Appealing to emotion

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by John Lee, Jul 18, 2013.

  1. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Jul 18, 2013

    What place, if any, do you think appeals to emotion have in the hiring process? A lot? Some? None?

    I think this particularly applies to newer teachers, who lack the experience and accomplishments with which one would like to simply stand on. Sometimes you feel like it is your best/only shot, saying "I will do the best job ever", or "I won't let you down" (and then going into why) sort of thing.

    When I say appeal, I'm not saying begging or asking for pity. I mean, in some way trying to play at aspects other than your job performance/ability, that might elicit: sympathy, sense of obligation, etc. I mean, instead of getting into the technical aspects of your ability, going in with more rah-rah, go get'em aspects (of why you would be great).

    Do employers generally look at these things in a positive or negative light? I don't have an interview planned or anything. Like I said, I just think it is difficult to compete with others who have the background that you can't match, because you can't ever land a job that will allow you the opportunity to earn the background--because you lack a background... If you know what I mean.
     
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  3. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    Jul 18, 2013

    I am a "new teacher," finished my internship in December and was hired in November before I even finished the internship.

    I went on two interviews and was offered both positions. In one of the cases it was the was the school I interned with so they didn't want to interview anyone but me. The other job I interviewed with offered me a job on the spot, I ended up going with the school I interned with.

    I think experience is a huge determiner, but if you have confidence I think it snuffs out experience every time. Mediocre teachers can be experienced and exceptional teachers can be newbies, so going in there and having the disposition of "I am a great teacher...this is why," stands a much better chance of getting you a job than playing on emotions, IMO. In fact, I leave emotions other than passion for my job and passion for my students' at the door when I interview.
     
  4. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    Jul 18, 2013

    I don't like to say stuff like that. Its my personality though and I would probably take someone less serious if they used phrases like that. I only went on a few interviews last year and they were so straight forward with their questioning that I don't think it would have done me any favors to "embellish" my answers with those types of phrases. They wanted to know in plain speak why I would be a good teacher at their school.

    I know what you mean about being inexperienced and having a hard time answering some questions. During my interview they asked me that classic "what are your strengths and weaknesses as a teacher" question. The strengths were easy to come up with but my weaknesses were harder to come up with on the spot. I panicked and just said that I was a new teacher and that I may not know the best way to handle every situation. I did emphasize that I was however always open for suggestions and easy to work with. I thought I blew it but they called me back so I guess it wasn't so bad.
     
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Jul 18, 2013

    In my case, and everyone's is different, it was my passion for working with under-served students that caught my principal's attention. In a way, it was emotional.
     
  6. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Jul 18, 2013


    I think the key is to indicate that you're open to suggestion and searching for ways to make yourself better. I know someone who was fired from her last two teaching jobs. She's not forthcoming with all of the details, but personality-wise I've found that she knows it all. I suspect that may have been a big part of her problem. That attitude rarely plays well in the educational world. Administrators and co-workers respond much better when they feel like they're mentoring you. And really...who is in a position not to be able to learn from another person's experience? Make sure interviewers know that you're confident, but not superior.
     
  7. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

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    Jul 19, 2013

    I think that if you are a solid candidate but one who may lack experience, showing enthusiasm and a willingness to grow can help. Shows that you are good raw material. I think it depends on whether or not they want a newbie on board. Some p's do and some don't.
     

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