Asked to Resign but don't know why, HELP!

Discussion in 'Secondary Education Archives' started by bizedteacher, May 1, 2005.

  1. bizedteacher

    bizedteacher New Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 1, 2005

    Two years ago I was emergency certified and hired in a subject area which was similar to my endoresement area. I was hired two months after the school year had started. The students had had two substitute teachers, thus continuity or clear expectations for these students were not set.

    When I was hired, the teaching mentor who was assigned to me was the teacher I was replacing. After being in the position for which I was hired, this same teacher had resigned a week before the school year started to take a position at the district level. She had been in this position for 7 years, and had built a repore with the students, many of them I felt resented the fact that I was their new teacher and their previous teacher had "abandoned" them.

    Also, upon being hired in this position I was basically told by my mentor to teach the cirrculum she had taught. Being in my late 30's I felt very stiffled as if I had no say. I also resented the fact that the same teacher who left these students and district in a bind was still "in charge" of what I taught. Thus I rarely asked her for help.

    Now here is where the waters get muddy. When I was hired I was a first year teacher. The principal would come in and do his mandatory evaluations. All of my evalutions were excellent. Yet two months before the end of the school year I was asked to resign so they wouldn't have to fire me and put my future teaching career and license in jeapordy. When I was asked why I was being asked to resign the only answer I was I given was because they didn't feel like I was qualified for the position, plus I didn't seek help from my mentor.

    Is my being asked to resign common? Does my situation sound common? Why would I be given glowing evalutions, plus least I forget, outstounding letters of reference from the very people who decided I needed to resign?

    Before this happened I had never been asked to resign or was never fired from any position. As a first year teacher this was devasting to me. Plus I have yet to find another teaching job.

    How do I handle my being asked to resign at my next teaching interview? I would love to hear from anyone who has been in a similar siutation.
     
  2.  
  3. D2theMcV

    D2theMcV Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2005
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2005

    Usually they'll develop a "paper trail" so if they do have to fire you, they can back it up with documentation. That's about all I know about that. If you're in a union, talk to your rep.

    As far as the interviewing goes, if you resigned you could say just about anything. I doubt your principal would rat you out. Though, I'd be non-specific, and more neutral than overly positive or negative.
     
  4. sdhudgins

    sdhudgins Comrade

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2004
    Messages:
    416
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2005

    I'd ask to see a copy of my record. There should be something written in there on you as to why youn were asked to resign,
    if there isn't I'd question it quite heavily.. but then do my best to get the heck out and move on because I'm obviously not wanted there.
     
  5. ViolaSwamp

    ViolaSwamp Habitué

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2004
    Messages:
    789
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 3, 2005

    I've been under the impression that because of NCLB (and all the WASL junk) districts in WA should not hire teachers out of their endorsement areas. I thought I'd actually heard that NCLB forbid it unless a district had extensively tried and failed to fill a position.

    Yes, you got excellent reviews, but those only focused on a few individual lessons, not your overall curriculum. They've sited qualification, to me that doesn't address whether or not you have teaching ability. I would take that as your knowledge of the subject matter. If you were given a mentor and the mentor told you what to teach, I suspect that they asked her opinion of you. I'm sure your not using the curriculum jaded her opinion. Because you were a first year teacher they really wanted to see signs of you striving for growth. Talking to your mentor may have been their measurement tool.
     
  6. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2005
    Messages:
    4,881
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 3, 2005

    I think he did use her curriculum if I'm reading correctly. You'll have to tell us yes or no. Did you have a specific number of hours that you had to spend with your mentor? We have to spend 4 hours a month with our mentors, and document it. I would definatly ask why you are not qualified for the position. Your liscensure is legitimate, and should not be a basis for your being asked to resign.
     
  7. helpinghand

    helpinghand Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 28, 2002
    Messages:
    68
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 30, 2005

    Everything Will Be Fine

    Something very similar happened to me. I t sounds to me that the emergency certification process probably left you with needed requirements unfulfilled. Although you helped the school in an emergency situation, someone can not legally keep you on the job without requirements you may not have.

    I agree with another response check your file, but more importantly and simply, check the requirements for your state licensure. After this, go to a university in your area where an adisor can advise you step by step.

    Unfortunately, school sytems are often under the gun to fill so many positions, that unexpected openings with a room full of students will cause some to satisfy that need, without considering the long term effect on the new teacher.

    Get your license the traditional way, so no one can take anything away from you! Oh and stay abreast on all there is to know in your area. If teaching is what you are called to do, then this is just a stone in the road.

    You can do it!

    God Bless You. :angel:
     
  8. Eki75

    Eki75 Rookie

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2005
    Messages:
    52
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 1, 2005

    A good friend of mine was in a very similar situation at the University level. I think the advice about talking to your union rep and asking to see your file are good steps. I also agree that whatever the reason they've treated you this way, I would hightail it out of there and find a job where you are treated as you deserve to be treated. I am sorry you are going through this, but it's just a little hurdle and I'll bet you can jump it just fine. Best of luck to you!
     
  9. Emyly

    Emyly Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2005
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 1, 2005

    At our school system we have tenure stipulations. . they do not legally have to give a reason for non-renewing a teacher's contract if they are not tenured (3 years at that district).
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 179 (members: 0, guests: 162, robots: 17)
test