Are you using anything you learned in college?

Discussion in 'New Teachers' started by MsBee, Nov 26, 2008.

  1. CanukTeacher

    CanukTeacher Comrade

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    Dec 21, 2008

    Our dean on the first day of my degree said that some teachers think their degree is a waste of time. He said it is only a waste of time if we choose to make it a waste of time. I agree. I had some great profs and a few not so great profs. With those who weren't good I supplemented what I did in class with readings and dialogue with others. I firmly believe that one needs both the practice teaching experience and the theory of an Ed program to prepare oneself for teaching.
     
  2. MsBee

    MsBee Devotee

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    Dec 21, 2008

    Thanks scott!
     
  3. Bumble

    Bumble Groupie

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    Dec 21, 2008

    I was told NOT to do experiments in my class and to yell at the kids. A teacher told me this. Well, I am going to do experiments and I am NOT going to be a screamer. :)
     
  4. Beverly

    Beverly Comrade

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    Dec 21, 2008

    I couldn't believe that my program didn't even have a full semester on teaching math. (For an Early Childhood degree). We also didn't have a classroom management course. We spent A LOT of time discussing family involvement- which is great and important, but the courses were very repetitive in this manner.

    I think that even though the textbook information might be valuable, it is much more valuable when you're working with students in the same age-range as your chapter while taking the course.

    I wish I hadn't gone through the program while working full-time. I have books that barely got cracked open until after I got my certificate.
     
  5. iheart5thgrade

    iheart5thgrade Comrade

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    Dec 22, 2008


    Wow, I can't believe you didn't have a full semester on teaching math! No wonder so many teachers feel inadequate about teaching math!
     
  6. Educator777

    Educator777 Rookie

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    Jan 13, 2009

    What are they teaching you?

    Are they teaching you how to get (and keep) students' attention for long periods of time? 'Cause you can't do ANYTHING else until you know how.
     
  7. Educator777

    Educator777 Rookie

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    Jan 13, 2009

    So, what is this teacher trying to get the kids to do by yelling?
     
  8. ifightaliens

    ifightaliens Rookie

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    Jan 14, 2009

    I didn't HAVE a semester on teaching English at all.
     
  9. Doug_HSTeach_07

    Doug_HSTeach_07 Comrade

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    Jan 14, 2009


    I agree; the skill of captivating a class at the outset and holding that fascination can do wonders for a teacher. It can make the difference between an amazing lesson and a dull one. That, and body language and other forms of nonverbal communication are so important. If you can master both of these areas you're going to have a lot of interested students.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jan 15, 2009

    It's been a very long time since college.

    But some of the things I wish someone there had taught me include:

    - How to get a bee out of the room. Seriously. It's easy: turn off all the lights and open the windows. Bees like light. But anyone who has been in the classroom for a while KNOWS what a disturbance one bee can create.

    - How to get "the look." The one you shoot at a kid that makes words unnecessary.

    -Ways to compensate when a fire drill intertupts a test. It happens every year during my first test-- one of my classes has a fire drill. I've learned over the years to tell the kids not to worry; I'll only grade what they were able to get through. So if Kelly sucessfully completes 60 of the 80 points she got to, she gets an 80%. If John completes 45 of the 60 points he got to, he gets a 75%.
    But the first time it happened, I was in a panic.

    -What to do when you know you've lost too many kids. That it's OK to stop and go back and get everyone caught up.

    -What to do when it seems everyone "needs" to go to the bathroom. I never tell a kid no, but I do say they need to make up the time after school. It cuts out everyone but the actual emergencies.

    There's probably more.
     
  11. CaliGuy

    CaliGuy Rookie

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    Jan 17, 2009

    I've used VERY little of what I've learned thus far in my credentail program. I'm a special ed intern in CA and everything I use in the classroom has come from my previous experience as an aide or from my limited teaching experience thus far. Overall, the stuff I've learned in my credential program I already learned on the job.

    The stuff we get taught in our credential classes is repetitious...Honestly, I can't remember the last time I took any of my credential classes seriously. I do the required work, get an "A" and move on to the next one...Unfortunately, in CA anyway, we don't get any training in actual pedagogy! They teach us concepts, but not how to actually teach effectively!

    On a positive note: all of my classes thus far have been a breeze compared to my undergrad. Leave it to politicians and their infinite wisdom to ruin what could be a good learning experience for teachers...

    You find what works for you and what doesn't...No class in college is going to prepare you (as others said)
     

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