Anyone had experience w/ RTI (Response to Intervention)?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by ms., Apr 26, 2010.

  1. ms.

    ms. Comrade

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    Apr 26, 2010

    I was told I might be leading RTI/reading next year, it was recommended that I do some research. While I've read the information on the RTI program, I'm not really sure what it's like using RTI as a teacher.

    Has anyone had positive (or negative) experiences working with this program?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 27, 2010
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  3. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    Apr 26, 2010

    We have it at our school... It has been fairly easy to implement. Tier 1 mostly involves testing your entire school group (like district or school benchmark testing). Tier 2 is creating intervention groups for weak areas. Tier 3 is intensive interventions for students who still struggle (and can involve meeting on the student).

    Or, at least this is what we do. It has worked well for us.

    ps- Just a disclaimer... I hope I explained it correctly. It has been a super long day :)
     
  4. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    Apr 26, 2010

    We've decided that
    tier one would be whole class instruction
    tier two would be small group instruction
    tier three would be reading lab or sped....


    I think....like the previous poster said, it's been a long day.

    We do have a committee that attends the RTI workshops. They did show us a video about RTI.
     
  5. cheerfulfifi

    cheerfulfifi Rookie

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    We implemented RTI this year. We have created a half hour intervention block. During this time, students in Tier 2 and 3 (who need more specific interventions and help) work in small groups with a teacher teaching a lesson on a main concept determined by data from baseline/unit tests. These teachers may be the classroom instructor, our special educators pull out kids, and the special teachers (gym, art, music, library) also do lessons. Since it is new this year we have been trying out different methods to see what is best.

    In my classroom:
    During intervention block I focus on a main concept for a week or two. During that time I pull small groups to work on the SAME concept all week. At the end of the time, we assess and see where we need to go next. The rest of my kids are split into other groups playing games, doing silent reading, or another activity.
    Kindergarten this year has tried using pull out, which the special teachers each have an activity they do. The students stay there all week and then rotate, so each special teacher only has one activity that they use every week with different groups of kids. The kindergarten teacher get the opportunity to work one on one with small groups and individuals.
    Third grade has also done something similar but each teacher has taken one of the main skills for reading. Again, same lesson for different groups of kids. The special education teachers help with pull out.

    During this intervention block the entire school is doing intervention block. No one child belongs to one teacher... everyone's student is your student.

    Data, also, is imperative.
     
  6. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    That's my job! :) I was hired as a math RTI teacher. I love my job!

    Okay, so I work with the tier three kids who need small group interventions. Tier 1 is whole class and tier 2 is in class differentiation.

    Definately do the research this summer on RTI and what it is and how you are supposed to run it.

    I'm annoyed at your district that they are not showing you/teaching you/sending you to trainings on what RTI is.

    Anyways, it's pretty complicated and I just suggest looking it up on the internet. Even though I know what it is, I plan to do a lot more research this summer to get new ideas, to make sure I'm on track, to change things around, etc.

    Right now, the way I run my RTI groups is:
    1) I have no more than 6 kids in each group
    2) Each group is no longer than 25 minutes (would like it to be 30, but not enough time)
    3) When kids come in, I give them a math problem to work on. Gives kids who are coming from different classes time to get there, and the kids who are on time, something to do.
    4) Then I do my main teaching based on a standard/objective that they've been struggling on in their classes and from what I've observed. I model a problem first, they have to do it along with me. Then I give them a problem to do on their own. I walk around and watch them do the work. As soon as I see a student doing something wrong, I gently guide them. Then, I have kids come up and explain how they got their problems. I'm trying to get them to do as much think alouds as possible. I have a feeling though that you are probably doing Language Arts, but I still wanted to share what I do in my class. :)

    Next year, I am thinking about taking my groups of 6 students and doing a mini rotation during the 25 minute time frame. I am thinking of doing the first 5 minutes on a problem of the day or mental math. Then, 10 minute rotation where I work with a group of students while the other group works on a different job. Still working out the kinks and I want to look into if that is okay with RTI.
     
  7. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Apr 26, 2010

    Your explanation was great, Loves2Teach!

    Tier II includes our "Strategic" students. Tier II students are those who are high-strategic, mid-strategic, and low-strategic. We have one teacher teaching each of the three levels of strategic students.

    Then we have Tier III students. Those are the "Intensive" students. The intensive students are also categorized as high, medium, and low intensive. Our Resource Specialist takes our low intensive, our RTI Coach takes the mid intensive, and a Reading Clinician (part-time credentialed teacher) takes the high intensive.

    Tier I students are the "Benchmark/Challenge" students.

    All students (except for my GATE students) leave their homeroom classroom for a 30-minute Intervention. First graders leave for the first 30 minutes of school, then second graders rotate, then third, and so on.

    We have done this for 5 years and it works so incredibly well. Our RTI Coach is amazing and she does so much for us.

    It's late and I probably didn't give enough details, but that's pretty much how it works. We have a lot of staff members who assist with RTI!!!
     
  8. Grover

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    My wife is getting the RTI training this summer. From what she's been told so far, though, it seems that the focus is on documenting a whole slew of classroom interventions before a child can be moved into a new tier for out-of-classroom services. I certainly hope that what she has been told is not true- that each classroom intervention will need to be documented for six weeks before the next can be tried, and that a whole range has to be exhausted before moving into another tier. This seems like a huge burden especially for kindergarten and first grade teachers, whose students haven't had much opportunity to go through the process yet.
     
  9. ms.

    ms. Comrade

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    Thank you for all of the responses! I feel like I have a much better framework to piece together how the program works. It's also great to hear positive things about the program. It would be for reading RTI - at least I hope so because that's my licensure area! :D
     
  10. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Basically there is no truly defined RTI. i.e. something everyone can use. It varies state to state. If you like, I can link you to a forum full of advocates who have experienced a variety of RTI methods with their children, and can tell you which ones worked best.
     
  11. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Yes, RTI is about documenting what interventions have been implemented with children. Progress has to be closely monitored in order to make valid decisions for where to go next. Interventions that are done need to be research-based as well-not just what a teacher thinks should be done. Typically, the process involves collecting at least 3 data points before changing approaches.

    Basically, RTI was designed to prevent students who struggle with reading from being labeled as LD. And, if a student is LD, providing specialized instruction through scientifically research based interventions more efficiently. In other words, picking up those students who have "fallen through the cracks".

    The whole process is really designed to help teachers refine their teaching to fit all students, which is a fancy way of saying using differentiated instruction, which we all do anyway, but it gets us to THINK about WHY we do what we do. Not all students will respond to that DI though, so RTI, in a tiered approach, brings those research based interventions to students faster-hence the title RESPONSE to intervention. How does each student respond to the research based instruction they are receiving (here is where the data points become important). We don't need to try to qualify all students who struggle with reading in special education, we just need to identify the problems (fluency? comprehension? phonemic awareness?), and address them. RTI allows us to circumvent, if you will, the special education process and bring appropriate instruction to students who need it.

    **However, special education services may be the student's response to the interventions being taught. It's not about slapping a label on a student-it's about determining which interventions and instructional methods each student needs in order to succeed.

    I think the big misconception about RTI is that it is a program or a time during the day. It is really a philosophy, or an approach to changing how reading is taught in a school. My school is an RTI model school in our state, and we have been through this process for a few years now. Some of the questions that schools need to answer in order to "jumpstart" the process are:

    Does our school believe that all students can learn?
    Is our school committed to scientifically based instruction?
    Do we have a school wide approach to literacy?
    Who is involved in RTI at our school?

    Whew, that was long and windy! I talked a lot about reading, which is what our school's school improvement goal is, but yes, math is involved as well, in much the same way. Research based math interventions are, at least in our experience, harder to come by, but should also be considered.

    DISCLAIMER: I am not an expert! I have had a lot of PD on this topic though, and my school has an RTI team that addresses these issues.
    :)
     
  12. ms.

    ms. Comrade

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    I would love to have that link.

    From what I've previously read about RTI it sounded versatile, that's why I posted on here was I was wondering how schools/teachers use the program. It actually makes sense to me now that they would ask me to be involved with this program. I've always been very big on using research based teaching methods, carefully gathering and recording student growth and aiming to find a way to help all my students learn.

    I also like that from what I've seen the RTI model doesn't seem to be a business scheme at all; I've had a slightly negative experience with a different intervention/whole school model that was for-profit. This other program was scripted, and teachers were let go for not reading word for word the provided script. (This was at an internship I had, I was bored to tears.)
     
  13. Grover

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    Thanks, kcjo, that makes sense. Although it hasn't been implemented in my wife's school yet, it seems that the admin is thinking of RTI in relationship to behavior issues as well as academic ones, which I'm not too sure is a good idea. My other concern, from reading your description, would be that to the degree RTI is systematized, it would tend to circumvent the judgement of the classroom teachers. We all know that not all teachers have the experience or other factors to make good judgements on all these issues, but I'm suspicious of a system that seems geared to make those that do jump through the same hoops as those that don't. Rules are rarely a good substitute for wisdom.
     
  14. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    You're right, Grover, that was probably the hardest part of accepting the whole RTI approach for my school's teachers-what felt like a loss of control. But we have come to realize that while yes, the decision is taken off of teachers' backs-that's just it-the responsibility of the decision making process is taken off teachers' backs. There is no pressure of being "right", or making that decision based on a gut feeling. There is data to back up every decision (or there should be anyway).

    And, one major goal of RTI, is that it saves time by making those decisions right away, instead of trying one thing after another until the right intervention is found. Instead of floundering, a solution is there right away.

    **DISCLAIMER #2: Of course, this is all in theory. Does it always work like that? Nope. If only it were that easy...
     
  15. Grover

    Grover Cohort

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    Well, I'm glad to hear that 'right away' part. People around here are concerned that the net result will be to slow down the process of getting special services for kids.
     
  16. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Hehe...remember that word..."theoretically"...
     
  17. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    Our state mandates 8 weeks of progress monitoring before we can meet on a student.
     
  18. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Pat Quinn. Look him up. :)
     
  19. ms.

    ms. Comrade

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    Thank you! This website I found was just what I was looking for. :D
     

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