any ideas?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by djmondi, Dec 14, 2005.

  1. djmondi

    djmondi Comrade

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    Dec 14, 2005

    First, I need to get some tape residue and crayons off desks in my classroom - does anyone know a product that requires little to no scrubbing in this process?

    Second, I have an "academically gifted" child in my classroom who does nothing. Other than giving him zeros for not completing his work, are there any consequences that might open his eyes? I had been sending work home to get it completed, but now he does less than he was at school so I don't want him to think he will do nothing all day, and do the work at home. When he meets with his "academically gifted" teacher during the week he is doing very little work for her also.
     
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  3. GlendaLL

    GlendaLL Aficionado

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    Dec 14, 2005

    Goo Gone is made to remove tape residue. It is a yellow-colored liquid. It's sold with other cleaners like Pine-sol and Lysol in stores such as Wal-Mart or K-Mart.
     
  4. iloverecess

    iloverecess Rookie

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    What about trying "beat the clock" ? My son used to have a terrible time completing math worksheets with more than 10 problems on them and his 1st grade teacher frequently assigned pages with 50 to 100 problems.

    My solution was to have him see how quickly he could do 10 problems and record his time along the edge of his paper. Then he'd do the next 10 and see if he could beat his best time. (If the student is not good at telling time then provide a stopwatch.)

    You can also work it the other way and set a time goal...how much can you do in 10 minutes and use a kitchen timer.

    It helped him to break the task up and kept him more motivated.
     
  5. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    How old is this kid? How do we know he's "academically gifted"? Is he getting exactly the same work as the other kids, or the same but more of it, or something different?
     
  6. 1stferg

    1stferg Comrade

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    Wow that sounds familiar. I would love to know how to deal with gifted kids too. Almost every gifted kid I have had has been like that. Lazy is the word that comes to mind. But also disconnected. If I tell them to put away a book, prepare for P.E., or anything like that then they appear to be totally disoriented and quite confused. It is like there is no common sense. I rarely refer first graders for gifted unless the parents request it. The kids who work hard and are high achievers usually have an average IQ. While the gifted kids require more guidance to complete even the simplest task.
     
  7. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sounds familiar to me too, but from the kid's point of view.

    What you see when you ask the gifted kid to put the book away probably IS disorientation, if the kid is anything like many gifted people I know: when we read a story, within a page or two we stop being aware of words on the page and we start being IN the story - seeing and hearing and feeling it, being there, in a place which is mentally very far away. It's a little bit like altered consciousness or a trance state, and it really does take a little while to come back to everyday reality. I know I've read like this at least since I was six years old, and probably earlier, and though I haven't studied it formally, the verbally gifted people I know whom I've asked overwhelmingly report similar experiences, even with books that aren't actually all that gripping.

    I should add that I don't try to do this; it just sort of happens. It used to infuriate my mother; looking back, I don't know whether it's because she didn't read that way and didn't understand it, or whether it's because she did read that way and didn't have enough opportunities to.

    Best bet may be to treat this as a special case of difficulty with transition; try giving the kid a friendly heads-up a few minutes before the transition is supposed to happen.
     
  8. 1stferg

    1stferg Comrade

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    Dec 15, 2005

    TeacherGroupie, Thanks for sharing. To tell the truth I really had not considered it from the child's point of view. That is something I should do. It is very hard not to expect more or higher quality from a gifted child. I am reminded that "academically gifted" is just another exceptionality of special education. And gifted children deserve to receive the same consideration for modifications as MI or LD children. As I mature as a teacher this is one area I continue to struggle with. But I am making progress in my effort to understand gifted-ism. Thanks for helping me!
     
  9. KellyDeyo

    KellyDeyo New Member

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    Idea for removing the tape and crayon :)

    Hello there,

    I was going through some of the forums and this one caught my eye.... I have a solution for you so that you can get the tape and the crayon off your desks and this is very cost effective and it works with no scrubbing!!!!

    Mr. Clean Magic Eraser's.......I tell you this is the way to go and for a box of them you pay as little as 4.00.....Usually coming three to a box.... They work wonderful on tons of things.....Just wet the sponge and your problems are as good as gone.... You can find these any where....

    I hope this helps please let me know if this solves your problems.... I am sure that it will.......I have used them on carpets and counters and etc. there hasn't been anything that I couldn't get out with them so far....
     
  10. cingy

    cingy Rookie

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    Dec 16, 2005

    Oh these gifted children to whom you all refer are not lazy...they are bored! please take some time to read Mel Levine's book called The Myth of Laziness. While he tends to talk about children who learn differently on the lower end of the spectrum, it also applies to gifted children. I have a gifted student in my class who I struggle on a daily basis to keep engaged. He is now a fourth grader (I had him last year also). Before beginning any new topic of study, I give pretests to all of my students. If there are students who already know the content (be it math, science...etc) I will not make them do what everyone else is doing. That is a waste of their time and that is why these kids tend to look lazy. Yes it is an incredible amount of work for me but so is designing lessons that meet the needs of my lowest children. In the content areas, I let this child, as well as another, explore topics within the unit of study in more depth. In addition, one of his previous teachers found a mentor who meets with the child once a wek. Finally, I have weekly conversations with this child to check in on how much "brain sweat" he has had to produce during the week. He also understands that there are some things that he just has to do even though they might not be what he wants to do; just like paying bills. Do I feel like I am meeting all of his needs? Heck no! But I do think that he is engaged in learning about 80 percent of the time and that is fairly good.

    Karen
     
  11. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I wouldn't go so far as to say that ALL of them are not lazy. But some of the ones who ARE lazy have learned to be that way because otherwise they get to do lots more of exactly what everyone else is doing, or they've learned that it annoys the teacher when they finish their work too fast, or they've learned that they'll get in trouble for not following directions if they try to do the work in a way that makes it more challenging to them.

    And the gifted kid who wants help with simple things may be lazy - or mayh just be testing to make sure that help WILL be available if it's needed. Gifted kids are often thought of as being able to learn on their own without any help and are often recruited to help other kids; while it's true that gifted kids can do a lot on their own, it's much better for them if they're confident that they can ask for and get help. It's better for their classmates, too: gives the classmates additional permission to get help, and it reduces the distance between the gifted kid and the rest of the class.

    We geeks don't MEAN to be difficult, really we don't...
     
  12. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Dec 16, 2005

    And I see a lot of quiet gifted kids who just sort of daydream in their own worlds. I think they are mentally self-stimulating and exploring. I had one 5th grader last year just like that. We worked ahead in math (he learned in 5 minutes what the others took two weeks to get) and I moved him up to my pre-algebra II class this year (8th grade curriculum). Now he's in the right place. He has been fun to observe.
     
  13. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Sometimes "mentally self-stimulating and exploring", sometimes just noodling while waiting for everyone else to get done with whatever. And sometimes when the elementary-school gifted kid is reluctant to share her thoughts, it's because she's discovered the hard way that it's socially okay to get excited about winning a game on the playground but when you're a third grader and you're jazzed about just how huge the universe is, people just don't get that.

    (Wait: "pre-algebra II"? Does that mean "second part of pre-algebra" or does it mean "prep for algebra II"?)
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2005
  14. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Second part of pre-algebra. Really. He totally gets it. There are 4 8th graders, 5 7th graders, and him.
     
  15. boogaboo214

    boogaboo214 Companion

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    i to have always understood that gifted kids get "lazy" when they are bored with what the class is doing. where i am from i have known gifted kids to skip a grade or two so that they can be academically competitive
     
  16. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    We try very hard not to do that. Social development is just as important as intellectual and they need to work it out with their own age peers.
     
  17. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    I didn't mean to suggest he doesn't get it, I was just trying to figure out just what the class was.
     
  18. 1stferg

    1stferg Comrade

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    Oh man, I think I was one of the first ones to mention the word "lazy'.(post #5) Can I clarify what I meant? I did not mean that gifted children are lethargic or unmotivated. Instead I meant that when I give an assignment to a gifted child and I have expectations that the assignment will stimulate thinking I want to see that happen. I want to see some effort put into the assignment. However, very often the gifted child will do the most miniscule amount of work hoping that will pass. Where some of my lower academic students will put much more effort and therefore learn much more from the assignment. I find that frustrating when considering the gifted child.

    I do not agree with the idea that gifted children are bored. Gifted children are self motivated and therefore never bored. They are able to entertain themselves in every situation. That is why sometimes if they are not identified and receiving services they can become a behavior problem in the classroom.

    Gifted-ism is a very deep and complicated condition. I am learning a lot here.
     
  19. SPED Teacher

    SPED Teacher Rookie

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    maybe the wrok your giving him is too easy? and because he knows it, hes not interested in completing it, try giving him more challenging work, and reinforce the first couple of times???
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Are his parents gifted? Does he have older siblings who are gifted? How were his needs being accommodated last year? (That would have been kindergarten, yes? I've lost track of the year.)
     
  21. alteacher84

    alteacher84 Companion

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    Hey, I know it's been a while since you posted this question but I haven't been on in a while and the post caught my eye. Just wanted to let all the teachers out there know that shaving cream (even the plain cheap walmart brand) takes permanent marker, paint, etc. off the desks/tables. I am not sure about tape residue and crayons but I would assume it would also take that off since it takes off stuff as tough as permanent marker...hope it helps in the future if you can't use it now...
    By the way, its also a fun way for the kids to clean their own desks off and then wipe it off with paper towels...less work for you!!!:)
    Amanda
     
  22. hescollin

    hescollin Fanatic

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    Put a gob of shaving cream on each students desk. Have them practice writing the spelling words in the shaving cream. Have plenty of paper towels handy. The desk will be clean, students had fun practicing spelling and your room smells so clean and nice.
     
  23. boogaboo214

    boogaboo214 Companion

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    I honestly do belive that gifted kids are bored. I have a friend that is gifted. he said in elementary school he felt like he should have been stupid just to fit in in his class. he explained it to me when we were in high school like " if i give you a work sheet of basic addition and expected you to get excited about doing it how would you feel?" when he got into middle and high school he had to try more but he was still an A student.
     
  24. Rosieo

    Rosieo Enthusiast

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    We always use shaving creme to clean our desks. It takes off everything, glue, crayons, markers and whatever gunk the kids get on their desks.
     

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