed--take the test and it will help you get a job, I am sure. ETA no additional coursework needed, you just register for the test, pay for it, and take it, after you already are certified.
     
  12. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Tired Mom, that is so good to know! The son is not as keen to go there as he once was, but that might be something to lure him to reconsider. Thank you!
     
  13. tired.mom

    tired.mom Companion

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    Jul 29, 2014

    Thanks, Lynettstoy! Special ed is still considered a "shortage position" in Texas and I am halfway tempted to go on and apply for a SpEd job again--no more counselor interviews on tap at the moment. I totally admit that the endorsement got me a job in my old district, so it's something to consider.
     

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