Are pull outs really beneficial for students

Discussion in 'General Education' started by taylornathaniel, Jan 13, 2016.

  1. taylornathaniel

    taylornathaniel Rookie

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    Jan 13, 2016

    Just as the title states, are pull outs really beneficial for students that need additional help in a content area. Is this service just a distraction from students learning the lesson that is currently being taught in their class, or a services that is helpful. For those that are not aware what a pull out is, it consist of a learning specialist pulling struggling students out of their class to work with them on a topic/content they are struggling in.
     
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  3. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Jan 13, 2016

    I know that there's research out there (I have seen bits here and there in these forums - I don't remember the exact one), but really, I'd say it will vary for each student, and depends on the type of pull-out -- intervention block where it is in addition to instruction, and no new instruction is happening in the classroom, or if it is in replacement of the actual instruction.
     
  4. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Jan 13, 2016

    Depends on the kiddo. Some kids may need the pull out intervention more than the general class lesson.
     
  5. Obadiah

    Obadiah Groupie

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    Jan 14, 2016

    I'd agree that it depends on the situation. On the positive side, students receive assistance from a specialist who is able to spend more time with the student individually or in a small group. On the negative side, other students sometimes belittle the student who is receiving the assistance, and sometimes this is referred to as the dummy class or other demeaning synonyms. I've seen parents develop harshly negative attitudes toward the resource teachers. Often a student who is low in a content area tends to stay low no matter what interventions occur; sometimes I wonder if some students are unnecessarily trapped in a lower group, especially in reading, in an early grade and by the time they reach upper elementary, it's like they're in a pit that they can't climb out of. Sometimes interventions are the same old thing that hasn't worked; I often wonder in those situations if new procedures need to be tried. It's also difficult for the regular teacher to coordinate classwork so that the pulled out student doesn't miss too much of regular class time.
     
  6. renard

    renard Companion

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    Jan 14, 2016

    Pullouts work when done appropriately, for the right reason and with the right staff. I do ELL pullouts (along with very low literacy students who are not SPED) and it works well. They get the opportunity to benefit from 1:1 or 1:2 intense review of the basic fundamentals. I use quality materials, including nice tactile aids that they would just good around with at a 1:25 ratio.

    On the other hand, I also witness a lot of goofball chit-chat with other paras in pullouts, and that's irritating.
     
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  7. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Jan 17, 2016

    As a reading specialist I spend most of my time pulling students out of class. My teachers know that if it isn't a good time to let me know. I don't pull out during tests or when new topics are being introduced. Depending on the topic, I may push in instead. I'm usually working on missing skills in small groups, so it's beneficial.
     
  8. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Jan 18, 2016

    I prefer my students have an actual tutorial period so they dont miss instruction or other activities. At the high school level pullouts tend to put students behind.
     
  9. runsw/scissors

    runsw/scissors Phenom

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    Jan 23, 2016

    In our building, the principal has blocked protected times when students cannot be pulled. These include whole group math, whole group reading, specials, and guidance. We can only pull during stations, science, social studies, and other unprotected times. This makes scheduling tricky, but the kids get the extra attention and individualized instruction they need.
     
  10. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jan 23, 2016

    In my opinion, at a high school level (as I can't comment about how it is in lower grades) I only see it beneficial if the student is still doing the same lesson we are in class but receives one on one attention from a specialist.
    It drives me crazy when they want to pull out a kid for 30 minutes or for the whole class time and spend time on "English content" but it has nothing to do with my lessons. The kid is now off track, misses what we went over and in next class won't know what's happening, won't have the work completed, etc.

    Luckily my resource spec. is aware of this, so when she pulled out a student she conferred with me beforehand, I was able to give her the work we would be doing in class and she was able to help him. This way it is beneficial.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2016
  11. Luv2TeachInTX

    Luv2TeachInTX Comrade

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    Jan 23, 2016

    Yes, I do. Some children need small group instruction on their level to be successful.
     
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