are bd kids getting worse?

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by bdteacher, Oct 8, 2006.

  1. bdteacher

    bdteacher New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 8, 2006

    I have been teaching bd kids for a number of years now. It seems they are getting tougher, meaner, and more "out there" all the time. I prefer working with elementary kids, but have been moved to middle school, and am also working with high school kids. I used to love my job, but this year is no fun most of the time. It seems the older kids are really into trying to impress each other with how gangster they are, and some staff memebers don't do anything about it. Of course, this just means it is ok to misbehave! I have a new kid that denies it, but I am certain has gang affiliations from his former state. Another new kid is fresh out of a max. security juvenile detention center. So many seem to be living only to be rough and impress each other with toughness. The principal is often away on administrative issues, etc. Right now I can't sleep well, and have a constant knot in my stomach because I can't stop thinking about it. That is NOT my style! I have a bad feeling about the way things are going in my school, and fear something "newsworthy" might happen. I realize that the statistical chances are against that, but that doesn't stop the worry. I suffered a permanant injury several years ago due to one of the "out there" kids, and I have decided to go for a new job next year. I am determined to do a good job this year, no lame duck teaching for me. But at my age, (late 50's) I wonder about age discrimination making it hard to get a new job. Probably not if I stick with BD in the age range I like to work in. So.....how do you guys deal with a situation that is eating at you? I'd quit now and get a new job, but they'd probably not release me from my contract, and if I left anyway, they'd probably go for my license. Any suggestions or ideas here? Talking to someone in the district would most likely make me a target, so that is not a good choice.

    Thanks,
    Bummed out on the Job I used to Love!
     
  2.  
  3. Emily Bronte

    Emily Bronte Groupie

    Joined:
    May 28, 2006
    Messages:
    1,265
    Likes Received:
    11

    Oct 8, 2006

    Well, I have worked with the behavior disorder group in the past and I am currently working with the students who meet Aspberger's/autism criteria. I must say that I think that I may rather work with the behavior disorder group. But, in any case, they are likely getting worse. I would say stick out your contract for the year and begin looking for something else in the spring. You will not be able to change their gangsta like attitudes because unfortunately, they live in a culture where all of that stuff is "cool" Being in prison is cool... and so on and so forth. When they mention their gang stuff, I would inform the school resource officer, which I am assuming you have one. Will it stop their gang talk and behavior? No, but at the very least, you have let someone know who can have an impact on keeping a look out and so on. The best thing to do is not let it eat you up.
     
  4. thelonius

    thelonius Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2006
    Messages:
    45
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 8, 2006

    My first special ed. class consisted of 12 students (grades 3-5) with BD. How I ended having to teach three grade levels simultaneously, was the million dollar question. I had my share of horrific stories, but I think most may not be appropriate to write about in this thread.

    Upon their entry in the classroom, they would talk about the devious things that they did the day before, and they made it sound like it was the "coolest" thing to do. They would talk about the items that they've shoplifted from the supermarket in their neighborhood, or the bricks that they would throw over the fence while crossing the bridge, as they watched the cars pass by the interstate below them, etc. In the classroom, there were incidents where I had the teacher's desk against the door, to keep them from running outside. I think I broke up more fights than I actually taught them; I'd been spat and cursed at by these youngsters numerous times. The things that I experienced look like scenes from a Hollywood movie, except that it was really happening. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. I would love to share more stories, but I'd rather not due to the "inappropriate" nature and content.

    Considering what I had experienced and endured in the two years I taught these children, I will admit that they are getting tougher and displaying more aggressive outbursts than ever before. Overall, the youngsters I taught were very bright and intelligent ... there was just something about the baggage that they bring to school with them, and their feelings and emotions that they were unable to cope and/or contend with.
     
  5. bdteacher

    bdteacher New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2006
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 9, 2006

    The things that I experienced look like scenes from a Hollywood movie, except that it was really happening. And that's just the tip of the iceberg. I would love to share more stories, but I'd rather not due to the "inappropriate" nature and content.

    Considering what I had experienced and endured in the two years I taught these children, I will admit that they are getting tougher and displaying more aggressive outbursts than ever before. Overall, the youngsters I taught were very bright and intelligent ... there was just something about the baggage that they bring to school with them, and their feelings and emotions that they were unable to cope and/or contend with.[/QUOTE]

    YES! This is what I am talking about. Some are really cool kids. But the very aggressive non-caring kids are ruining it. It seems to me like we need some special therapeutic school situation for the hard core kids, so the ones that are merely emotionally disturbed can learn to become students and citizens. The rough ones are contagious, and it seems that isolation from the ones that can/want to learn will be able to succeed. We have kids that have served hard time, certified psychotic kids, schizophrenic, etc. Plus the ones that are growing up in criminal homes that fight the schools every step of the way. Why do some families/areas seem to actually embrace failure as being the best thing to do? After this year, unless some miraculous thing happens, I'm hanging up this field, and will teach something else. For what it's worth, I'm not a bonehead, not a sniveler, not a grump or tyrant. I have had many years of happy teaching success, including reg. ed., gifted, and b.d./e.d..
    Later, all, a teacher and proud of it!!!(tired of trying to teach those that despise education)
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 367 (members: 2, guests: 338, robots: 27)
test