Another teacher leaving mid-year

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Pi-R-Squared, Jan 10, 2015.

  1. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    Jan 10, 2015

    We're about to lose a 2nd 6th grade teacher this year at the middle school. Having seen how the 1st teacher's departure impacted the kids, I can only imagine how they'll feel when the 2nd one leaves! The teacher leaving will be a huge loss as he's been there for over 15 years but he found a new opportunity that he applied for and got. I see this as a chance to develop some sort of leadership role as a veteran teacher leaves and the newer ones like myself stay. Plus, with the upcoming admin changes, I dunno what to expect. :D
     
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  3. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Jan 10, 2015

    Be careful at taking on too many responsibilities, especially when you've just started your career.

    The last thing you want is yet another thing on your plate. I would focus on building up my skills as an educator first, and then do extra things when I feel well-established.

    This many teachers leaving mid-year and the changes in admin make me also worry about the environment that you're teaching in.
     
  4. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Why are so many leaving mid-year?
     
  5. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    The first one found a similar position where she works so the commute went from 45 minutes to 5. The next one found a college position that pays about $12K more.
     
  6. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I'm surprised these teachers didn't wait until the end of the year, the end of their contract.
     
  7. daisycakes

    daisycakes Companion

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    I think that most teachers do not feel it is impossible to leave midyear. On this forum, most users advise others to never quit midyear. However, I believe there is overlap between the kind of teacher who would never consider leaving midyear and the kind of teacher who is so dedicated to teaching they spend a lot of time on a teaching forum.
     
  8. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    I believe we just need to give 5 days minimum notice. With that in mind, I do not understand what a contract means if a teacher can just up and leave just like that!
     
  9. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Yeah, I keep hearing that in some states or regions they could even yank your credential. I think a contract is there for teachers to know they have a job for the year, and for the school to know they can count on the teachers to be there for the year.
     
  10. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    But on the other hand, opportunities don't always wait till school is out. My college is currently hiring a position similar to mine, and needs it filled ASAP. Several teachers applied, and when asked, about half said they would leave mid year. The others withdrew their app.
     
  11. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    Well, I know the P is leaving in March. Then, word around has the superintendent retiring at the end of the year. I guess what I have to do now is what my P told me last year. That is, keep teaching and don't worry about it. :lol:
     
  12. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Connoisseur

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    I do live in a "right to work" state (Alabama) so could that make the contract not really a contract?
     
  13. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I don´t know. To me it seems the kids get the short end of the stick when a teacher leaves mid-year. I do understand that things happen, opportunities come up, but leaving mid-year does not seem the best time to leave. I teach 6-year-olds, and these kiddos can be very emotional. Many of them don´t handle change well. I can´t imagine them trying to emotionally handle that (or the parents, for that matter).
     
  14. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jan 11, 2015

    It happens all the time with maternity leaves. Kids are resilient. They often handle the change significantly better than the adults do.

    When I left my first teaching position mid-year, I worried about what it would do to the kids. I left anyway because I knew that I couldn't let my long-term career and health (stress level VERY high/toxic environment) be held up by my worries about what my leaving might do to one class of kids. I had to put myself first. I left a lot of my teaching materials that I wouldn't be needing in the new position for the new teacher to use in the classroom for the remainder of the year. I figured that, even if I left, the classroom didn't have to change all that much. When I went back to collect my items on the last day of school, it was clear that the students loved the teacher who had taken my place. My worries were for nothing! A short talk with my former principal at the time indicated to me that she felt like it all happened for a reason. There were even a couple of parents who appeared to have grown quite fond of the new teacher. So, moral of the story is that, while leaving mid-year can often seem like a horrible thing to do to students, it can often work out to be the best possible thing for everyone involved.
     

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