Are there no professional standards anymore?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Jenny G, Aug 24, 2007.

  1. Jenny G

    Jenny G Companion

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    Aug 24, 2007

    We were given permission to try and hire a new 5th grade teacher a week ago. We interviewed someone on Tuesday who wanted to work at a Title 1 school and fed us a complete line. The principal called her on Wednesday and we started emailing back and forth. Forward to Thursday, when she goes in to sign the contract. Signs the contract, then calls 15 minutes later because a better district called and offered her a position. Now she wants out of the contract. My district, in a deal with her new district, is requiring her to fulfill the contract until we can hire someone else.

    I know time was running out and she was getting a little desperate, but if she thought there was the slightest chance she would get hired by this other district, she should have waited to give us an answer. Now we are stuck with a teacher that doesn't want to be there.

    It's going to be such a great year! (Said with extreme sarcasm) :unsure:
     
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  3. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Aug 24, 2007

    Very unprofessional to say the least... but you know what? What goes around comes around and I have a feeling her dream district may not turn out to be such a dream.

    If you make a commitment - stick with it!
     
  4. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    Aug 24, 2007

    Here in Texas, a district can hold your certificate until the end of the year if you resign in the middle of your contract. No other district (public, anyway) would be able to hire you.
     
  5. wldywall

    wldywall Connoisseur

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    I just have to say I don't understand all of this stuff about a dream district....I don't get it. So you find a school with nicer building, or richer parents? Does that mean you will have a trouble free career? NO. I teach in a district taht isn't that rich, but totally poor, we, uh struggle. The district my kids go to is one of the richest around (umm, one of the 20 physical ed classes is ....sailboating) they just spent two years on a new stadium complex. Our school has the state champion football team for the last few years, ours is old. What do we have the rich district doesn't have? Every core subject teacher has an LCD projector, clickers, and access to many movies from the ISD we order on the TV and they play at the time requested, no more movies checked out when you need them. Does the rich district have this? NO

    So I guess what is it you want in a district? Many times you just don't know until you ACTUALLY TEACH THERE!

    I am sorry your school is left in the lurch by this teacher, I hope you find another one soon, I am sure there are plenty out there still looking for work.
     
  6. jaruby

    jaruby Companion

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    I got into my "dream district" so I do see that appeal. I found out this summer its not just me that sees that too. I have been on the bad side of my "dream district" all summer. I was laid off this year and was given glowing recommendations teachers thru the superintendent. I started applying to other district and was asked/told by principals and HR depts "we would love to give you an interview but we need to know what will happen when you old district calls you back." Apparently they didnt believe me when I told them I wouldn't go back. I did get one interview but after they found out my situation and where I was laid off from the principal told me he I cant risk them calling you back in the middle of the year because I would leave if I was in your position."

    But the lady should have informed you there was another district she was waiting for and ask if you would wait.
     
  7. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    What does "dream district" mean anyway? Is it only the money? Honestly......... I know a lot of people in different districts, and though some pay more than others essentially..... the headaches, paperwork, standards, you name it are always there....

    I student taught in a wealthy distict, and taught in a very poor district. The major difference to me was parental involvement. Too much and not enough.
     
  8. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Aug 24, 2007

    That is completely unprofessional and ridiculous!

    However, on the subject of dream districts, I do have one. It actually pays less than many around it, but it is exactly where I would want to live and a place where I would want my (future) children to go to school. This district has a pretty wide range of school sin different neighborhoods and each of them has a variety of good and bad points. It would probably come down to the people that I would be working with as a deciding factor, not money SES.
     
  9. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    Aug 24, 2007

    Let's look at this from the other side. I understand that contracts are binding, and that you should hold your own word in high regard. Professionalism in any job is important.

    However, to play devil's advocate...

    I honestly do not know what the job market is like for teachers in California, but where I am it is crazy. There are no jobs. Colleges (mine at least) are instructing students that when a job comes along, to take it take it take it because it might be the only job available to you for a looooong time. We are all feeling the pressure, and any job that someone offers to you is something that you want to grab at and hold onto.

    But what if this girl didn't call 15 minutes later, but a week later (although, again, in our job market I think asking a district to wait for an answer would make me very nervous- there are just so many people that would say yes in the blink of an eye, I wouldn't know if they would wait for me, and I might blow my only shot at a job! But I digress)? Let's just say she agreed to take the position, but already had an interview set up for later on in the week in her "dream district" and went on it just for kicks. Maybe the "dream district" is offering her a better position, better pay, and it's much closer to her home (gas is expensive!!!!). Of course she made a commitment to your school, but on some level doesn't she have to look out for herself and her own future? Perhaps she has children to think about? Travel time is key when you have a little one waiting in daycare to be picked up. And if she were in our job market, this would probably be her only chance for a long time to get into a position where she could get a job in that "dream district."

    I am not saying what she did was right, or that it would even be the right thing to do if the above scenario was completely true...but I am saying that I can understand why people do these things.

    To add, if she WAS in my area, there would be at least 100 people chomping at the bit to interview for the spot she gave up...I don't think it would take very much to get someone else in there!! If the job was in New York, I'd come take her spot for you! ;)
     
  10. jaruby

    jaruby Companion

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    I understand what you are saying rich or a poor they are all kids and basically the same, all of the hard annoying stuff you mentioned happens too, but I guarantee there is some district around you, you would rather work at for some reason or another. That could be you "dream district". I dont know how it works for other people but this is what makes the district I am in my "dream district" it is the one I wanted to work for, it is close to my house, it pays well, we have very high test scores, it's graded A by the state of Michigan, we have parental involvement, almost all graduates go to college, the schools are newer, its a smaller district so everyone knows everyone even the superintendent, as a whole the kids are pretty good, Personal... I can bring my kids there without living there, each grade has one science teacher so I only have one prep.
     
  11. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Aug 25, 2007

    I've said it over and over again here: my word means something. If I say I'm going to do something, I do what's within my power to get it done. I think it's professional and it's how adults behave. I would hope that I'm bringing up my kids to value their own word as well.

    I know many people here disagree with that standard, since we've all seen numerous posts about how to back out of a job that's been agreed to. But if I didn't want a job, I wouldn't take it. Once I had taken it, I would no longer be on the market. In my mind it's pretty simple.
     
  12. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    On the flip side, what if, just after the contract was signed, a new candidate walked into the school with better qualifications, more experience and impeccable references--she or he is the perfect candidate (the "dream teacher") for this position? It would certainly be better for the school to have the new candidate--could they back out of the contract? :2cents:
     
  13. Mamacita

    Mamacita Aficionado

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    I agree with Alice. If a person's word means nothing, how could such a person ever be trusted in ANY aspect of life? To try and weasel out of something you've promised to stick with because something "better" came along, is an indication of a weak and unreliable person.

    I apply that standard to all of life, by the way. . . .

    The Amish built our house. There was no paperwork of any kind involved; the deal was sealed with a promise and a handshake. Both sides kept all promises.

    My marriage has had its ups and downs over thirty years. We kept our original promises because we are the kind of people who keep promises, and because we knew that sometimes the 'better' comes AFTER the 'worse.'

    So it is with all of life, too.

    If I gave my word that I would do something, nothing but a health crisis of incredible proportions would prevent me from doing it. My parents raised me not to make promises lightly, and that once made, a promise can be an accurate indicator of a person's integrity.

    So, should a person renege on a contract if something better comes along? Absolutely not. And if someone tries to eel out of it, any school is better off without such a person. Perhaps it's good for a school to know up front that some people can't be trusted, and will not be true to their word. I wouldn't want to hire such a person anyway.
     
  14. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Aug 25, 2007

    My "dream district" has nothing to do with pay, rich/poor schools. I just want to teach in the district that is in the town I live in and where my daughter will be attending in 2 years.

    I am sorry this teacher did that to you. I would LOVE to teach 5th grade!! Of course, when a district hires someone, they don't know exactly what kind of person they are getting. It might be a blessing in disguise that this teacher went to a different district.
     
  15. Weazy

    Weazy Comrade

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    Don't rule schools out that are not in the town where you live, or where your daughter will attend. I teach in a district that is neither, and I know a lot of other teachers who do as well, and prefer it that way. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with it, I also know a lot of teachers who teach in the same town they live in and the same school there children attend, and do just fine. Just keep in mind--there are also advantages to teaching away from your howmetown and home district, not to mention, you could be limiting your job possibilities.
     
  16. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I have not limited my search to that district alone. I would just like to ultimately teach here. There are 3 other districts that I have applied to.
     
  17. Miss_snugs

    Miss_snugs Rookie

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    I teach in a town 30 minutes away from where I live. I love it because I can go out without seeing any of my students :haha:

    I think a person's word is so important. But I also get the she has to do what is best for her too. Dream districts don't always turn out to be what people think.
     
  18. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    It's not really the same thing because the school ultimately gets to do the choosing. Many have tons of applicants to choose from. For a prospective employee, they get to say yes or no IF they are called. They don't get to decide to be chosen or decide to be interviewed. So the advantage is on the side of the school. The prospective employee has to not be choosy or risk not having a job. In the end, they have to figure out what's best for them.
     
  19. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    I still have a problem when someone goes back on their word. If you commit stick it out for that year. That is the least you should do. Sure, you may miss a "hot" opportunity- but opportunities come and go( even in this lousy market).

    A deal is a deal. It's cut and dry to me. I can honestly say I would not back out of a contract for a better offer. I'd stick it out and folow through with my commitment. I'm not advocating that you not be able to provide for your family, but shouldn't that be considered before accepting? So if you've committed... it would make sense that you've given thought to the decision beforehand and it's manageable.
     
  20. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I agree w/ you MissFrizzle. Two years ago I took a job in a district 45 minutes away. My contract was signed by the end of June. In mid-July, I received a call from a principal in the town where I lived offering me a 3rd grade position (what I REALLY wanted at the time), the position I took was kinder (which I didnt want at all). Instead of backing out of my contract, I stuck with it. Granted, if I had backed out, they would have had plenty time to find someone else.
     
  21. dreaming_luke

    dreaming_luke Rookie

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    To me this is a question of honest and integrity. Try this with a car dealership. Sign the contract and then say, oh sorry, I saw this car cheaper at the other dealership please cancel our deal. Afraid not people the world just doesn't run this way!!!

    As a teacher, either before or during the interview, ask the questions that you need to ask. Get the info right then and there, if it's not what you want to hear or do, sorry I don't think this assignment is right for me and go on your merry way! But who takes a job, signs a CONTRACT!!!, (remember these are legally binding papers), and either has another interview lined up or tries to back out of something they legally agreed to. What kind of character are we teaching our students?

    Your word with or without a legally binding signature is what you are. Your word! Are you dependable? reliable? responsible? honest? fair? loyal? values? ethics? NO, NO, NO, NO, NO, NO. Well that certainly makes for a good teacher, huh??
    I guess some people teach by do what I say and not as I do.

    I wish karma would come around more often. I worked 1 1/2 hours away from my house, drove every single day in snow, trees falling on the roads in front of the car, big logging trucks and huge mining trucks whizzing by and did this for a few years. We were hiring for a Kindergarten job, principal hired a girl, she came for 3 days, then said she had a job offer in our neighboring school district. We all said she'll most definitely be blackballed here. Well no so, she didn't get the job in the other district and we found out she was teaching in a small elementary classroom in our district. Someone does something like that and they get a good job??? I do a good job and they keep me in butt **** nowhere? OK, Ok ,..... breathe, breath....:whistle: :whistle: I'm Ok now. :blush:
     

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