Any news on how you are opening?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mr.history, Jun 25, 2020.

  1. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    Have your districts started to discuss how next school year will look? My district has not, but the surrounding ones are. The most popular plans seem to be to have students rotate Monday/Wednesday and Tuesday/Thursday and then digital on Friday. I have seen other schools do 2 days one group 3 for the others and then rotate the following week.

    I'm nervous. I'm rewriting curriculum for the beginning of the year to focus on digital assignments. I don't see us collecting papers from kids if we are doing this.
     
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  3. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    We are also doing the hybrid model.

    Each grade level is divided into two pods. Pod 1 comes to the building on Mondays and Tuesdays. Pod 2 comes on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Everyone is home in Fridays.

    The kids will travel together to the same group of four core teachers and one specials class. We will eat lunch in the classrooms. No student lockers. No hanging out in the hallways between classes.

    We were 1:1 last year, and I had regular access to laptops in previous years, so the majority of my materials are already digital. I still have my weekly grammar and writing to get online. Those were about the only papers I used last year. These kids won’t have had devices, so I’m nervous about getting them all set up and going.
     
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    My district is purposefully not making a decision until late July because they don't want to have to go back on what they said. That said, at this point I am expecting to go back 100% in person. Many districts around here have recently announced that elementary will go back 100%. All of the metro area superintendents are working together, so even though my district has not announced, that must be the plan for right now as well. Numbers in my state look very good (at least for now- we know that could change). Honestly I think the numbers would have to be beyond dire for school to either be hybrid or online next year. It frankly comes down to parents needing the childcare- no school=parents not back to work= no fully functioning economy.

    Schools will all be offering a fully online option for parents who aren't comfortable sending their kids. I also think there may be short periods where individual schools switch to online because of an outbreak connected to that school, but definitely not the months long thing we saw this spring.
     
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  5. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Our district has not yet. I think they are waiting until July. But we start school August 3! They did just send a survey to teachers and parent with full time, hybrid, and withdrawal from school. I’m easer to know what’s going to happen. My cousin teaches in Texas and her district bought all the teachers the plastic face shields so they don’t have to wear mask.
     
  6. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    My district has a large team with a lot of voices working on a plan right now, and a survey was sent out to all staff and families last week. They are waiting until mid-July to announce the plan.
     
  7. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I'm working on the Virginia governor's re-opening work group, so this is an area I could spend all day talking about. My specific district is planning on offering two approaches; one for families opting for complete virtual, and the other hybrid with two days in-person plus a third half day for selected students based on intervention needs.
     
  8. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    We are supposed to hear by next week...
     
  9. ChildWhisperer

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    This is what our district is doing as well.
    Parents are also getting the option to keep their kids home and do 100% virtual learning.
    The days are also about 2 hours shorter (slightly longer than a half day) and I assume those 2 hours will be for disinfecting and teacher prep (since they won't be having any specials classes. Not sure what those teachers will be doing .. o_O Hopefully they'll still be working in some capacity & keep their jobs!)
     
  10. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    It's totally up in the air. 3 weeks ago my P said it would most likely be distant learning, as it's easier to start that way, then go back to the regular way, than the other way around.
    However we just got an email from the superintendent (last week), not saying anything specific, just showing off all the disinfectent and hand sanitizers they purchased for the schools for "when we open"
    The state of California started its reopening a couple of weeks ago (restaurants; gyms opened this past Monday, etc) and now there have been a surge of new cases. Of course.
    So the governor now ordered everyone to wear masks in public. It's kinda silly, for example when I go to the gym, I have to wear it, but as soon as I checked in with my card, I can take it off. Same thing with Zumba classes and restaurants. I know it makes no difference, so this many people out and about will cause the cases to grow.
    So now they're talking about maybe going back to closing some things (very carefully), for example Disneyland postponed the opening and the local water par will not open at all this summer.
    So I'm thinking because of this the schools will also rethink any opening plans. Who knows, it could be worse by the end of July and we're doing distant learning or it might go down and we'll open the regular way (I'm sure with some modifications)
    The local colleges and universities already announced months ago that all classes will be online.

    So it's very early to tell and no one seems to know anything.
     
  11. CaliforniaRPCV

    CaliforniaRPCV Companion

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    Another recommendation for kids to go back to school:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2020/06/24/yes-kids-should-be-going-back-school-fall/

    Mostly on the grounds that kids are safer and better cared for at school than at home:

    "Finally, lockdowns put children at greater risk of abuse, neglect, exploitation and violence. Full stop."

    And anyway:

    "On children, a study in Switzerland confirms what we have known for some time: School-age kids have extremely low infection fatality rates. Of the thousands of children found to have been infected, not a single one died. "

    Which is not true in the US, outside that study. The data is being cherry picked. And the teachers, and the families at home?

    What does it say that home is a danger to kids? That's a sad situation. It also says to me that education is a small part of the purpose of schools. So stop pretending. Bump up the non-educational services accordingly, with adequate materials and trained personnel for those services. Then the educational services could be more effective for education.
     
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  12. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    True, but what about the 92 teachers, principal, and staff members who died of COVID-19 in New York City when schools decided to stay open an extra week in March before closing down? We have pre-schools that opened up in Arizona this last month and teachers have already been infected. Yes, child abuse is something that must be considered. Also, the fact that children's teachers can (and have) died need to be considered. The one thing that I have found children have the most difficult time getting over is when a parent or grandparent dies. Imagine the pain if the child feels like they may have brought the disease to that parent or grandparent.
     
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  13. RainStorm

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    The infection rates for children seem to be quite low (if the information we are being given is accurate,) but I foresee that the schools that re-open fulltime will find that their teachers and staff are the ones getting covid-19.

    In my neck of the woods (Florida) we have insanely high infection rates right now (and I honestly believe it is being grossly under-reported.) The the school districts are all saying that we must re-open the elementary schools full-time so parents can return to work. I totally understand the need, I don't argue with that at all. But I'm also sadly aware that as they do this, elementary school teachers and aides will be dropping like flies -- and even if the illness is not serious, between the recovery and the quarantine period, who exactly will be teaching the class? (Maybe the now displaced specials teachers?) And then what will happen when the replacement teachers get it too, and they have to be out for quarantine?

    I also think the added work load of having to teach in person, provide everything digitally for students whose parents want to keep them home, keeping in contact with homebound students, extra monitoring or complete removal of shared items (like reading books, puzzles, work stations, centers, etc.) extra duties for cleaning and sanitizing, and the lack of breaks (because if the kids eat in the classroom and don't have specials, we all know that means less breaks and less planning time for elementary teachers) will take its toll. You can't burn the candle at both ends indefinitely, and let's be real, teachers were already doing this before the whole covid-19 situation.

    I totally get that this is a no-win situation. Parents are demanding full-time school for elementary school students, because they can't leave them home alone, they can't give up their jobs to stay home with them, and day-cares would be too overcrowded to meet state requirements and simply wouldn't be available to them. I totally get the parent's need for this. And most teachers are parents as well. Where will their kids be if a hybrid model is used or a stay-at-home model?

    They also just announced on the news that children riding schools buses here will be "limited" to TWO per seat, and must wear masks. They will not be skipping seats, but I guess they think 2 per seat (which is really supposed to be the bus's maximum capacity) will have to do -- two per seat is not social distancing! The kids sharing seats will be physically touching each other. They know the public schools can't do any better than that, because they simply don't have the needed vehicles, drivers, parking areas, etc.

    (Note: I am only addressing elementary school with this -- I know many localities are planning to try hybrid for the older age groups.)
     
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  14. CaliforniaRPCV

    CaliforniaRPCV Companion

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    Is that what you meant to say? The article I linked to says "extremely low infection fatality rates", which means to me that younger children get infected, but don't die very often. Which doesn't keep parents, grandparents and teachers from being infected (with fatal results).
     
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  15. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    You are correct. The article is correct in saying the infection-fatality rate is low. 0-17 year olds haven't died as often, although it has happened. Yesterday it was on the news that a 17 year old girl died of COVID-19. They are still just as able to pass it on to parents and grandparents though.
     
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  16. RainStorm

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    I wasn't referring to the article. I was just saying that we are being told by the media and our governors that children aren't getting covid-19 at the same rate as adults. I think I was unclear in what I was saying...I was being flippant about the reports that say "kids are fine -- they aren't at risk." I personally believe that any death is one too many.
     
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  17. CaliforniaRPCV

    CaliforniaRPCV Companion

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    Reporting isn't that great about infection vs disease. Part of that may be overall lack of understanding of the virus and the disease. My understanding is that there is being infected with the coronavirus, subsequently able to infect others, and actually having the disease caused by the virus, covid-19. It seems to me it may be possible for a 0-17 year old to be infected and communicate it to others without actually being sick with covid-19. I'm not clear. I'm not certain that anybody, including the experts, are clear at this point in time. And the confusing and contradictory reporting isn't exactly confidence inspiring.
     
  18. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Ok, my district just announced how they are reopening. Now I am in Georgia so we just do stuff. We are going back face to face. Kids are encouraged to wear a mask but are not required. There will be no rugs in the classrooms. Custodians will clean the rooms daily. Lunch will be in the cafeteria.
    Parents do have the option to do digital learning which will be more rigorous than in March but if they opt to do that, they have to do a full semester.
    Interesting!
     
  19. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

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    My district is waiting until mid-July when KSDE finishes its board meeting about how to handle reopening schools. We were told there are 3 possible options - all students back, some students back/some online, and all online. Personally I'm hoping for a hybrid model, especially since I just found out I'll likely have a large class instead of the small max-of-18 class I was promised last year.
     
  20. bella84

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    Did your custodians not clean rooms daily prior to this? Or do mean that they will be doing additional daily cleaning, on top of the norm?

    What is the reasoning behind lunch in the cafeteria? That sounds so risky to me.

    Did they say anything in regards to masks for staff?
     
  21. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Our custodians usually vacuum the floors daily, empty any trash bins that are put outside the classroom door, and refill the soap and paper towels daily. There are more thorough cleaning steps taken, but they are not done daily.
     
  22. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Comrade

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    Schools need to reopen. The kids that are being hurt the worst from being home are those most at risk. The biggest issues, at least in my district, was kids not having access to internet, not having a device, having a broken device, sharing a device, or no one at home to do the babysitting duties. Those are not going to suddenly go away in 2 months. The kids that are having the troubles are the ones that need what the classroom can offer--access and stability. The digital learning was pitiful. I give all teachers a lot of credit for making an effort, but I can tell you, my kid learned nothing. If he didn't have me, he would have failed Geometry and Latin. And guess what, they would have moved him forward, regardless, because in March, he was passing both classes. I had students who did absolutely nothing from March 13 - the end, and they are getting an incomplete. However, our district has said if they don't complete the work by the end of the summer, they will revert back to their semester grade. Most of those students were passing with a D at the semester. So, they will do nothing, pass, and move forward, but will not know the material.

    If schools are half and half, digital and face-to-face, what happens when the at home work isnt done? Do you spend the next in-person day doing it? Do you take the kids who did it and separate them from the ones who didn't? Do we have substitutes monitor online learning? But what happens when the regular teachers do need subs? Who monitors the online learning?

    What about senior athletes who need scholarships, but won't be able to play? And then, can't get the scholarships?

    What about those kids who need those non-core courses - art, music, theatre, building trades, engineering? Some kids come to school for those classes--if those classes are made virtual, I'm sorry, it's not the same. Can I teach costume design online (I'm a theatre teacher)? Of course, but how can I get a kid materials to do it? How can I have them do a fitting virtually?

    I understand that concerns, and the fears. However, we, as a country, need to return to business. Essential stuff needs to come back! School is essential.
     
  23. MissCeliaB

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    You say that school is essential, but provide examples that are nonessential.
    I would argue that while education is essential, physical school buildings packed with kids are not essential for education to happen. School districts (hopefully) have been working since we got sent home in March to put better systems in place for distance learning. If they have not, that is their own fault and not that of the teachers and students, who should not be put at risk because of their inadequacy. Teachers have had since we got sent home in March to work out better systems for providing distance instruction. If they have not, then that is their own fault, and they will struggle next year compared their cohorts who put in the effort and work.

    You mentioned athletes. Sports are not essential. Even if there is school, I am doubtful that there will be sports. You mention arts, music, etc. Whole college systems have scrapped their band and theater programs for next school year. I can't imagine that high schools will not do the same. I hate to say it, but even if there is school, there will not be choir, or band, or theater. Art will be extremely limited as students cannot share materials. Please stop pretending that we can just go back to school like normal, because that cannot happen.
     
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  24. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    They did clean the room everyday but I think it will be more in depth. I am sure we will be required to Clorox wipe desk down everyday. Which I did have a student do this at the end of the day. I think I will take it on to be sure it is super clean.

    I am not sure about the lunch room but my guess is that at high schools they do not know what to do with all of the students. At my daughter's HS lunch is a class period. So they can't really "eat in the classroom" because another class is in the room. So I am guessing the high schools are driving that decision.

    The only mention of mask was that it is HIGHLY recommend. So, I don't think they want to say it is required.

    After they announced this, they had so many questions that I am sure more details will be coming forward.
     
  25. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    I would further argue that school isn't truly essential. Yes, it's highly important and necessary for the long-term. However, in the case of a short term world-wide pandemic, school just isn't essential, whether it's in person or virtual. A semester or year out of school will certainly lead to disappointment, learning gaps, and social emotional issues. But almost no one will lose their life because school isn't taking place. And over the course of the average lifespan, this one year is just a blip on the radar. We're all eager to get back to our usual lives (or most of us are, it seems), but the definition of "essential" doesn't change just because we want it to mean something different than it does. Keeping people alive and safe is essential in the short term. Providing education is only essential in the long term. It's anticipated that a vaccine will be available by next January, with widespread availability before next June. That's short term.
     
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  26. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Comrade

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    "School districts (hopefully) have been working since we got sent home in March to put better systems in place for distance learning."

    I will agree on this point to an extent, but what about the schools that can't afford devices or hot spots? Budgets are being cut everywhere due to a lowered tax base, teachers are being RIF'd to save money. In reality, the problems are still going to be there. Digital learning, no matter how good, does not work for a lot of children. What do we do for them?

    "You mentioned athletes. Sports are not essential."

    I disagree. For the kids who only go to class because they have to keep their grades up so they can play sports, sports is essential. If their incentive is gone, so will their motivation.

    "You mention arts, music, etc. I hate to say it, but even if there is school, there will not be choir, or band, or theater."

    And that is sad. We spent the late 80s and 90s cutting arta programs, and schools have realized the consequences. Art, in any form, is an escape, a therapy, for many kids. Over my years as a theatre teacher, I have had 2 students who have told me that if it wasn't for wanting to do the next play, they would have killed themselves. And that doesn't even account for all the kids who just don't fit into school any other way. And those kinds of kids will be even more isolated and anxious if they have to remain away from school.

    "Please stop pretending that we can just go back to school like normal, because that cannot happen."

    I know it won't be normal, but the world needs to move past this. And in terms of vaccines, how many children will get them.
     
    Last edited: Jun 27, 2020
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  27. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Our big city district just announced yesterday that they will be going back full time 100%. There will be an online only option that students can choose if parents don't want them to go back. Two other large districts made similar announcements as well as a few smaller metro area districts. My district is still not releasing anything until mid-July but I can't imagine a scenario in which we would differ from everyone else. All of the metro area superintendents make these decisions together. I think my super is still just not wanting to say anything because she wants to see if things will change.

    They did change our calendar; students will be starting 2.5 weeks later and all of those extra days are basically now teacher work days. A few other districts have done the same. That makes me a bit nervous for what kind of changes they think are going to take 2.5 weeks to prepare for...

    They also added in two teacher work days within the first 2 weeks of school, so those first weeks won't be full weeks. The idea is to see what's working/not working and then have time without students to make changes. I think the mask issue is going to be HUGE deal either way they go. Many parents are claiming they will keep kids home if there is a mask requirement. Of course, actually doing that in practice is another story, but there are going to be very angry people on both sides whatever the districts end up doing. The big city district has said masks are required unless the student/staff member has a medical exemption, but we'll see how long that lasts.
     
  28. MntnHiker

    MntnHiker Rookie

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    We can't really just move past a pandemic though when people are still getting sick and dying. No matter how much we just suck it up and work hard, that won't outrun a virus. I'm not saying we can't do anything in-person, but it definitely should not be 100% "normal." And I think the absolute safest thing is to still be remote. I have a lot of concerns about the states not requiring face coverings for students. I am thankful that my state is. I'm also very concerned about the schools going back 100% in person with no concern about limiting class sizes and social distancing.

    What we know about this virus is that the "best" chance you have of catching it is close, sustained contact with an infected person. We know by studies done on people who got sick in the same office floor or restaurant that things like the AC unit pushing air around the room caused people even 6+ feet away from patient zero to get COVID. The same with people on a bus together for a period of time. To me, the least we can do is require face coverings based on these facts, and also seriously consider the safety of sending people back into enclosed spaces with a lot of other people (like a classroom) especially if it isn't well-ventilated and people are close together. The U.S. as a whole does not have this under control yet, as we are seeing in all the states spiking currently after starting to reopen. Yes, education is important and like someone pointed out, essential in the long run. But we are in the midst of a global pandemic. Our #1 priority needs to be keeping people safe and trying to not have so many people die. I know there are many other challenges that come from distance learning and not being in the classroom, but that doesn't mean we just say that since nothing is perfect, let's shove a bunch of people back together in classrooms. Or at least it shouldn't mean that.
     
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  29. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Exactly. Because of this many districts are giving parents a choice--virtual or attend school. I think that choice will need to be the case in each district or school.
     
  30. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    I don't understand your question, because I mentioned nothing about vaccines.

    Yes, it sucks that kids will miss sports, band, art, etc. I also teach communication electives, and I'm predicting my program will be cut a good deal. I know our district is expanding our training in trauma-informed educational practices, making sure students have access to social and emotional educational resources.
     
  31. bella84

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    I think that the vaccine part was directed at me. I mentioned vaccines in my response.

    I don't know how many children or adults will get the vaccine. I assume that a large number will and a large number won't. Even if the vaccine is only offered to adults, that puts us in a better place. Adults are dying at a much higher rate than children. So, even if children not being vaccinated still causes the virus to be passed around, at least the adults who are at higher risk of dying will have had the opportunity to make sure that they don't catch it.

    We can't just "move past this." It's science. No matter how much willpower we have, the virus will do what viruses do. People should not be forced to put themselves in danger simply because some other people are tired of having their lives disrupted.
     
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  32. bella84

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    Interesting... Around here, some schools have opted to start school a few weeks earlier than originally planned. The thinking is that they can reduce the time that students have been out of school and make sure they fit some school in before things get worse again in the winter.

    My district hasn't changed our start date, and we have the same number of PD/work days as usual. Nothing has been announced yet, but I wouldn't be surprised if our PD is all virtual this year, even if we go back to school in-person. My principal has already said that staff meetings will most likely be virtual throughout the year.
     
  33. Ima Teacher

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    Early start was one of the options we had, but we already start the first week of August. Early start wasn’t that beneficial for us.
     
  34. readingrules12

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    I am guessing you haven't been having your cell phone being filled with texts of stressed out teachers who are finding their children with COVID-19 this past week. I have and it has been stressful. I would not wish what we are experiencing in the Phoenix, Arizona area on anyone. The number of people who have died with COVID-19 more than doubled this past week In Arizona. How do we get past that we are running out of beds in our hospitals? Would you say that to those who had friends or family who died on 9-11? I really would appreciate you being more sensitive about what you say during this challenging time.
     
  35. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Jun 28, 2020

    What really makes me sad is my daughter will be a senior next year. I just know things will not be normal. There won’t be football or dances. They haven’t said this but this next year cannot just go back to how things were. In my little town when this all started everyone did their part. Now I’m one of a handful that still wear mask at the store. Georgia numbers are on the rise. It’s really scary. I’m not sure if people realize that going back to school for the sake of the children understand that school is not going to be the same.
     
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  36. tchr4vr

    tchr4vr Comrade

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    Jun 28, 2020

    No, I haven't. I am in a state that is keeping it's numbers low. Nor do I know anyone with COVID. And I will take that as a lucky break on my part. However, please do not speak to me of sensitivity, especially regarding 9/11. I was in NY on 9/11. I watched one of my students lose both a mother and a father at the same time. She became an orphan in front of my eyes. I spent three hours of my life thinking my husband was dead (he worked one block from the towers). We still do a media blackout in my house on 9/11 because the images still give my husband nightmares. I have an essay that i teach in my classroom that deals with Ground Zero--I barely get through class every year, but I do it because it's important for my students who were born after 9/11 to remember. Schools in NY were closed on the 12th, and some on the 13th. After that, we went back to work. Was it normal? Absolutely not! We acknowledged what had happened, discussed, cried, but we were there.

    And that young lady who lost both her parents? She was back in school two weeks later. It was very awkward, because no one really knew what to say to her. At the end of the school year, I asked her why she came back so soon--no one was expecting her to be back so soon. She told me because school was the only normal thing she had. '

    COVID is not like 9/11, and I do realize that. However, her sentiment is mine. And for the 1918 pandemic, which was much more deadly to children, schools were closed for 4 months. By the end of the month of July, we will be well beyond that.
     
  37. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jun 28, 2020

    You’re right. COVID-19 is not like 9/11. But you’re missing the point. The dangers of 9/11 were over in a day. The dangers of COVID-19 are ongoing. Although it is similar, COVID-19 also isn’t like the Spanish Flu of 1918. Just because something was done a certain way in history doesn’t mean that it should be done that way now. We have to rely on the newer technologies and knowledge that we have gained in the past century, and we’ve gained a lot. Again, the risks associated with this pandemic aren’t something we can just ignore because it would make life easier or more enjoyable for some. That’s a very selfish point of view to take.
     
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  38. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Jun 28, 2020

    I am sorry for the challenges that happened with 9/11 that you and your husband faced. That was a frightening time that I'll never forget. The excellent response to that we can learn from. We did ground all air travel for awhile after that. We did change how bags at the airport were screened. Much was done to slow down future terrorist attacks. We were safer due to not going on like "we have to get past this", but facing the facts that things changed on 9/11, and we need to as well. I sure didn't enjoy those baggage screenings at airports, but put up with them to keep myself and others safe for years to come.

    We need to look at the facts today that the virus is upon us and taking smart measures such as avoiding crowds, social distancing, and wearing masks can greatly decrease the future numbers who get the virus and who may die from it. These safety measures then can help to save lives, allow for those with pre-existing conditions to have hospital beds again, and to create a safe place for people to venture out to businesses again. I am glad where you live in is doing well. The Phoenix area had one of the lowest COVID rates for large cities in the country in mid-May. Then we reopened and we now have one of the largest rates of any city in the world. I hope people can learn from our mistakes. If not, I don't even want to think what August will look like.
     
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  39. FourSquare

    FourSquare Fanatic

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    Jun 28, 2020

    LOL @ worrying about sports and dances. Those are no good if you're, you know, dead. (Or your favorite teacher is dead. Or your grandma is dead.). I spent the second weekend of March at home for my dad's surprise 60th birthday party. My dad's long time boss was there chatting me up about my house, school, etc. Three weeks later he died on a ventilator from COVID.

    I'm for 100% lockdown until scientists figure this out. The world is opening up around me and I'm still huddled up in my house. You can do what you want, but your choices shouldn't put me in danger.
     
  40. CherryOak

    CherryOak Companion

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    Jun 28, 2020

    Here's the thing that complicates my take on it all - it seems as though a partial week could lead to students being exposed to multiple grades and multiple schools throughout the whole week due to the care being set up around here. Are we sure that's better for a community than close exposure to a full classroom - yet same kids all week? When I estimate galore and try to run numbers, it's a really interesting angle. Think about it - yea, this kid is only in a half populated class now and six feet apart, but X many classmates now go to full day care here and here on their off days. I genuinely question which is safer. ?
     
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  41. CaliforniaRPCV

    CaliforniaRPCV Companion

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    Jun 28, 2020

    That can be problematic. "We're open. Come to work or you're out a job." If you don't have an official policy backing you up, and you need that paycheck or unemployment benefits, you've got limited options.
     
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