anyone current teachers looking for a job

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by brandy, Jun 5, 2010.

  1. brandy

    brandy Rookie

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    Jun 5, 2010

    Are any of you looking for a new teaching job but already have a teaching job? For example, are some of you currently teaching in a district or private school but are trying to get a new job at a school/district that is a better fit for you? If so, what is the latest date in the summer that you would feel comfortable resigning from your current job in order to take a new job? I'm sure there must be teachers who leave their jobs over the summer because new jobs pop up duirng the summer and even in late summer--is this a common occurance?
    thanks
     
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  3. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Jun 5, 2010

    I've never been in the situation, but I think it could be a tricky one because in some cases you might be facing a fine from the school or lose your teacher license should you try to back out of your current job (especially if you signed a contract with that school).

    But let's say you haven't signed a contract yet--- then I believe its best to choose what is best for yourself. If you do come across a GREAT position that may even pay more, I would go for it. At the same time, you'd want to give as much time as possible for the school to find a replacement. You might be hurting yourself by taking the other position, especially if you would rely on the old school as a reference.

    Either way:
    -- If you signed a contract, be careful of getting out of the contract. My first contract said I would have to pay 1/3 my salary. Not sure about my new school.
    -- Give as much time as possible-- you don't want to be rude.
    -- Do not burn bridges-- you may want to use those teachers or the principal as a reference, so you'd want to live on a good note.
     
  4. roseteacher12

    roseteacher12 Habitué

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    I would find out exactly how your contract works; as bio mentioned some schools have different rules about contracts. I'm pretty sure the contract I am in now says you need to give 2 months notice and I;m not sure what you would have to do if you could only give less than 2 months.
     
  5. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Jun 5, 2010

    I know in TX, teachers have until 45 or 60 days from the start of school to turn in their resignations if they are not returning that year. We usually sign contracts in late March.
     
  6. brandy

    brandy Rookie

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    Jun 5, 2010

    this is what confuses me:
    if people talk about it not being a good idea to break a contract that you sign May or June then how do so many teaching positions become available in mid summer or even late summer. i know teachers retire over the summer, isn't that the same thing? I'm sure that if teaching positions become available in the summer then teachers must resign over the summer too, right? People move over the summer or people find jobs closer to home over the summer. right? people must quit over the summer or jobs would never open up unless enrollment increased, right?
     
  7. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    I teach in a military town, but I signed my contract knowing that I probably won't teach next year. We have orders, but do not have actually hard-copy orders yet. I don't want to give up my job until I am positive we are going to leave. I told my school I would let them know in August if I was leaving. So my school will most likely be hiring someone last minute. (I did talk to my principal and the assistant superintendent before I signed my contract.) Since I'm in a military town it happens a lot more often, so they're used to people leaving at the last minute.
     
  8. crcteach

    crcteach Rookie

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    Jun 5, 2010

    Sometimes positions come available due to numbers. An increase in enrollement.

    Though, I wanteda better job and resigned (I was teaching out of my cert) and it's been two years.......I'm still unemployed. That doesn't help, I know, but just be careful.
     
  9. mego65

    mego65 Comrade

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    Jun 5, 2010

    I'm in this position right now. I had to sign my contract at the beginning of May and I told both my Principal and head of HR that I was going to try to find something closer to home. They both told me to sign it, and hr told me I had to July 1 to resign.
     
  10. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Actually from what I remember, a lot of public school teachers retire mid-school year because of money reasons (new year, so its something with budgeting). But yes, probably most would retire at the end of the school year. I don't think that's where most of the mid-summer openings come from though-- those openings would start interviewing in March, April, May, or June. Like others have said, summer openings come mostly from budget changes or enrollment updates.

    I think a lot of teachers are staying put in a position if they're offered a contract--- its very hard out there (well heck its always hard but now its harder). I don't think I'd be comfortable quitting a position because of having to move, etc I would just stay put right now.
     
  11. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    And I think this is exactly what a smart teacher would do: ask first before signing anything. At least you know what the deadline would be. :thumb:
     
  12. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Jun 5, 2010

    In my district if you give less than 60 days notice they can hold you to your job. I have heard of people changing districts but having to teach the first two weeks before going over to their new school. Obviously some schools would decide to rescind their offer if you couldn't start until after the school year has started.

    I do also know that my district doesn't always hold you to that 60 days, they're just allowed to do it if they want to. I'm pretty sure that if in July I suddenly had to move across the country for some reason my superintendent wouldn't force me to stay.
     
  13. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    I work in a private school and we don't have contracts so I only have to give 2 weeks notice. I'm hoping to do that this summer if I can find a new job. Actually, I could give a day's notice and they couldn't do anything about it. They just wouldn't give me my accumulated sick pay.
     
  14. DHE

    DHE Connoisseur

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    Jun 5, 2010

    I think that it is 30 days in our district. After that you have to pay a "fine."
     

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