Any teachers breastfeeding a baby?

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by Alaskanteach, Aug 2, 2006.

  1. Alaskanteach

    Alaskanteach Cohort

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    Aug 2, 2006

    there are a few of us in my school. We have very little passing time and it is difficult to keep up. And I always have students looking for help at lunchtime..

    Anyone overcome these challenges?
     
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  3. MissAmy

    MissAmy Companion

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    I would definately get a motorized pump if possible. Hand pumps work.. they just take longer. Make sure you practice using it before you actually have to use it. I pumped the whole time I was student teaching and I just learned to eat quickly and use my breaks wisely. Come in earlier than usual if possible to get copying and such tasks done before school starts so you can use your breaks for you. I would make sure another teacher knows you are "out" so that if a small emergency arose someone would be able to handle it or if it was large be able to locate you. I hope this was the advice you were looking for .... :eek:
     
  4. Alaskanteach

    Alaskanteach Cohort

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    well I have a good pump. It is just that some states require by law that a business provide place/time for mothers to pump but somehow schools keep getting around that it seems..
     
  5. TeacherRW

    TeacherRW Cohort

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    I nursed both of my daughters. It was tough and more often than not, I was unable to pump during school hours. So, I left right after school to go relieve myself. I ended up pumping one side while my daughter nursed the other... my daycare provider held off her late feeding for me so that I could have a better letdown. My body started regulating to that schedule and it was just fine. My supply did not diminish at all.

    And, yes, I did find it interesting that there was no allowances made for me. I ended up pumping in the dark of my room, with the door locked, on the floor, and behind my desk. Otherwise it was the cold tile floor of one of the teachers' bathrooms.
     
  6. Mizz Lucy

    Mizz Lucy Guest

    Aug 2, 2006

    Do you commute?
    I pumped in the car to and from work.
    It was high quality & plugged into my lighter.
     
  7. collteach

    collteach Comrade

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    I ended up having to give my daughter formula for the time she was at daycare. I was not able to pump at school. I also could not pump at home and keep up the afternoon, nighttime and morning breastfeeding. Most of the time, she wouldn't even have more than 2 bottles of formula per day, especially because she was older when I returned to work (6 months) and was eating cereal.

    My school really lacked places to pump...that was one big problem for me. My principal offered to let me use the extra office next to hers. However, you could hear the pump out in the office and I could hear everyone talking and it just made me so uncomfortable that I was lucky to get a few ounces! Then the school psychologist offered up her office, which was at the far end of the school. My biggest problem with using her office was that I never had enough time! By the time I would get the key, get into the office, get situated, I had maybe 10 minutes to pump before I had to get the milk in the fridge, get the key back and get my kids. I tried to speak to our union rep about other possibilities, but considering he was an older, odd man, I didn't feel comfortable getting into detail with him.

    I had really wanted to give my daughter breastmilk exclusively until she was at least 1, but I am just very happy to know that I was able to breastfeed her for the majority of feedings.
     
  8. ad65shorty

    ad65shorty Companion

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    Aug 2, 2006

    I, too, supplemented with formula (1-2 feedings a day). My supply was always small anyway. I would feed my son before dropping him off at the baby-sitter's, then I would pump at recess (when I wasn't on duty). I, too, would pump in my room with the door locked. I put a sign over the window that said, "Mommy busy. Please do not disturb." I usually ate lunch while pumping in my room. And then, I'd do it again after school got out. It was a crazy time!!! My thoughts are with you! :)
     
  9. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    My school also lacked an appropriate pumping place, although I had abundant time. I teach 2 sessions of PreK, and I have 50 minutes between them. However, my classroom has a wall of windows that overlooks the playground, and there were 1st and 2nd graders out there during my break. One of the other walls was all windows and looked into the main hall of the school. Our staff has one bathroom for us all to share, and it wouldn't be fair for me to hog it for 15 minutes or more every day - not when the other teachers get only a 20 minute lunch break.

    I, too, ended up supplementing with formula at times. I was lucky enough to end up being able to take a 6 month maternity leave with each of my daughters (I have 3), and they got 6 months of uninterrupted breast milk. I also pumped and froze the milk while I was home so that the daycare provider could use it. So, while at daycare, my daughter would get two bottles, both before naps, and one was always breast milk, and one was sometimes formula. It helped that she was on some solid foods by that time, so she wasn's exactly starving...the daycare provider could always open up a jar if she ran out of milk.
    Kim
     
  10. theresabbeale

    theresabbeale New Member

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    Aug 2, 2006

    I had plenty of space but not a lot of time. I informed my students that I was available for the last 10 minutes but I used the first 20 minutes as a time to pump and eat. See if there is a lactation consultant in your community they can help they school make the necessary accommodations for the staff. :)
     
  11. mommaruthie

    mommaruthie Aficionado

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    I used to pump in my classroom bathroom. It had the most annoying fan for exhaust that came on when the light was turned on. I couldnt stand the noise so I would sit on the toilet with my pump on a chair in the DARKNESS! I was so stressed about the kids coming back from lunch and running out of time that my assistant would take them from the cafeteria to the outside hall way bathrooms!
    I would drive to school every morning: pump, eat breakfast, shmere makeup and drive all at the same time! Then on the way home I would pump because the baby would only need 'me/my breasts' for a bed time feeding. I was reliant on the pump in style by medella.

    Another school I was at, was ONLY a staff of women and i pumped AND ATE in the teacher lunch room which was only the width of a four top card table and a walk way! Basically, I had no modesty then but was able to pump and eat lunch....
     
  12. allisonbeth

    allisonbeth Comrade

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    Aug 2, 2006

    I nursed my son when I was teaching.

    Since I was a secondary teacher who shared a classroom I had to find a private place to pump. So, I was given a small storage room next to the nurse's office. I had a tough time pumping, though, due to the sounds of students getting their lunch meds and the pressure of knowing I only had a few minutes. It made me very stressed and I hated knowing I had to go sit in that room.

    So, after about a month I stopped pumping at school. My body naturally adjusted. I nursed my son multiple times at home (first thing in the morning, as soon as I got home from school, before dinner, before bed, middle of the night). During the day he got formula or pumped milk from the weekend. I successfully nursed him for over a year even with cutting out the daytime nursing.

    My friend/ coworker pumped for about 5 months. She had her lunch and planning period back-to-back ao she had time to relax, pump, and do her work. She pumped in the same storage area I used, but she wore headphones and listened to music/ read/ ate lunch. She brought in a glider-rocking chair and actually made a spot for herself in the room.She believed she was successful because she hated the idea of using formula. However, she was also a very laid back person who rarely let things get to her. I think staying calm/ not getting wound up about the day-to-day teaching helped her.

    It is tough to deal with the lack of time issue. I did not have to deal with students needing help during lunch because my lunch was right after theirs so they were in class. However, my friend was always reminding other teachers that her pumping time was non negotiable. Consulting , conferences,meetings etc would not be happening at that time. (The funny thing was that some of the women teachers gave her a hard time about her stance but the men never did!)

    I do have a warning, though, for anyone new to nursing and working. Have extra shirts, a blazer, and nursing pads in your classroom. You will have times that you leak. (And, it will always be on days that you cannot leave the classroom quickly to put in more nursing pads!)
     
  13. Alaskanteach

    Alaskanteach Cohort

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    totally agree...
     
  14. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    I think it is LOUSY that a profession with such a huge percentage of women of child-bearing age can make it so difficult to provide breastmilk for our children. For those of you with no place to pump, I would absolutely demand it. There has to be some place appropriate in a school building.

    I was fortunate in that my principal used to be a nursing and pumping mom. She would have cleared out of her office for me if that had been necessary. My classroom actually has a "coatroom" that was perfect and it is where I kept my pump and mini-fridge.

    As far as finding time to pump, I did it at lunch and was grateful for those 10 minutes I day devoted to my son. Sure, there were things I "needed" to be doing for work. But teaching is one of those jobs where you feel guilty if you don't work though your lunch break and I think that's ridiculous, too! If my centers weren't completely set up, or I had papers to mark, or notes to write to parents, etc., that all took second place. Pumping was my priority.

    I have wonderful teammates and a great assistant who would cover for me, or even take my whole class into their classroom if I needed the time to pump (like on those field trip days).

    (BTW, alaskanteach, I'm trini from MDC)
     
  15. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Aug 10, 2006

     
  16. Esperanza

    Esperanza Rookie

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    This has been an extremely helpful thread. My principal was a total jerk about finding me a place to pump, and I ended up extending my maternity leave. I want to go back to teaching but I do want to nurse when I have another baby, and I took the classes that the hospital offered but people in other industries don't seem to understand the unique schedule of a teacher. Thanks for sharing your stories with me, I am glad that women are standing up for their rights to feed their children in the most wonderful way possible.
     
  17. forbiddenpluto

    forbiddenpluto Companion

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    Aug 25, 2006

    Depending on the state there's actual laws about providing a place for you to pump.

    Before I was a teacher I worked from a MAJOR theme park and I went above their heads and got a note from Lorelai's ped saying that I HAD to have X amount of time, X times a day in a private room with a lock. They had to go by it because they didn't want to risk me suing them by refusing to go by doctors orders. :)

    Try doing that route and seeing if there's a spare para around to watch your class for 15-20 minutes a few times a day.

    Also you can try getting a high quality pump. If you have a dual electric pump there's bras you can buy (or even make) to make things hands free so you can do other work as well.

    Don't forget to stop and relax. Relaxation is SO key to good milk production.

    If you need anything else feel free to PM me!!!

    OH yeah, and don't forget to contact your local Le Leche League. :)
     
  18. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    I start school on Thursday of this week and have been trying to get enough of a supply for my daughter when I go back. It's not working as well as I would like but the person that will be watching her is a parent volunteer at our school and spends most of the time at school so I may be able to feed her while she is there if the supply is too low. However, she may stay at home more since she will be having an infant to watch. We'll see. If it doesn't work, then I will supplement with formula until I can get a big enough supply of breast milk.
     
  19. Esperanza

    Esperanza Rookie

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    How old is your daughter? I am trying to figure out how much I will need... my daughter is 9 months so she eats solids too. I am trying to figure out how much I will need!
     
  20. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    My daughter is only 2 1/2 months old, almost 3. Since I have been breastfeeding all summer, I'm not really sure how many ounces she eats at a time. When my other daughter was 9 months old, she of course ate baby food so she didn't need as much milk. I sent her with two bottles of milk and a small one of juice each day, just in case. I usually came home with a bottle of milk and sometimes juice, depending on what time I picked her up.
     
  21. forbiddenpluto

    forbiddenpluto Companion

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    You all might want to try looking over at kellymom.com :) It's a wealth of info!
     
  22. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Aug 28, 2006

    http://www.fourfriends.com/cgi-bin/milk.pl?lbs=7&oz=9&feed=10&formula=

    Try this site as well...it's milk calculator.

    I know how you ladies feel...I would pump like crazy on weekends as well because your milk will last up to 5 days some sites say 7, but I did the 5 days. I would also say pump one side if she/he nurses on one that way you're also building up your supply.

    You may want to contact your lactation consultant at the hospital...I know ours came to our room almost everyday& gave us the number to call with questions...I did!! VERY helpful ladies.

    If you need other advice...pm me as well!!!
     

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