AR Incentives??? Do you do?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by laughinglady, Jul 20, 2007.

  1. laughinglady

    laughinglady Rookie

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    Jul 20, 2007

    I teach third grade and we are big on AR (accelerated reader) but we don't use the tests as grades so there are always some students who just don't want to read and take the tests so this past year I gave each student an individual goal every six weeks and if they made it, I bought them lunch from like McDonalds. This got pretty expensive and I was wondering if somebody does something different that works for them?
     
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  3. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

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    I set class goals. For ever week, the students have to earn at least 1 more point. They also have to read a certain number of non-fiction books by the end of the year as well (like 35). Those are just my expectations. However, I would think as incentives you could do something at the end of every 9 weeks. Say, for everyone who met the goal of adding on 9 more points would get a certain prize. Of course I'm also going to be looking at their comprehension level to in order to make sure they aren't just getting points but that they are understanding what they're reading too.
     
  4. shasha379

    shasha379 Devotee

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    We have AR parties if students meet the goals. My school is big on AR too. I hated to have to bribe the students to take AR test, but it worked.
     
  5. Ms. Jane

    Ms. Jane Companion

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    I also have AR parties at the end of every term. The students who reached their individual AR goals got to go to the parties, but those who did not reach their goals, were not allowed to go.
     
  6. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    I don't have specifics yet, but I was thinking of doing an incentives chart and putting stickers up every time they got a certain number of points-maybe around 5? Then when they have maybe 5 stickers they can get something out of the "treasure box." Maybe if everyone in the class reaches a goal we could have a party.
     
  7. laughinglady

    laughinglady Rookie

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    These are good ideas. Thanks for sharing.
     
  8. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I taught kinder and so I haven't had any real experience with AR yet, but I thought that the program iteslf is supposed to motivate kids to read. Aren't there points involved??
     
  9. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    For my upper grades last year and for my intermediates this year, I will continue our school-wide policy of using AR points toward their Reading grade. I think that's pretty good incentive and it works for us. But then again, I work at a school where the kids really do worry about their grades which makes this a lot easier. I've worked places where this would not have worked and they would have needed a "bribe".
     
  10. Scout About

    Scout About Rookie

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    This is kind of boring, but I do a classroom economy, and those that meet their AR goal receive $20 and those that don't have to play me $20. I'm not huge on AR - it's the kind of program that motivates some students, but others couldn't care less. Meh...
     
  11. Go 4th

    Go 4th Habitué

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    I just posted this link on another site, but it may be helpful to you also if you want to do cheap incentives or a treasure box. www.goodtimeattractions.com
     
  12. yclark

    yclark Comrade

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    Our school does AR parties but for all the effort we have to put into it the kids aren't always impressed. Last spring it was Flip-flops and Popsicles. It was fun to walk down the hall and see the kids in their flipflops because they saw it as a status symbol for the day. The popsicles were fun but as soon as they ate them the teachers in charge were telling them to line up and go inside. I thought they deserved some playground time since we don't get recess at our school and I deserved a break after so much time encouraging AR. We still ended up having to go in early because the big kids were running over us after they had their popsicles and I couldn't let them be hurt.

    Our school also does something with the word count. Our school name is Mac....... so kids who read one million words get in the MacMillionaire's club. Last year we had 8 out of a school of less than 300 and the year before we had 20. This goal is impossible for my first graders so I let them get through Christmas to see how many words they are reading and then work for a class goal. We went for 100,000 and everyone got a snack sized 100Grand candy bar when we made it. I printed up a huge 'check' and presented them with the candy and then hung it in the hall. They were thrilled. The principal loved it too. I also gave awards for kids reaching an individual goal of 10,000 words.
     
  13. hawkteacher

    hawkteacher Comrade

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    Yes and no.

    The kids who are already motivated to read are motivated with AR, but the ones who aren't motivated to read just see it as another task.

    I can't tell you how many kids I've seen take the test without comprehending or sometimes even reading the book! (This was during my science practicum so I wasn't directly involved with AR).

    My new district uses AR, so I'm curious to see how it will go there.
     
  14. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Quote: "The kids who are already motivated to read are motivated with AR, but the ones who aren't motivated to read just see it as another task."

    This comment isn't directed towards you, but what is the problem with students having "just another task"? That is what school is all about...learning, completing tasks when sometimes you'd rather be home swimming or playing on the internet. Don't get me wrong, I sometimes use incentives to motivate my students as well, but...I don't know...we shouldn't have to for everything. I also want to make learning as fun as possible, but it won't always be. I know I shouldn't necessarily compare the school of today from the school of yesterday, but having to bribe the kids to read a book...can you imagine that 20 years ago? Perhaps you were bribed, but I read because I was told to. How many math teachers throw parties for learning your multiplication table (or whatever)? Not many. And they shouldn't. Reading just seems to be an area where teachers struggle to get students "on task."

    I'm not trying to be so negative, but it is somewhat sad.

    Furthermore, what is the issue with not being able to count AR as a grade? Surely it's not that they can cheat, because they can cheat at everything! I just don't understand that, so if someone could please explain that I would truly appreciate it...I'm curious.
     
  15. ekuchar

    ekuchar New Member

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    FarFromHome: That is EXACTLY what I do! I even have a treasure box! I put one sticker up for every point, and I get a new chart for every 9 weeks. The kids get different rewards for every "mile marker". (It's a racecar chart). The first mile marker is at five points (pick from the treasure box). The second mile marker is at 10 (they receive 10 points on their rewards chart -- to buy "rewards") The third mile marker is 20 points -- (They get to choose two classmates to bring on a dinner party in my room... candles, table cloth, and everything!) The mile markers start over at the end of the nine weeks. My students are only allowed to read books within their level. To ensure this, I make a book mark for them that has their level range on it. They get a new book mark if their level goes up. My classroom library is color coded according to lexile level. That way they can easily find a book within their level.
     
  16. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    I may keep a treasure chest this next year for every 10 points they earn since I have a lot left over from my Scholar Dollars in the past. But if I go too loony, Lindsey (who had the highest amount of points in the school last year) will be very rich and I'll be very poor, because she had something around 350 points. And since I'm advanced reading, she'll certainly be present. Ermmm...

    When they reach 100 points, they do get a group celebration (pizza or something like Chick-Fil-A) with me. They also get to order a book from Scholastic Book Fairs when they get to 150 points. They all (those above 100) go into a drawing for an item at the end of the year (it would be cool to have a boogie board since my theme for it is Catching the Reading Counts Wave). (I'm sorry to the college friend I took the surfing idea from. :( I'm not normally like that, but I really, really liked it.)
     
  17. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I found this last night. If you look at the picture and scroll down, she has AR house points that goes along with her Harry Potter theme.

    She doesn't explain how she does it, but here's my take. She splits her class into four houses. They read and take the tests and their points are added together to make up the house points.

    [​IMG]
     
  18. msb

    msb Rookie

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    That's an awesome board! I think I'll have to do something like that next semester! :) Thanks for the ideas!
     
  19. BeachBum

    BeachBum Rookie

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    The media specialist at my school sets a goal for each child, so an awesome reader may have a goal of 90 points, while my low readers may just have a goal of 20 points.

    Does anyone else do this?

    All of the school wide incentives are centered around percentages. You get to go bowling or something else if you meet 100% of your goal. Last year, I did a sticker chart for my class, and each student received a sticker for every 5 percent milestone. I also set date guidelines for 25, 50, and 75 percent. ("You'll be on track to meet your goal if you have 25% by September 20.")

    I'm interested in hearing more about your goal systems.
     
  20. sundrop

    sundrop Cohort

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    First let me say that our students start using AR in 4th grade and use it through 8th grade. The pts earned carry over and keep accumulating from year to year. For AR I have prizes at every 5 points up to 25 points to encourage the new AR participants to keep going and then at 50, 100, 250, 500, 1000, and 1100+ pts. At 250 we have a Wall of Fame for students' pictures with their favorite book. At 1000 students get their name engraved on a plaque in the library and a $10 bookstore gift card. At 1100+ they get lunch with the principal at the end of the school year.

    I created a wall in the library with the title "The Sky's the Limit" with clouds that have points on them from bottom to top. Every student's name is on either a hot air balloon or an airplane and is in the sky according to the number of points they have earned. I change this at the end of each quarter which is also when I award prizes.
     
  21. SouthernTeach

    SouthernTeach Companion

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    My grade level throws a party at the end of each nine week for the students who meet their goal. We make it something extra special, like a field trip bowling or a movie field trip. The grade above us has taken theirs skating and they always have a huge kickball tournament at the end of the year for just the ones who have met their AR goals. You can bet no 5th grader wants to miss that kickball tournament!
     
  22. teachbsw63

    teachbsw63 New Member

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    My school is really "big" into AR. Our PTO helps fund the incentives. K-2 grades have things for a certain amount of points like football, basketball camps (for boys mostly) or tea parties for the girls. Grades 3-4 give concession stand coupons (20 points), McFlurries (40 points) AR water bottle with school name on it (60 points) a reading medal (80 points) lunch at pizza parlor with the principal (100 points), principal for the day (120 points), skating party (140 points) and on and on......... The students love being principal because they can carry the walkie talkie and go into classrooms to "help". Our school does spend alot of money on AR, but the benefits are many. We make sure they are reading on level and the percent correct is at least 85% before they are rewarded. It is a job to keep up with everything on a daily basis, but most of us find that it is worth it!
     

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