Anyone tried 123 Magic?(Woo--a bit wordy, sorry!)

Discussion in 'Behavior Management Archives' started by maggiedoodle, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. maggiedoodle

    maggiedoodle Rookie

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2005
    Messages:
    34
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 21, 2006

    Hello! As a relatively new teacher, I need some advice! I am a special education teacher (grades K-2) with a mixture of some self-contained students and some resource students. It's been a GREAT year...We haven't had a single serious behavior problem. With the one group who does get 'silly', I keep a tally of the times they are not following directions. We count the tallies at lunch & the end-of-day, and for each group of 5 marks, they owe 5 minutes of recess/free time. They really have done well, and the time is now hardly ever taken away!
    Ok, now I'm getting a new student who was on the "card' plan in her previous school. They feel pretty strongly that she needs a very structured plan, so I'm trying to implement one. I'm not a fan of the "cards"...for many reasons. I'm thinking of trying the 123 magic plan where there are two warnings, then a time out. I'm planning on using a stoplight visual aid. I will obviously need to do it for the whole class, as I don't want her to stand out anymore than she does. We're coming back from vacation, so it seems like a reasonable time to start. However, we don't change a lot of things in the classroom, and for this group, consistency might be the key to their success.
    So after all that, I guess I have 2 questions:
    I'm just wondering if anybody else has ever tried this approach in a classroom, and what your feelings were?

    Also, has anybody switched behavior plans so late in the year? Any tips on making it smooth? I'm hoping it just kind of fades into the background since behavior hasn't been an issue, but I want it to be useful for the new little one.

    Wow-if you're still with me after all that, you deserve a medal! Thanks in advance for any tips!
     
  2.  
  3. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2004
    Messages:
    6,367
    Likes Received:
    1

    Apr 21, 2006

    I can answer one of your questions. I have used 123 magic with several kids in the past and I have enjoyed using it. It is simple to use, for the teacher AND the students. It lays out the expectations pretty clearly for the kids and it isn't too complicated for them to understand. I have used this mostly with kids with severe ADHD and I have had a lot of success with it.
     
  4. AspieTeacher

    AspieTeacher Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    406
    Likes Received:
    0

    Apr 30, 2006

    Time-out isn't effective for avoidance of task!

    Maggiedoodle,

    I would suggest you figure out what kind of behavior these students are showing. Are they attention-seeking, avoidance, escape, ect? Time-out is effective in very short increments but it doesn't work with students trying to escape or avoid tasks. A functional behavior analysis will help you determine what are some of the specific reasons for their behavior choices. It will be very difficult if the behaviors are sensory seeking though. The students need to be monitored more closely to determine their function of these behaviors.
    remember: ABC? A=antecedent (what occurs before the behavior) Behavior-laughing, running, talking, yelling, pacing, ect. C=consequence (what occurs?) attention from teacher, staff, avoidance of task, escape from task, ect. This method is extremely helpful in determining what causes these behaviors.

    Troy in Los Angeles, Ca
    AspieTeacher
     
  5. RSHERFIELD

    RSHERFIELD Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Messages:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 2, 2006


    I have used 1-2-3 magic with some of the kiddos I see, but only after doing what you have suggested. You are absolutely right--if the behavior is for avoidance then a time out isn't going to work because the child is just getting a break. I would definately recommend using the ABC method and trying to get to the bottom of why the behavior is occuring before you focus on trying to get rid of it.
     
  6. munchkin

    munchkin Cohort

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    0

    May 6, 2006

    wow, it must be hard to get a new student so late in the year, and to have to change your behavior plan for just one child. Won't this cause alot of confusion for the "oldtimers"? Isn't consistency and maintaining absolute scheduling a real neccessity? Especially in special ed? Maybe I am misunderstanding your message. Could you ease her into your plan by using the more familiar card plan with her for a short period of time then ease her into the group plan with maybe a private time to give her the "concrete method" she is needing?
    What is 123magic time?? Don't think I've heard of that one. I am alwaays looking for new ideas to use in the classes I sub in. Let me know.
     
  7. norogo

    norogo Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 26, 2006

    I am curious about the stop light-say the child gets to red and stays in for recess, when recess is over does his name get moved back on to green for a fresh start?
    also say you have like 3 kids on yellow and then stay there for the day, what happens the next day?
     
  8. cmorris

    cmorris Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2005
    Messages:
    356
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 3, 2006

    According to the training I had, once a child reaches "3" (or red), s/he gets a consequence. Then they start over. You repeat it as often as necessary. The key is to avoid lengthy discussions--"That's 1," "That's 2," or "That's 3--give me five." The five is where the child owes you five minutes of whatever consequence you dole out, like time-out, silent lunch, recess time, etc. If a child stays on "2" or yellow, it is just a warning/reminder.
     
  9. norogo

    norogo Rookie

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2006
    Messages:
    61
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 3, 2006

    okay-thank you for the info
     
  10. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2005
    Messages:
    4,896
    Likes Received:
    5

    Jul 3, 2006

    I would not change your whole classroom behavioral plan for 1 student. I also have a K-2 s/c class and I have a whole class behavioral plan but I have separate individual plans for students who need it. Just explain to the other students why this student needs an individual plan -- you could set it up at her desk or on a wall beside her desk. As long as she is experiencing consequences for inappropriate behaviors the other students will not fuss about it. You should not worry about her standing out and you cannot be constantly changing your classroom behavior plan for each new student that you get -- this will be very confusing for your other students; consistency is very important.

    I am not sure of her disability but you may want to contact her last teacher to see if she thinks that she could handle a change in behavioral plans -- how long would it take her to learn a new one? Does she need to physically flip the card/change her lights? What kind of consequences did she get at her old school? I think you may have to come up with some other consequences for her behavior besides time out. I have some students who will love to misbehave to be able to sit in time out and do nothing:p .

    Ask her old school to send her old functional behavioral assess. forms.
     
  11. TeachBD

    TeachBD Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2006
    Messages:
    93
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 7, 2006

    I know 1,2,3 Magic works wonders for some people, but for my own son, it was like "Okay, I have 2 more chances to do this!" after 1. You just never know how things will go.
     
  12. JustWondering

    JustWondering Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2006
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2006

    I read that book to try and get ideas about handling my argumentative 3 (now 4) year old. It only works when you are consistent in using it, consistent in punishment, and did I mention consistent? :) Another thing I remember about reading that book was when they start to use the first warning as a buffer for doing it again then you cut back to two. That's 1, then skip that's 2 and go straight to take five or whatever the punishment is. Of course you discuss with the child that there will be a change in the count.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Ima Teacher,
  2. vickilyn
Total: 263 (members: 2, guests: 241, robots: 20)
test