Any Ideas ....

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by nhagle, Aug 14, 2008.

  1. nhagle

    nhagle Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2008

    Hi, I am a first year special education teacher. I will be working with 9 Emotional/Behavioral Impaired students in a middle school setting in which they are with me for the basics... English, Math, Science, and Social Studies and then they go home.(They are on a half a day program.) I will be teaching 2 6th graders, 4 7th graders, and 3 8th graders... My problem is they are all high functioning and I will be teaching them at their grade level so... When I am teaching English I will have to be teaching 3 different lessons at the same time and the same goes for Math, Science, and Social Studies. How can I do this and be productive with grade level lessons?


    My only idea.. is for example English I could have them almost in centers ....
    One grade could do the following
    Monday- Grammer
    Tuesday- Read Novel
    Wednesday- Comprehension on Novel and Book Group
    Thursday- writing... writing process
    Friday - will be a review/ catch-up day or an activity of the week for that subject

    Another grade could do:
    Monday- Read Novel
    Tuesday- Comprehension on Novel and Book Group
    Wednesday- Grammer
    Thursday- Writing
    Friday- Review/ Catch up

    And the last grade could do:
    Monday- Writing
    Tuesday Read Novel
    Wednesday- Comprehension on Novel and Book Group
    Thursday- Grammer
    Friday- Review/ Catch up


    Do you think this would work? Any other ideas?
     
  2.  
  3. rchlkay

    rchlkay Companion

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2006
    Messages:
    237
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2008

    Have you met the students you will be working with? While I think that the idea that you have with centers is nice, I just don't know if it will work. This age of kids is tough and you have to take into consideration that these kids have disabilities. My mentor teacher told me that you have to look at what you would expect a gen ed student to do and then look at what you would expect from a student several years younger. More than likely this is what you will get from your kids. I honestly can say that there is no way that I could ever do any kind of independent work centers on a regular basis and I only have a few of EBD kids. Learning to be flexible and teaching social skills is what you're going to need to do.
     
  4. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

    Joined:
    May 20, 2006
    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2008

    I found what I could that the students all had in common and with that there were many similar skills each student was learning.

    Rules, structure and working together. . .a good class room management program. . .should all help.

    It was elementary school and we found the students fell in a couple of different groups they we're taught that way.

    The older students or higher functioning could be a great way to scaffold and differentiate learning.

    I was in a k-4
     
  5. nhagle

    nhagle Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2008

    Maybe I did not explain myself the first time. I am told that I need to teach English, Math, Social Studies, and Science to my 9 students with Emotional Impairments... they are very high academic for example my 8th grade science(geoscience) that I will be teaching will give my students high school credit. I have not meet my students yet or read their IEP's since I was just hired on the 8th and waiting for the board to meet on the 18th for approval then I will be able to look at IEP's. However, I was told that my students are very able to do their grade level content. Plus, I was told I have to teach each student their grade level content by the states benchmarks and district benchmarks. The program that I am teaching in is designed to elimate times when the most behaviors happen for example passing time in the hallway and lunch. My students will not have any passing time in the hallway and they go home before lunch time for the day. How can I possibly teach to 6 grade benchmarks, 7th grade benchmarks, and 8th grade benchmarks without grouping them into groups and giving them independent work? I don't think it is possible. If anyone has any ideas how I can do groups or teach to all three grade level at the same time please let me know. I am just trying to figure out how I am suppose to do what was asked of me....... :unsure:
     
  6. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

    Joined:
    May 18, 2008
    Messages:
    1,042
    Likes Received:
    81

    Aug 14, 2008

    Oh, you're like me. I teach ED at the primary level. But I have them full days.

    We're doing centers for reading, writing, phonics. I'm stationing myself at the reading center to do one-on-one, while my aide "floats". I'm hoping to have folders for each student at each station with work at their level.

    We're going to try math and spelling whole-group. I figure my K level mathematics will be good review for my older kiddos. Of course at this age we're doing calendar time too.

    What state are you from? A lot of the standards in Ohio "overlap".
     
  7. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 14, 2008

    I would look into the standards pretty closely. It is definitely true that in most states, the standards "spiral" - thus making something that you'd be working on in sixth grade, something you'd see again in seventh grade, and something you'd expand upon in eighth grade (or something similar to that). Independent work stations (I would call them stations instead of centers, to use language that is appropriate for middle school) sound like they'd be a great idea. I had two ED kids in my cross-categorical class last year, and surprisingly enough they THRIVE when they are given the same/similar supports as students with autism (complete structure, visual supports, behavior rules, etc.) I would set your standards from the very first day and show your expectations. You should have some sort of token economy or behavior reward system so the students can "earn" rewards for completing their work. Having an extrinsic reward is a likely way to get them to comply and do what you're asking of them. Perhaps they may earn a ticket or token from each station, and they can trade in their tokens for free homework passes, mcdonalds certificates, "leisure time," etc.

    I think if you set up a system where they are motivated to complete their work, they will be more likely to be successful in the independent setting. An EBD class is a great place to work on independence - this is a skill that these students WILL need in their lifetime, why not start on it now!

    One of the "stations" can be where they meet up with you to review state standards/IEP goals/subject matter, etc. - Whatever the focus is that day.
     
  8. nhagle

    nhagle Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 16, 2008

    I have found out a better way that I am going to try for the time being then if needed to I could have them in stations....
    I will start each lesson as a whole group. Then if not possible to teach whole group I will group them by grade level… into three groups and myself and my paraprofessional can work with two of the three groups as one group works independently on a assignment or activity then we will switch up the activity or assignments so all three groups get their mini lesson.

    I did look at the Michigan benchmarks and a few benchmarks will be meshable and the others I will just have to my plan above.

    I think English will be the easiest of the four core areas to unite them since I can have everyone working on Grammar or Writing or we all can read a Novel together since I can start with a 6th grade leveled book and increase in difficulty since my plan is to read atleast 3 novels with them this year.

    Does this sound like it will work ? Does anyone have any better ideas? Let me know, Please! This disussion board always has great ideas to help out when needed. Thanks for all of the great ideas!!!! :)
     
  9. Teach96

    Teach96 Comrade

    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Messages:
    335
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 17, 2008

    Absolutely. Structure works with all students. I find that my Mod/sev students rely on the structure and consistency of our day. Even our typical Gen Ed peers need it and would benefit from their teachers using it more often.

    I also agree with using stations instead of centers as your terminology. :up:

    ________
    my blog...www.lifeskilllessons.com/blog
     
  10. teachersk

    teachersk Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2007
    Messages:
    1,872
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 17, 2008

    I even go as far as color coding my students and their work areas/work items. This helps with accountability - no one can have the wrong notebook, etc. It also helps with boundaries if you are working at a table... I place tape lines down the table so no one is able to get in anyone else's space. They really respect the tape, which is funny. Prior to implementing this - we had a lot of problems with students touching/poking/prodding/hitting one another. Their folders are color coded and have a box they belong in, etc. The free time shelf is totally marked with where things are supposed to be placed when they are finished, etc. The room was TOTAL structure zone (that's what my principal called it) and it alleviates SO many of the behaviors. There's not really any room for error - if you're following a visual schedule (even if the kids are high functioning and at the middle school level - a visual schedule might even just be a typed out checklist) -- they can CHOOSE not to follow it, but this is unlikely when you have the activities laid out appropriately (preferred activity to follow a less preferred activity, etc.) My kids have to ask permission to get out of their seats at all times. This is also very helpful in the "structured" aspect, because there are never any problems with students being in areas where they are not supposed to be - it just alleviates all of the opportunities that the kids MAY have to make poor choices or get in trouble. Some of the other teachers would laugh when they saw my little electrical tape boxes on the table, or the place on the desk that said "Pencil goes here" or the way the kids would raise their hands to ask permission to leave their seats.... But if you walked into my classroom during work time or any other part of the day, the kids are SO familiar with the routine, the structure, that there were very few opportunities for them to display challenging behaviors.
     
  11. nhagle

    nhagle Rookie

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    26
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 17, 2008

    Thanks Teachersk ! I agree with you on the structuring of the classroom, but I still have not seen my classroom or meet with my paraprofessional I will be working with and school starts in 2 weeks. Plus, I am trying to find a line of too childish and appropriate since they are middle schoolers, yet they need structure. I am sure my Assistance Princ. and my paraprofesional will help me in doing this thanks! I am still open for any suggestions that would help me teach all three grade levels at one time?
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 232 (members: 0, guests: 199, robots: 33)
test