Are laid off teachers who are now subbing eligible for unemployment?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by oldstudent, Sep 22, 2010.

  1. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2010

    This morning I spoke with the opinion editor of my local newspaper to discuss the possiblity of writing an article of how fully credentialed substitute teachers can be better used by school districts to benefit contracted teachers and students.

    One of my topics is how we subs are lumped together with other school employees in being denied EDD benefits, although we are not guaranteed work.

    I am interested specifically in California teachers.

    I would therefore like to know if teachers whose contracts were not renewed, and who are currently subbing, were eliglible for EDD benefits over the summer, and/or for days during the year you are not called to work?
    Thanks in advance
     
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  3. Sshintaku

    Sshintaku Comrade

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    Sep 22, 2010

    I believe you are eligible if you make under a certain amount within a time period. There is an automated system on the unemployment website that will calculate whether your are eligible or not.
     
  4. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Sep 28, 2010

    Interesting...never knew that, but I don't think my district does this. (I'm referring to the reply post BTW.)
     
  5. TampaTeacher2Be

    TampaTeacher2Be Comrade

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    Sep 30, 2010

    I am not sure about California, but in the state of Florida, if you have secured any type of employment, you are not elligible for unemployment benefits. Even if you are underemployed, or employed only on a part-time or temporary basis.
     
  6. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    Sep 30, 2010

    I can only answer for NJ.

    In NJ, they calculate what you are supposed to make for unemployment benefits and then subtract what you do make subbing. They will pay you the difference.
     
  7. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Oct 1, 2010

    If you do get to help pen a column, I think that would be GREAT. In the news, all we hear about is the teachers (who have bigger classes, unpaid furloughs), along with the pink-slipped...

    ...the voice that's never expressed is that of the newly-credentialed, who can't find work as a teacher (perpetual sub).

    I would wish that such an article would express the size of this population of teacher (newly-credentialed, subbing), and the plight that they are up against.
     
  8. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Oct 2, 2010

    You are right John Lee!

    But the problem is getting subs to care.

    If most potential subs looked elsewhere for work and refused to sub at high school drop out wages, the sub pool would dry up and districts would be forced to give limited contracts and guaranteed work to credentialed subs.
    Unfortunately, subs still come a dime a dozen, so districts nationwide can get away with keeping us on call with a total absence of perks and low wages.
    Unfortunately, the opinion editor of my local newspaper would only let me write an article about "subs getting shafted" if I used my real name, but I am reluctant to do this for obvious reasons.
     
  9. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Oct 2, 2010

    I do not know exactly. I do know that if a laid off teacher has subbed for 20 days (I think it was 20) in my district and I believe it is due to state ed code, the teacher then goes back to per dieum daily pay for their subbing. This means they will get a lot more than the average sub in the system.

    My guess is this is a way of screwing the RIF teachers even more. The teachers, if they take the sub option, probably lose the option of unemployment. If you have a job you lose unemployment. If the teachers are making considerably less then they may be able to get some money from unemployment.
     

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