Anyone have a good one-liner?

Discussion in 'High School' started by a teacher, Apr 22, 2016.

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  1. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    I choose to express disappointment and natural consequences, rather than disrespect, and craft consequences in such a manner. You might choose differently, but it sounds as though this is what most here would do. Consequences are fine and are definitely necessary, but in order to drive change (which I'd imagine is what our job is...), they should reflect the situation, and not be out of a need to vent.
     
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  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Nah. It just shows the students your true nature and the good ones will then lose respect for you because of how you handle situations that are not optimal.
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    There is nothing wrong with genuinely, warmly welcoming a lost student back into the fold. Being cold or discourteous would only serve to further alienate someone who has been a reluctant learner.
     
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  4. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    I've been told "Hello" works pretty well.

    /sarcasm off
     
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  5. a teacher

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    While they laugh to their friends the next day as they are cutting your class again!
     
  6. a teacher

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    Realistically it takes a lot more than a sarcastic remark here and there to lose respect.
     
  7. a teacher

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    You have to vent regularly otherwise you will take out your frustrations on those who don't deserve it, like the kids who come to class.
     
  8. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    You are correct. I do. As an adult, I've learned how to vent appropriately.
     
  9. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Wow. I am so sorry if this is how things are for you.
     
  10. a teacher

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    It also happens that sometimes these losers aren't just hanging out in the bathroom for 90 minutes at a time but they are sitting in someone else's classes. Can someone please explain to me how a teacher can be so stupid to allow a student that is not theirs to cut someone else's class and sit in their's every day? Have any of you experienced this at your school?
     
  11. a teacher

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    Anyone?
     
  12. miatorres

    miatorres Comrade

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    At my old school, I witnessed several teachers who would allow students to cut classes and to sit in theirs. When I would sub during my prep period, I would catch students attempting to cut class and to sit in the classroom that I was subbing for. They would lie and say that they had permission to help the teacher who I was covering for. I insisted that they return to their assigned classes and reported these incidents to admin. As always, admin looked the other way.
     
  13. a teacher

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    Bizarre isn't it? But what I'd like to know is what is going through the minds of the morons who allow fugitives into their classes. Has anyone ever heard a teacher (so-called) try to justify this behavior?
     
  14. miatorres

    miatorres Comrade

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    Some teachers would claim that the students were helping them in the classroom, which is why they would allow the students to miss their assigned classes. Substitute teachers said that they couldn't find any seating charts or class rosters so they didn't even know that there were a few students in the classroom who weren't actually enrolled in that class.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2016
  15. miatorres

    miatorres Comrade

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    I just remembered another example of teachers who allow students from other classes to sit in their classrooms. In Vergara v. California (which challenges the state's tenure laws), one of the witnesses was a former teacher who testified that he would allow students from other classes to sit in his classroom because the students said that their assigned teacher wasn't teaching anything and they therefore felt that they would be better off sitting in his classroom where he was actually doing his job. It seems like this teacher's main contention was that many teachers who were tenured at his school weren't doing their jobs.

    I disagree with allowing this for several reasons. For one thing, it gives students the message that they can disregard rules and get away with it.
     
  16. GPC0321

    GPC0321 Companion

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    I have/had a student this semester who was only attending school because of a court order saying he had to. He was MIA for the first 3 weeks, then started showing up a few days a week. He started coming but then skipping out early. Our school is very strict about attendance, tardies, and skipping class/school. When a student skips, he or she is written up immediately and given a day of ISS. Three tardies = ASD (after school detention) and failure to show up there results in a day of ISS. The number of days assigned to ASD or ISS goes up if the student continues to skip or come in tardy. And students are only allowed 8 absences per semester or they fail the course no matter what their grade is. We've had students with 90+ averages fail courses due to absences. They are given a chance to make up missed days after school, but if they don't, then they fail. Likewise, students must bring notes from home or the doctor's office to be given an "excused" absence. The only difference between an unexcused and excused absence is that students with an excused absence are allowed to make up work that they missed. We are not required to allow students with unexcused absences to make up their work.
    All that to say, I rarely saw my truant student this semester because he was either not at school at all, had skipped out before my class (he had me at the end of the day), or he was in ISS for being tardy and/or skipping class. He never did any work when he was in class, though I must say he was always pleasant and polite.
    As far as how I treated him? I treated him like any other student. I taught him last year (didn't have the absence problem then), so I know him. I also know his brother dropped out his senior year, mere weeks before graduation. I know drugs are involved, and that his mother rarely even knows where her children are at all, much less what's going on with them in school. He does not live in a supportive environment where education has been a priority. And it's a shame, because he's a smart kid and can be a really nice kid.
    So no. I don't belittle him when he occasionally shows up to my class. He's a CHILD and I'm an ADULT. It makes me sad to see him throwing his life away, but I don't take it personally. His downward spiral isn't because he disrespects me or my class or our school. It's because he's a 16 year old kid with no direction, no support, and no idea how badly he's screwing up his life.
    Making snide, sarcastic comments is what a lot of teenagers do to each other. And they often hurl them at teachers. I'm 42 years old. I'm not letting a 16 year old child drag me down to his level so we can have a pissing match for the entertainment of the class. There's nothing good that will come of that.
     
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  17. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    "Next time someone's teachin', you might wanna get taught"

    Run DMC
     
  18. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    "I've missed you. Where've you been?" Only not sarcastic.

    This line has led students who have cut school frequently and who are generally haters of school to come to my class and make attempts at succeeding and building relationships with me along the way because they realize that I actually want them there and notice when they are gone. In fact that's the case for one of my students this year. He hated school but tells me he finally enjoys coming to school, especially my class. His drug-addict mom doesn't give a crap about him to get him ready to go to school, doesn't make sure he's bathed or fed. He didn't have an alarm clock, so I bought him one. He still messes up every now and then, but a kid that WANTS to come to class? That's worth not nitpicking the few times he doesn't make it (even if they are more frequent than most other students).
     
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  19. Andy Ronon

    Andy Ronon Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2016

    How about "Your Future Paycheck will reflect your absence"
     
  20. Andy Ronon

    Andy Ronon Rookie

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    Jun 22, 2016

    Or The minimum wages are here.
     
  21. Andy Ronon

    Andy Ronon Rookie

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    Before you ask, I'll have fries with that.
     
  22. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Please, NO. First of all, there are a lot of parents who are stuck in low-wage jobs due to no fault of their own. What if you say this to a student who is below the poverty line because his parents (if there are two) are barely scraping by? You've insulted the student and his family. I say this because my last batch of students was 77% economically disadvantaged, so I was extremely aware of the cycle of poverty.
     
  23. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Agreed. If the kid shows up, teach him. If not, don't. If he does come in and cause any major problems, what's the need for drama? He already knows that he's missing school for whatever reason and probably doesn't want some ass-hat teacher rubbing it in his face. And based on PURE stereotypes, can I ask if you are white and the student is Black or Hispanic? If so, do you really need to be THAT guy? I mean you could always play the concerned teacher role and speak with him to find out what's going on? Maybe he'll tell you, maybe not. If school's already not on his priority list, don't make it worse. And maybe just appreciate and celebrate the days he does show up; maybe he is trying but is fighting something bigger than himself? For a lot of these kids it's about survival and school may not be on their check list of things to do anymore. Sadly.

    :(
     
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  24. a teacher

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    All potentially true. But then you are leaving out the majority of kids who cut class because they are bad students and can get away with it. Why do you assume that if a kid cuts class he or she has huge problems in their family? THAT is a stereotype. And then there is the even stronger argument that since the majority of my students have personal problems, but they come to class, what makes those who decide to cut class worthy of special attention in the form of a concerned teacher?
     
  25. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    Because as bad (and perhaps naive) as it sounds, I don't believe that there are "bad" kids. There are just kids who do bad things because bad things have happened to them or there's a serious lack of structure and stability in their lives.
    I understand fully that HS students are old enough to make choices and accept responsibility for their actions (whether to attend class or not) even if they are dealing with "stuff." But I don't genuinely believe that they do it out of malice but rather the crappy circumstances in which they surround themselves. Does the kid's parents call / meet up with you all the time when he does cut class? To talk about what they can do and what he's missing? Or does the phone just ring and ring when you do try to call ? If so, that should tell you something right there.

    It's true, a lot of kids with "stuff" choose to come to school as it's their sanctuary; it's probably one of the only places where they feel safe with structure and guidelines and then you have those who don't. For whatever reason, like I said, feel school is a priority. But I wouldn't label that kid "bad."

    And the reason I'm poking and prodding about stereotypes is because sadly, they usually explain A LOT of behavior.

    Again: there's always a reason for everything we do.

    And I didn't (nor do I believe anyone) said give the kid "special attention," we just said don't be a d*** to him.
     
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  26. a teacher

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    In many ways you are correct. However, you are making a lot of assumptions, thus your analysis is sloppy.

    Firstly, the assumption that all the kids who show up to class regularly (in my classes that would be close to 90%) do so because that is where they find a safe place to be, is wrong. Many of the students in this majority understand the value of their education. They understand that they need to be in school, and many of them love the learning process. If you are a strong teacher, they also look forward to new experiences they can only have in your class.

    Secondly, you assume that kids who cut class have "crappy circumstances". But I would argue that the majority of the kids who show up have rough lives. In many cases, their parents are totally uninvolved just like the kids who cut class.

    So what's the difference between these kids? Those who cut class are the ones who choose to take what they think is the easy way out, or do it to avoid having to work. If this is their attitude, they have lost the right to be respected. Now, to tell you the truth I don't actually mock these students openly. I have found that I can't bring myself to. But many teachers do, and certainly I am not going to sit down with them and have a therapy talk about their problems and why poor Johnny doesn't want to come to class, and "will you please come to class, we miss you." That is where the teacher drops standards and plays to the lowest common denominator. I feel we should always hold students to high standards. And those who choose not to cooperate, well they have chosen to drop out of society. They get whatever comes with this choice and I'm sorry, but the teacher owes them nothing.
     
  27. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    My two basic points: everyone has a reason for their behavior (good or bad) and we could analyze student by student the choices they make. Second, whatever their reasons for showing up to school, or not, just don't be a callus pr*** to the students. Just remember, they're not you. Not all students, unfortunately, value education like you or other students in the room do. Chances are they've had this mentality for a while (probably LONG BEFORE) they entered your class, all you can do is continue to try and teach.
    If I remember correctly, the entire post was What can I say to those students who show up late or come in after not showing up at all? And many points (including mine) were simply: welcome them into the classroom, teach them and don't say anything. If you feel having a heart- to - heart with them won't work and shows them special attention that you don't want to give, fine, don't do it, but just continue to treat everyone fairly and go one teaching like you normally would.

    I'm simply looking at my own students (and my colleague's) when I talk about the students seeking structure, stability and security in the classroom. A lot of ours DON'T get that at home (and worse), and then due to all kinds of crap in their lives, become "those" students in high- school. It's a sad spiral really. If you look at the worst kid in your class and then delve into the family history as well as his academic experiences, you'll probably (but not necessarily see) a pattern.

    And I never said "All."
    Again, there's a reason for everyone's behavior. The kids who show up have their reasons be they extrinsic or intrinsic and so don't the kids who don't. Hell, there are even kids who have amazingly loving and supportive families who would rather skip class to do x,y,z but they all have their reasons (or at least rationalizations). Whether they're "good" reasons or not, is debatable.


    :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2016
  28. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Why do you care so much that some kids don't show up for school and get away with it?? What are you, the school police? I just don't get it. It's like you need a reason to get on them.
    If they show up, they're there, if they don't, they're not. You teach anyways, the kids that are there. If they miss an assignment that's not your fault.
    If they have entitled attitudes and expect you to do all the work to provide them with missed work, I'd get that you'd be annoyed, but that's not even the case here. You just want to harass them for not coming to school.

    During the summer, why don't you step back and reflect on your teaching practices and attitudes towards and about the kids and maybe think of ways that would help you become a more effective and caring teacher.
     
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  29. a teacher

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    Because I already am effective! Duh!
    And nobody wants to be a school policeman here. But your passive attitude will encourage kids to cut class. I'm sure that's what happens.
     
  30. a teacher

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    All your stating is the obvious: everyone has reasons for what they do and many kids have it bad. Tell us something we don't know.
    The issue is how one should look at class cutters, the analogy in the real world for which is criminals.
    And if you don't take them to task for their class cutting, nobody else may.
    Unless you have an amazing Dean who makes the criminals feel horrible for their attitudes.
     
  31. a teacher

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  32. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

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    You can look and feel however you want to. You're not PAID to pass judgment in the classroom! You (and we all) know where some of these kids will end up. You're correct: warm, fuzzy and empathy doesn't work for some students and they will take advantage if you let them. But hard -ass won't work for many students either. Either way, if they're determined not to come to school, they won't. If you give them more of a reason not to, "Wow that guy's a jack -ass!," he'll just continue to skip.

    All you can do is provide an environment where the kids WANT to come to school and continue to encourage and praise those who do.

    Labeling the kids isn't really productive either.
    Some kids already hate school, why make it worse?
     
  33. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    I would express something positive and let the student know you'd like to create a plan to help him/her catch up. These students are expecting/wanting to be admonished so consistant positivity from you will be the biggest surprise.
     
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  34. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    I question cutting class and making that the same as being a criminal. a teacher, after reading this entire thread, it is obvious that you are intent on insulting, ridiculing, or demeaning these students who you have in your crosshairs. You seem, to me, to be vindictive and determined to make a public spectacle of your "criminals." My suggestion is to be an "effective teacher" to the 90% in the classroom and quit trying to trigger the 10% you want to verbally abuse. Not a single one of us will ever know the innermost workings or challenges of those 10%. Perhaps they hate your subject, maybe they are reacting to your cold shoulder. I certainly will never know, but I suspect neither will you. Be the teacher you think you are to the students in class and quit trying to alienate any prodigal student who happens to show up instead of cutting class. Zinging them with a one liner may actually get you in trouble with HIB. You are supposed to be the adult in the room.
     
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  35. a teacher

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    What's HIB?
    I already wrote that I don't actually "zing" them. I was just wondering if I should.
     
  36. a teacher

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    Good points, but the whole idea of mocking the criminal kid is to let them know you know what they are up to and they are not getting away with anything. When you call them out it also lets the other kids know that that kid isn't getting away with anything- that their is accountability in the room. Isn't that important?
     
  37. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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  38. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    It is a shame that you didn't have the sense to know better without having to ask others. But then again, you know my theory with many of your posts. They are designed to get a rise out of others. I wonder how much of that creeps into your classroom.
     
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  39. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Oh so now you assume things and attack me? WTH?
    My attitude is not passive, I'm just not hateful and I don't pick on kids.
     
  40. mathteachertobe

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    I thought the "Duh!" was the cherry on top of that comment. It really made me believe in this person's effectiveness. LOL.
     
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