Any news on how you are opening?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mr.history, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. CaliforniaRPCV

    CaliforniaRPCV Companion

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    Jun 28, 2020

    Yes, details matter. And those vary by the individual. If you are making a broad policy, what is going to cover the depth and breadth of all those individuals in the class, school, district, city, state and all the variety of work and living conditions therin?
     
  2. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    How will teachers get a lunch break?
     
  3. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jun 28, 2020

    That won't even be considered, Ms. Holyoke -- as usual for teachers. "Eat with the students!" they'll say, not realizing that supervising a classroom of students at lunch is completely incompatible with actually eating your own lunch (especially in elementary ed.)

    With no specials, when will elementary ed teachers have planning? Even if a schedule is worked out for the teachers to leave the classroom, and other certified teachers take over for a short period (don't hold your breath on that one) -- where will the elementary ed teachers go to do their planning? If they take their laptops with them (which are typically hooked up to the projector) how will the other teacher work?

    Then comes the whole concept of cleaning. I've worked in elementary schools for 20 years, and in that time I've never had a custodian actually wipe off student desks daily. I've never had custodians wipe down chairs and light switches daily. They typically, sweep, empty trash, clean the bathroom, and if there is a horrible spill, they may clean that up. I'm not knocking them -- they only have a certain amount of time to do their job and a huge school to deal with. Is the school suddenly going to hire more qualified custodians? At the schools I've worked at, the custodians come in the late afternoon/early evening to do this, with maybe one custodian working the school hours, incase of vomit spills, etc. There are two or three lunch room aids who help with washing tables and replacing trash bags. Who will be doing all this extra cleaning? We all know who -- probably the elementary ed teachers. And we all know the gloves will run out and be on back order, and the cleaning products are required to be mixed with water, and that means having special containers for it, that won't be available when needed. After the first couple of weeks, it will all end up being the teacher's responsibility.

    There is no easy answer to this issue. Parents want (and need) for their children to be back in school or in some kind of daycare situation so they can return to work and provide for their families. I get that. It doesn't mean it is safe for that to happen.

    I can already anticipate what is going to happen. Schools will reopen full time in elementary, and the teachers and helpers will drop like flies! Of course, teachers have very limited sick leave, and there will be huge pressure for them to return as soon as possible. And the cycle will continue because children, while not as affected by the virus, are carriers, and children, by definition, do not think with the presence of mind that adults have, and will take off masks (if they are even required,) will be sent to school even if there is a case at home, because parents need to work (just like what currently happens at school with flus, colds, and strep,) and children will constantly "forget' to do social distancing.

    The older teacher will be the most affected, along with those with pre-existing medical issues (and there are many, many teachers in both categories.)

    And in the end, the parents, the community, and the media will all act shocked -- who would have guess this could happen? And we'll all feel so sad when our favorite (older) teachers pass away from complications, why somebody will even write a children's book about it that the rest can read to their students, as we help them through the grieving process.

    And as always, this will again demonstrate the "value" people place on teaching professionals and staff. They are expendable for the common good.
     
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  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jun 28, 2020

    I know that I work in a "good" district. Our school board and admin do a lot of things - but not all things - right. What you've described just won't happen here. We may have lunch in the classroom, but our principal has already indicated that the same staff who typically supervise lunch and recess in the cafeteria would be assigned to individual classrooms to supervise, relieving the classroom teacher for his or her duty-free lunch. If specials occur, specials teachers would come to the classroom (think art-on-a-cart style). All specials teachers have their own laptops and wouldn't need the classroom teacher to leave his or hers. The teacher would still get a plan period. It may be in the form of a shortened instructional day if specials don't take place, or it could be teach four days per week and get one full day of planning/prep/meeting time (virtual meetings, of course). Where eating lunch and planning would take place is TBD, since teachers would not be allowed to gather in large groups in the teacher workroom or staff lounge. Our custodians already wipe off tables and other surfaces daily in the primary grades (although less often in the older grades), and we have a relatively large and hardworking custodial staff (when everyone is healthy and present, of course). The sick leave policy remains a question, but our admin have acknowledged that greater flexibility may be needed this year. They are aware that many teachers often come to work sick, and they have acknowledged that this won't be acceptable for the coming year. The possibility of having permanent building subs has been mentioned.

    I know that there are bad schools and admin out there (I've worked at at least one of them), but it certainly won't be this bad everywhere.
     
  5. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Jun 29, 2020

    I totally understand this! I just mean that by opening up schools it is not going to be the same. I am sad that there won't be dances and sports... that is part of school. By opening up and things are so dramatically different, it may stress our kids out even more. My daughter will be fine without all the fluff... I am just sad that she won't get to experience that fluff.

    Also, If we get COVID 19 at work would it be considered workmen's compensation? Do you think we are going to have to sign a waiver to go back to work?
     
  6. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Teachers have already gotten COVID-19 this month where summer school is opened. They have had to sign a waiver that it is treated the same as if you get the flu. You go home and it counts the same as if you are sick. No workmen's compensation. That is not a state law here, so each district, school, or state might be different.
     
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    Louisiana is trying to pass a law absolving schools of all liability for the spread of Covid-19.
     
  8. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Wow...I am hoping that my union will fight for us. We should not have to sign waivers.

    Unions should fight for distance learning until a vaccine AND a comprehensive stimulus package for families with school aged children.
     
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  9. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Update...public schools in Arizona have just delayed their restart almost 2 weeks to August 17.
     
  10. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Jun 30, 2020

    Unfortunately some states, such as Georgia, have a very poor union. I mean, there is no collective bargaining and there is very little the union does to support teachers unless your being unfairly terminated.
     
  11. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Jun 30, 2020

    Received another update from school. It wasn't saying anything specific, but kept going on and on about our plans for the next school year, which sounds like geared towards open up face to face. It also kept talking about all the cleaning and disinfecting measures that have been and will be taking place so I am assuming we are opening up as face to face.
    We are independent study, so it's doable with mild modifications, but we also have classes, and I assume those will be switched to independent study. I was teaching 4 ELD classes a week, and the email described a new curriculum and it sounds like every teacher will be responsible implementing it to their own students, so I am planning on going back as regular.
    We are supposed to know more next week or so.
     
  12. OhioTeacher216

    OhioTeacher216 Rookie

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    Jun 30, 2020

    My personal district has not released what they are expecting to do, however, these are the guidelines from a district about thirty-five minutes from me:

    A set of recommendations from a group of administrators, teachers, and parents was given to the school board on Monday night.

    Preschool & Kindergarten:
    • Students in preschool through second grade would come to school every day. Even though class sizes would be cut in half in order to abide by social distancing guidelines.
    Grades three through eight:
    • Grades three through eight would come into school two days a week and do remote learning the other three.
    High School:
    • High schoolers would do most of their lessons online, and would only come in for school work that includes labs or projects.
    Students with disabilities would come in every day.


    _________________________________________________________________________

    Other districts have already begun by not beginning the school year til after Labor Day and deciding the kids will go in groups, each group going in two days with Wednesday designated for cleaning.
     
  13. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    We have delayed student start date a week to August 12, which is a week later than originally scheduled. Teachers begin August 3rd.
     
  14. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    Jul 1, 2020

  15. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    I agree. Too many questions still unanswered about how this will look. How can high school kids stay in the same room all day while the teacher changes classes? Really? There are kids of different grade levels in those classes together. That teacher might not even be teaching to all those other kids!
     
  16. whizkid

    whizkid Groupie

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    Jul 1, 2020

    Our start date has been pushed back. This will probably go on all of July.
     

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