Anyone ever skip the student teaching process?

Discussion in 'Student & Preservice Teachers' started by mykids1, Mar 30, 2008.

  1. mykids1

    mykids1 Rookie

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    Mar 30, 2008

    Hi all,

    I'm finishing up my requirments for my master's in childhood ed./spec. ed. I don't have to student teach because of my experience as a TA. In the real world, would I be missing out by not student teaching?

    I don't have a student teaching portfolio, although I do have unit plans, lesson plans I completed for class assignments, plus some fieldwork write ups and plans. What do you think districts would think of this?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. mom2sands

    mom2sands Comrade

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    I was advised against skipping student teaching. I have a friend who took on a job without student teaching beacause she was offered a job. She was a assigned a mentor. She did okay, but it was tough. This does happen, but my student teaching supervisor advised against it if at all possible. I finished my student teaching in December, so I am on the job market as of now. Heck, I wouldn't blame anyone if they're offered a job to take it. I didn't have that situation, so it wasn't an issue.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    The student teaching experience provides a lot of insight into the "other" stuff that goes along with teaching. Taking attendance, dealing with discipline issues, and handling paperwork are often very difficult for new teachers, particularly those who didn't deal with those things much as student teachers.

    The other huge benefit of student teaching is that you have a safety net--your cooperating teacher. Your CT can save you when you mess up, and can hopefully help you avoid messing up too severely in the first place. If you go skip the student teaching process, you also skip the chance to make mistakes in a safer environment.

    I think that for you specifically it would depend on what duties you performed as a TA. Can you elaborate on your job responsibilities?
     
  5. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    I did not student teach and I do not really think that I missed out on anything. My first year of teaching was terrible because I did not have anyone to mentor me. I taught at a very small private school and the entire science department consiisted of 2 football coaches and myself. Had I had someone to ask my questions to, I feel that things would not have been so bad. If there is a good mentoring program, then I personally would skip student teaching.
     
  6. mykids1

    mykids1 Rookie

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    I believe I have done a lot as a TA. I have instructed reading groups, small group instruction, have taken over lessons in emergencies, subbed when needed.
     
  7. Camel

    Camel Rookie

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    For me, the biggest part of student teaching hasn't been learning how to prepare lessons or anything like that. The biggest benefit has been the peace of mind in knowing that after being in front of a bunch of students and handling all of the things teachers go through on a daily basis, I still want to become a teacher. Well, that and learning a ton about classroom management. I am certainly happy that I student taught, but if you don't think it will give you any additional benefit and you're confident in the experience you already have (and confident that potential employers will be fine with this too!) then I suppose it would just be a waste of time for you.
     
  8. Proud2BATeacher

    Proud2BATeacher Phenom

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    I have a friend who did it, but her first year she team taught with a licensed teacher. She was an excellent teacher who went over and beyond but she did say some 'inappropriate' things to her students (things that you say to your teacher friends when you are alone and you'll all have a laugh about it) that made me bite my tongue. She kept telling me that this is how they talked to their students where she taught in Brooklyn and she had quite a few students from Brooklyn.... I know a few of us talked to her about this and it did improve but it didn't seem like the parents of the students minded and I know that they knew what was going on because I did sit in on a few of her conferences with them.
     
  9. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    As a TA I have created lessons, subbed when needed, wrote parent emails (with supervision), created newsletters, dealt with all those pesky things like attendance and BBs. Classroom management has almost solely been my job. Do I feel ready? No, but I don't think student teaching would get me there any better either. I haven't gone to teacher dept meetings or dealt with IEPs. I have graded papers and helped write report card comments.

    I think a lot depends on how much you did as a TA and how many questions you asked. On the flip side, student teaching can't hurt.
     
  10. SmartCookie

    SmartCookie Comrade

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    Mar 31, 2008

    I skipped the whole TA thing. I felt it was the best thing for me and I don't really feel like I missed anything. I am really comfortable teaching.
     
  11. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    really? would you mind sharing more info?? I am working on reseach paper...teacher prep programs/alternate certificates/interships and mentoring for new teachers...what is best for teaching..

    I know that is a long title, but like I said..I'm working on it! :D

    without giving away too much personal stuff, can you tell me what school allowed you to do that?! did you just submit your transcripts to the state, and file under and alternate program???
     
  12. chemteach55

    chemteach55 Connoisseur

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    In Louisiana skipping student teaching is very common. In the school I teach in less than half of us have student taught. I am certified in all 7-12 sciences but I did not student teach and do not feel like I missed anything by not student teaching. I was in an alt cert program and scheduled to student teach and was actually hired at the school that I was supposed to student teach at. I accepted the job and had my own classroom right next door to the one that I was supposed to student teach in. After I taught unertified for 3 years, I was able to apply for certification.
     
  13. MrU82

    MrU82 Rookie

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    I HIGHLY recommend student teaching. There are pros and cons though.

    Pros:
    -You can kind of experiment and do what you want as far as methodology. You're a student teacher, if you F up...no big deal.
    -If you have a cool master/resident teacher then he/she can really help you out and can make networking a LOT easier.
    -The district I work in hires 98% of their student teachers but not nearly the same amount of interns. Interesting.

    Cons:
    - You dont get paid. LOL.
    - Sometimes your master teacher can be a total ego maniac or a witch.
    - Its kind of a gamble. Students will either respect you or NEVER respect you because you're known as the "STUDENT" teacher and therefore are not a "real" teacher.
     
  14. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    this is why intership is a better deal, and I wish they would offer it to everyone!

    you get the title of teacher (kids don't know the difference), and a stipend-not a full check but something! Plus reduced or paid college tuition. You have a mentor/cooperating teacher to shadow you the entire time 1-2 yr program, and they are actually supposed to help you...no witches or comedians allowed!!!

    you are in a program supported by the school and the college. support, finances, preparation and income... the top 4 reasons that make or break a new teacher!

    why not give this to all college of ed students??? schools are scared, you must meet rigid guidelines. colleges don't want to look bad sending wannabe teachers. uh, ok.. why not weed us out before we get to jr. or sr year?! Certainly after a few method classes and 100 clock hours of observation, somebody will admit that this is not for them.

    politely give them the boot.

    or drop them from the competion...like these goofy tv shows.

    for the rest of us, put us in the internship, pay us, and give us mentors. why make us struggle alone, although many will do well as some do, most will get mad and drop out!!!

    somehow, I gotta make this look pretty in a powerpoint presentation. thanks for the input everyone!!!


    statistics tell us the average new teacher leaves the profession or changes jobs within 5 years.....
     
  15. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    has this always been the case, or is it something new?? what about no child left behind??? certainly many states are forced to increase their teaching programs and standards because of this test-driven monster!
     
  16. katrinkakat

    katrinkakat Connoisseur

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    Actually in my district intern teachers are paid the same as regular teachers and receive the exact same benefits, move on the salary schedule at the same pace, etc.
     
  17. curious

    curious Companion

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    Holy cow! I'm in the wrong state. Here, teachers must be 'highly qualified' because of NCLB. While I can appreciate my student teaching experience, I feel it was far too lengthy a period to go without pay. Louisiana sounds like a dream for those in the teaching program.
     
  18. emmyblemmy

    emmyblemmy Companion

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    I completely agree! Not only are you missing out on amazing experiences, you are missing out on a key thing- having references worth their weight in gold to help you get a teaching job in these crazy markets. You need an edge, and a professional reference from a teacher who has worked with you is an incredible help. My references got me the job I have.
     
  19. Green_eyed_gal

    Green_eyed_gal Comrade

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    I can't imagine not going through the whole student teaching process.. Yes, it's tough going without pay, but I wouldn't have the classroom managment skills that I have now if I didn't student teach. I had a wonderufl student teaching experience!! :2up:
     
  20. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I believe that all college of ed programs should offer the following:

    1. Internship programs that pay you some income or at least pay tuition

    2. Mentor programs that give you somebody who cares, and will help!

    3. Follow up from the university (an alumni program that faithfully contacts and supports you). Sometimes getting an encouraging call may be all you need!
     
  21. mikaelab

    mikaelab Rookie

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    Definitely don't skip it. Your students deserve the absolute best teacher you can be. That means being the most prepared teacher you can be. The person who said they didn't have a good first year but didn't think they missed anything by not student teaching disproved their own theory. I did not have a horrible first year at all. You get an awesome mentor in your master teacher. This is not just someone down the hall you can ask questions to (as the person would be if you skipped student teaching), but this person would be someone you could watch, who would watch you the ENTIRE day and give you pointers. You would be able to make more of your mistakes during that learning period than struggling through your first year.

    I just think that with the high stakes our kids face these days, they deserve someone who is really prepared. Teaching small groups was wonderful experience I am sure as was subbing, etc., but there is no substitute for doing the job fully - you create the lessons, you deal with discipline, you establish a relationship as "teacher" with the kids, etc.

    Think about a doctor, for example. Would you want a surgeon who had never performed the surgery you needed? Maybe they had watched a little before, maybe even handed over a scalpel...but would you really want this person holding your future in their hands? As a patient, you would deserve a doctor who had gone through the process more thoroughly.
     
  22. iSaint

    iSaint Rookie

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    Ditto. When I introduced myself to the department head, she said 'good luck.' She's near retirement, and bitter.

    I went the alternate route, so I did not student teach. My first semester of teaching, I was taking three classes to complete the Masters. It was nuts!
     
  23. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I think all newbies should look into mentoring and induction programs. If your school doesn't have it, keep bugging somebody until you find one! If not, make a friend with another new teacher, and make a pact to hang out once a week, share notes, cry, and vent together!
     
  24. Catcherman22

    Catcherman22 Companion

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    I am doing an intern program as well, and we got a slight taste of student teaching before we enter our own classroom as we have to teach 5 lessons. I would NEVER do a university program.. because frankly.. I am not doing a lot of work and paying them for the pleasure of doing it. Thats just wrong in my opinion.
     
  25. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    I had to give the dreaded DIEBELS and ISELS Illinois snapshop of something something..for 1st grade as part of my observation hours. :( They didn't even want to know what we thought or how to help the kids! That was pure free labor to the school, and a bit of kissing up from the university!
     

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