Are today's parents really RAISING their kids?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by scholarteacher, May 19, 2017.

  1. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Jun 25, 2017

    This is happening in all types of jobs. It is a problem everywhere.
     
  2. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 25, 2017

    This is true. I have some students who habitually arrive late (i.e. their parents/chofers are bringing them late). Most schools in the city (I am from California but teach down in Mexico) close their doors at 8:00 a.m. and students may not enter at all (you snooze, you lose). Our school does not do this, so we'll get some student strolling in several minutes after the bell has rung. It drives me crazy because I feel like they don't really value how much each second counts. More than anything, I think that parents honestly don't understand how much happens in a school day, let alone each minute of the school day. This is evidenced when they want/need their child to miss a certain day and ask, "Will they miss anything important?". Well, everything we do is important, so yes.
     
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  3. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Jun 25, 2017

    This just isn't true. There is so much wasted time and so many lessons that take a long time to deliver but can be learned by many in much shorter of a time. Kids know this. Kids know many days are mostly review.

    Kids also know there are wasted learning days for things like the counselor pulling kids for scheduling so the lesson is modified or busy work is done.
     
  4. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 25, 2017

    In that case, I suppose it depends on the teacher. Everything I do in class has importance. Everything. I don't teach long-drawn out lessons. I give mini-lessons that gives everyone something valuable that they can use, regardless of where they are at. I never give busy work. Never. Instead, I teach my students to be independent workers who can make important decisions about what to work on next, and problem solve since I can't be next to each once at each given second of the day. They do this in reading and writing workshop. Every second is put towards them working. If a teacher is not making the most of his or her time, then I would encourage that teacher to do some self reflection: Here's an example of one my mini-lessons. Notice how it doesn't take too much time:
     
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  5. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    Jun 25, 2017

    I won't bother debating this any further because I doubt it would be productive. We will just have to disagree.
     
  6. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Jun 26, 2017

    I guess my point is that if teachers feel their lessons are long and drawn on, and that there is a lot of wasted time, perhaps a reflection and change up might be in order. I hope your comment is not the norm for most schools and classrooms, but if it is, can anything be done to change that? I don't feel that is the case at my school. This could also be because we have a dual English and Spanish program, so time is of the essence (English teachers have about 3 hours & 15 minutes to teach, and Spanish teachers 1-1 &1/2 hours...there is no time to waste.
     
  7. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 2, 2017

    I helped run graduation for my very small DOPR (drop-out prevention / recovery) school. We handed out diplomas to the 13 students (1/10 of the school population) who earned them over a ton of obstacles. Every one of them had at least one parent there. Many of those parents came to the ceremony in uniform from their jobs, some at the very last second. Several hadn't graduated from high school themselves. Those parents I got to meet, thank, and occasionally hug this past week were trying to raise their children (sometimes also grandchildren) under massive amounts of poverty and without many opportunities of their own. They're TRYING to raise their children, but just don't have all the resources they need.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 2, 2017

    In my state there is a law that allows the state to convert a certain percentage of underperforming public schools to charter schools. There is much controversy surrounding this law, and there is even more shadiness about how the process actually works. For example, the for-profit charter company seizes control of the school, fires all the teachers, and hires its own staff. The public school district remains financially responsible for the upkeep of the property, though. The charter company does not need to pay for repairs or upgrades to the building and can demand that the public school district make whatever repairs or upgrades it deems necessary, for as long as the charter company controls the school, which is a minimum of seven years. This is just one example of many questionable terms of the law.

    My point here is that, yes, teachers can and do get fired for low test scores. Now that more and more states are moving to a scores-based evaluation system, it's only going to get worse. Next year a full 40% of my teacher evaluation is directly tied to student scores. Mind you, I am not a classroom teacher and have little control over who comes to me for support and services and how often. I'm still subject to that requirement, though, and it frightens me.
     
  9. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Jul 3, 2017

    The same thing has happened in my area. Prior to this actually happening, many people said it was all just "scare tactics" and schools would never actually get taken over for poor scores. It's been happening for a couple of years now. I believe the law in my state is that when a school gets taken over, admin and at least 50% of the teachers have to be fired. So at an absolute minimum, half of the teachers at those schools will lose their jobs. When the charter company takes over, they often use shady practices to kick out students with severe academic, behavior, or other problems. For example, this happened at a friend's school where the population was about 30% refugee students. The charter company said, "We're not in a place where we can hire an ELL teacher our first year." They do the same with SPED students; they'll only accept students with very minor disabilities because they can say they don't yet have the staff to serve students with other needs. They also typically cut transportation, which means the lowest SES families aren't able to get there because they don't have the resources to drive the kids to school and pick them up every day. They don't have to follow the same rules as public schools, and then if they do get better test scores, it's often used as political propaganda for privatization.
     
    Last edited: Jul 3, 2017
  10. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    No, they do not look at growth. They look at proficiency.

    They certainly can use other methods of evaluation, but they do not. This is what they've chosen to do. This year 20% of my eval was based on student scores.

    You can certainly say that it's just politics, but in my state and district this is very real. It's happening. Present tense.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I know...?

    I'm saying that it's not some scare tactic.
     
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  12. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jul 3, 2017

    No it's not. Teachers can choose to simply leave like I am doing, and more and more teachers are currently doing. Our department had an 80% turnover rate this year, and it's been similarly high in the past. The teachers who know that they deserve to be respected more for their teaching abilities are leaving the profession in higher and higher numbers, and pretty soon the only educators left will be those who feel that the low pay is suitable for their low skills (i.e. only brand new teachers who will come and go as soon as they realize what a terrible deal they've been handed and realize that the work isn't worth it or teachers who will put in as much work as they think they're being paid for and simply babysit).

    People always complain about how hard it is to get rid of bad teachers. Well in the future nearly 100% of the teachers will likely be these "bad teachers" who view the profession as something akin to a part-time low-skill job. A few states are already removing credentialing and certification requirements for their new hires, or any teacher training whatsoever.
     
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