Another Daily 5 Question-I-PICK

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by VANewbie, Jun 28, 2011.

  1. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 28, 2011

    I am currently reading the Daily 5 book and many of you know I am trying to implement this in my class next year. I have done parts of Daily 5 with my class like read to self, writing, word work, read to partner but never had it really structured like the Sisters suggest.

    That being said I have also done lessons on choosing just right books. But I never gave the students a chance to pick these just right books. Each student has their own bin by their desk where I put their guided reading level books in there in which they read.

    My kids are 1st graders so how do you let the students pick books? Do they just pick books from your classroom library once a week a specific time you set out?

    How does this work?

    I know I let my students pick their own books at the beginning of the year but then they only wanted to read the books they picked (which were important) but I REALLY wanted them to read the books that were on their guided reading level. So I stopped having them pick.

    And here is another piece. If you do allow them do pick does it matter how your library is set up? Right now I only have labels-non fiction, fiction, animals, and specific titles like all clifford books etc.

    I know this was a long post. Sorry.;)
     
  2.  
  3. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Messages:
    1,884
    Likes Received:
    108

    Jun 28, 2011

    We good fit book shop about once per week...Tuesday for us as it just was soemthing to look forward to on a Tuesday. I let a child shop other times when they ask which rarely happens.

    One of the first individual CAFE conferences is going thru their totes and choices with the kids. It has not been much of a problem in my room just because I conference with them so often that I notice when some direction is needed.

    Yes, I have them keep guided reading books in their totes too. They have a slip of paper/bookmark that someone else must sign that they read to them. I have LOTS of people coming in to listen to kids read...parents, foster gradnparents, high school students, principal, guidance counselor, etc). These people may also read to the child if need be. They also help recognize books that don't fit.

    Once I let a boy keep a 'bad fit' Poke-mon book in his tote but not for reading, for writing. He used it TONS to help him spell and create his own stories.

    My classroom library isn't the best. I do have them sorted into Mercer Mayer, insects, jokes, Junie B, etc. But about 25% do not have a 'home.' These I divided into 9 boxes and pull out a new box the first of each month.

    Remember that the goal is to get kids reading for the love of reading. In order to do this, they do need to choose books of interest (just like you and I do). However, in order to learn to read these books, they need guided reading books from you as well. I tell the kids just that.

    Good luck!
     
  4. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 28, 2011

    This is great. I will keep this in mind. I still need to wrap my head around this.
     
  5. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 28, 2011

    I didn't have room for book bins, so I used gallon bags for their book choice, and yes, the guided readers went in the bag too.

    One of the things that helped the children find books that they liked was to have them chose the name for the bins. At the beginning of the year, the library area is closed. Starting with the second day of school ,I take out one unlabeled bin for each table, and the children may read from just that bin on their table. Then I switch the bins each day until each table has read from each bin. At the end of the week, we gather in a circle and decide on names for the bins, and they go on the shelf. The children can then choose books to keep in their desks, but only from those bins. We keep doing this until all of the bins are labeled.
    This was the first year that I did this, and my shelf was pretty organized all year.
    As for choosing the right books, some children really surprised me with their choices. One young lady, who I thought was below level, was choosing chapter books, and was able to read them to me during our conferences.
     
  6. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 28, 2011

    How do you have the students pick each week? Do you pass the bins out each week?
    Or do you give 3-4 kids a chance to go back and forth to the library to pick?
    It sounds so simple. Why can't I grasp this.
    :dizzy:

    I'm still trying to figure out the management part.
     
  7. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    I didn't use bins, I used gallon bags, so they could only have 5 books at a time. One of their morning jobs after breakfast was to change their books and read at their desks. If they didn't need to change their books, they just read...so "Read to Yourself" was covered before morning meeting.
    My morning job(work) list: Change your pencil, answer the morning message, change your books, and read. It took them about 15 minutes to do that. I had to encourage some children to leave the library area because they were chatting, but they were pretty good about that routine. I used the time to check attendance, homework, and clean up after breakfast, which was served in the room.

    The other teachers in the building used bins, and since they held more books, the children choose books on Monday mornings, and didn't change them during the week. They also chose them right after breakfast. You could make it their "bell work" in the morning.
     
  8. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    We had a very simple rule that they could only trade books when all their other books were read and we trade books at a teacher conference (well, right after one). Students then got books from me, I usually switched those at the conference and then could go to the library and pick 2 books to add to their basket.
     
  9. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Here is my plan-for now.

    Every Monday I will designate a time that students can trade books. I will send them by tables to go to the classroom library to pick books. I will give tables 5 min each.

    I have to teach them how to use the library, how to put things back and how to pick just right books.

    Sounds easy. I hope I am not missing anything.
     
  10. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    How to take care of the books
     
  11. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Yes I need to add that. I had problems with that this year.
     
  12. trayums

    trayums Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2005
    Messages:
    2,424
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Each day of the week I have a group of children pick new books during the morning routine. It works well. The kids know what bins to pick books from and I also have them use IPICK!
     
  13. km51571

    km51571 Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2008
    Messages:
    122
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    ALWAYS let them pick books for their bins--it keeps them "bought into" Daily 5. Putting their leveled books in there is fine as long as you also give them choice.

    I have found that sorting classroom library books by genre is best. With older kids they can use the 5-finger rule (if taught to them) to choose their books. With younger children I would give the books a color code and give them a range of colors to choose their just right books.
     
  14. massteacher

    massteacher Companion

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    The way our library is set up is by colors and numbers (red = fiction, yellow = nonfiction), but each book had a number on the red or yellow circle that corresponded with the correct bin. The bins were labeled everything from insects, biographies, dr. seuss, kids, fiction, animals, school, spring, holidays, etc. The "I-PICK" books were set up differently in black boxes next to the library that were labeled ABC, D, E all the way to M. We also had a middle section for chapter books.

    I split the kids into two groups and they would bookshop once a week (the parents were asked to bring in a tote bag in the beginning of the year for the child's book bag which was always kept in the classroom on hooks). They were allowed to have 6 books total (3 picture books, two "readers or good fit books", and 1 magazine). The kids would trade out their books and pick new ones instead of warmup work. This lasted about ten minutes, and if they were finished early they would just read one of their new books. They would complete the same warm up work the first group did the previous day, and that first group would have a chance to go bookshopping.

    That being said..I noticed a few children that would never pick "good fit books" even after giving the directions each time during that time, so some kids may need constant guidance. However, I usually spent that time with the kids doing warmup work that needed extra help. The kids were very self sufficient.

    We definitely had a few lessons in the beginning of the year as to how to treat books, place them back in the correct book bins (binders faced out), handle them carefully, etc.

    **ALSO--considering having a "classroom librarian". I introduced this in the middle/end of the year, but will definitely start in October of next year. Once a week a new child (or children) are picked. The kids LOVE it. They get a special lunch with the teacher, and we brainstormed together jobs for the librarian to do. The jobs ranged from putting the books away in the "Lost and Found", sorting books and putting them back in the right spot, making sure all the bindings were out, making special announcements, organizing the bookbags, etc. They were able to do this job after they were finished with assignments. The next week, the previous librarian would come to lunch along with the new librarian and train the new librarian.

    Good luck! Overall it worked really well..I will just try and teach more to picking good fit books and be more aware of making sure that they have them in their bookbags.
     
  15. flyingmickey

    flyingmickey Rookie

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2009
    Messages:
    67
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Daily 5

    My kids each had a bin as well. The bins were supposed to fit into a bookcase but most ended up on the floor at the front of the room because the books were too big.

    They had a combination of books. I picked levelled books and they picked books. I generally gave everyone 6 books although my lowest readers did get more. The school I was at had LOTS of levelled books.

    They were allowed to pick every morning during my Morning Activity time which lasted the first 10 minutes of the day. When I changed out the levelled books I also got them to change all their picked books.

    When I read with them they had to read the levelled books. If I noticed kids picking books that were too difficult then I guided them towards something different.

    When we went to the library I would let them pick out books for me to sign out and put in their book bin.

    I loved doing Daily 5 but I'm now going to Kindergarten and I haven't decided what I'm going to do.
     
  16. jteachette

    jteachette Comrade

    Joined:
    May 15, 2010
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    You might want to put a limit on how many books they can take, especially if you have a small classroom library.
     
  17. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 29, 2011

    Yes I will make sure they have a limit.


    Is it really that important that I have separate bins in my library that they choose from? why couldn't they just go through my whole library and pick?
     
  18. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 30, 2011

    They really could just use your library to pick books, you'll just need to make sure that it is organized and easy to find what they are looking for. You'll probably want it leveled in some way so that they are picking books close to their level.

    You'll also really need to teach putting books away or get used to shelving books if you give them the whole library to choose from.
     
  19. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 30, 2011

    Yes I already go over the library pretty well. Have not had many problems.
    Now one more thing I need to work on is how to level my books.

    Would it be something like blue stickers mean lower level books, yellow sticker, on grade level books, and green higher level?

    I really think that would be way too much for me to do. I have so many books in my library. Even if I just took some out and labeled it would still be a lot.

    Maybe the idea of passing baskets to each table like someone mentioned earlier might work better.
     
  20. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 30, 2011

    I've slowly worked on labeling mine. As I teach older kids, I use lexile levels. I just write the books lexile level and the genre of book on a sticker. It takes time, but start with one basket.

    I think until you get the books labeled, you'll probably want to at least provide the students somewhere to start (unless most of your books are about the same level). Or try the pass a basket until you really teach your students how to pick books.
     
  21. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2005
    Messages:
    1,189
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 30, 2011

    These are such great ideas. I am thinking of implementing The Daily 5 next year for my 3rd graders. I would love to see pictures of your libraries to get some more ideas.

    Thanks!
     
  22. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 11, 2011

    Re-reading this thread to try to wrap my brain around this. I still can not see how I am going to let my kids pick their own books. My library is not set up for this and I am at a lost trying to figure out how to set it up.
     
  23. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2011

    What would you say the range of books is in your classroom library?
     
  24. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2007
    Messages:
    5,276
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 12, 2011

    I, too, am having problems figuring out how to set up my library this year. I have leveled all of my books by AR level. Now I guess I need to color code the levels. Should I do this by my group colors? (orange, yellow, blue, green, purple) The organization of it has my OCD overwhelmed!

    Last year, I would set out a tub (or two) - the dishwashing tubs - of books and let the kiddos choose from those. The main problem I had was "he got the book I wanted!" or "she won't put it back so I can read it!"
     
  25. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2011

    I wouldn't do this by your group colors because you might end up changing the coloring or something else might come along. I have lexiled all my books and taught my students how to use their lexile range to look for books. It's not the only way to find books, just one of the many ways that they can look.

    A great way to stop the fighting over books is to have the kids keep a Interesting Books list or Books I Want to Read list.
     
  26. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 12, 2011

    Mopar I'm not sure what you mean by lexile.

    I am thinking about doing colors as well. Colors by reading level. There are always groups of kids (our district does DRA) that are at the same level so I was thinking all level 3 students would go to green stickers and I would put green stickers on their book bins. Then all level 6 kids would go to red stickers at bin.

    Seems to work in my mind but again I have not done this before.
     
  27. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 13, 2011

    We use lexile levels for many things in our school (even our school library is ordered this way) and the common core standards refer to them as well. If I hadn't already lexiled my books, I don't know if I would after yesterdays training (we are looking for new measures of leveling books).

    I like the DRA based leveling. Your district will most likely keep using these and the levels shouldn't change.
     
  28. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2009
    Messages:
    476
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2011

    My mom was nice enough to label all of my books based on AR levels (correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't this very similar to lexile level?). She wrote the level on the inside cover of the book along with how many points it was worth in the AR system.

    My new school does not use AR but it doesn't hurt to still have that in there. It's not as though I'm going to cross all of that out now.

    My new school seems to be very much into teaching the students how to evaluate books on their own instead of using a "level" since in the "real world" they will need to evaluate good fit books without this info.

    I hope to have volunteers in my room beginning around October to help listen to students read or provide a more consistent "listen to reading" option. I really like the idea that they can help oversee student choices.

    My classroom library is set up by "genre" loosely. I really like the idea of having a color-coded or numbered system. At this point, it's too much for me to take on but perhaps it would be a great idea to work on over winter or summer break. The readers I inherited are all leveled and I've worked on organizing those on our cart. I do plan on pulling out a few titles for students based on their "level" and letting them choose a few for their book bag at each teacher conference. This way I'm assured that these books are in their lexile level and I'll be able to better prepare for those conferences (find specific examples for their goal) if need be.

    GREAT DISCUSSION!
     
  29. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Aug 14, 2011

    We use AR, so my kids know how to find books in their reading level. I also teach kids the 5-finger method (randomly open to one page--as you read, put up one finger for each word you can't figure out--if you get to 5, it might be too hard for right now).
     
  30. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2011

    I have no idea what AR is. I do not think my county does this. I wonder if its one or the other. AR or DRA?
     
  31. mopar

    mopar Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    10,924
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2011

    AR is different than DRA. AR has leveled the books. Students read a book and then take a quiz on the computer. As the students do well on the quizzes, their AR level changes.

    Many schools use both AR and DRA.
     
  32. VANewbie

    VANewbie Devotee

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    1,141
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 14, 2011

    Oh ok. I think I had to do a practicum at a school that did AR. I guess I just did not know the name of it. Wonder if that is the next thing to come down at my school.
     
  33. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2004
    Messages:
    2,397
    Likes Received:
    4

    Aug 14, 2011

    I don't know--it seems like it's headed on its way out in many places. You can use any system--if you already use DRA levels or whatever I would use those. Then you can teach your kids how to locate books within those. My library was already sorted by genre, so rather than resorting by level, I just taught the kids to look inside the cover.
     
  34. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 14, 2011

    Doesn't labeling a library by level defeat the purpose of teaching children to pick good-fit books?

    Here is a description of how the sisters label books from the member side of their site. I know it's long, but it's very helpful!

    When we set up our classrooms each fall, one of the spaces which require thoughtful consideration is the classroom library or 'den'. The way we plan for its use can mean the difference between a space where children independently find, read and return good fit books, or a space that becomes an eyesore which requires constant management from us. The classroom library can function as the heart of the room, or its Achilles heel.

    For years we grappled with the 'perfect' way to organize our classroom libraries. Once we found the location for our den that we loved, we battled with the most efficient way to organize and display the books. Each fall began with what appeared to be a beautiful, organized classroom library. However, students either couldn't find the books they were looking for, leaving the library virtually untouched, or they returned books in such a haphazard way that the library quickly became a disorganized disaster. Soon we fell back into the pattern of nagging, cajoling, and being overwhelmed with the management of the classroom library. Summer rolled around again and we'd be back in our classrooms, sweaty, dusty and back to the drawing board looking for a better way. Should we organize by author and genre? Maybe the kids should organize it so they would be more invested in the care and management.

    A few years back, we sat amongst our piles of books and decided that leveling the library would be the final answer to our organizational woes. Each book was carefully leveled and placed in a tub. We eagerly anticipated the ease with which our students would find a good fit book, and how simple it would be for students to return them. However, it wasn't long before our hopes were shattered. Students couldn't find topics they were interested in and still failed to replace them in the correct tubs.

    The final impetus for change came when Pedro joined our class. Pedro was a struggling reader who had few, if any, books at home. His supportive mom really listened when we explained how critical it was that he be reading at home and to take him to our beautiful local public library. We couldn't wait to see what he checked out. We were shocked when he returned empty handed. He informed us that there were tons of books there, but he couldn't find a book because there was no "red tub". Pedro's only experience with classroom libraries had been leveled. Talk about an "ah-ha" moment! In our effort to simplify our library so students could readily find books at their level, we had neglected to empower and teach our students how to pick a book that was a good fit for them.

    It was at the end of this particularly frustrating "den day" that we went to our dear friend, amazing teacher, book expert, and at that time librarian, Lori. We threw up our hands telling her we just weren't going to make it another day with our kids and these books organized this way! She listened, and replied with a confident, "We can fix this. I'll help. But you have to trust me." She dropped what she was doing, followed us into our classroom, and began to dismantle the den.

    Being a librarian, she understood the value of weeding. So we began going through every book asking the tough question, "Is this book worthy of being in the room?" Books that were really out of date, unappealing, or had severe wear went into a "to donate" pile. She assured us that keeping books students never chose was one reason it was hard for them to find books they were interested in. We will admit that this was HARD! We'd say, "But we loved that book when we were little," or "That was my daughter's favorite book when she was 4!" She'd ask, "Does anyone EVER look at this book?" to which we'd say a resigned and pouty, "No." and into the donate pile it would go.

    She explained that level wasn't as important as topic. If a student loved dinosaurs, dogs, sports, etc., they should be able to go directly to their topic of interest and browse within it to find a good fit book. So, all the keepers were put into assorted piles according to subject, genre, and author. After every book had been assigned a pile, one of us sat at the computer and opened an Excel sheet, typing in the name of each pile as it was called out. "Farm, Frogs, Friends, Eric Carle, Kevin Henkes, Magic Tree House, Junie B. Jones, Mystery, etc." The Excel sheet became the table of contents for our newly organized library!

    Upon completion of the Excel sheet we placed each pile of books into a tub or basket and added a temporary sticky note label. The tubs were put back into the den based on frequency of use and popularity instead of alphabetical order. For example, non-fiction animal books are always a favorite in our room, so that tub was placed on the shelf that provided easy access. The same was true for Magic Tree House and Junie B. Jones books. Each tub was assigned a number, which was recorded on the Excel sheet. Lori also records the quantity of books in each tub on her sheet. She can look at her document to help her determine what areas need additions before purchasing books.

    We made labels for each tub showing the tubs title, a corresponding picture and its number. A small sticker with the tub's number was placed on the back top middle of each book in the tub. Lori promised our kids would be able to maintain the organizational structure without our assistance, and she was right. Even our youngest students, who couldn't remember where they found the frog book, could look at the back of their book and match the number 10 to tub 10.

    Our den is cozy, organized, functional, and easily maintained by students. Now, after we teach our children the I Pick Good Fit Books lesson, they eagerly head to a tub of interest and browse through the books to find one they can read and understand. We sigh with pleasure and watch them, amazed.

    Lori has a friend who is returning to the classroom after being a specialist for a few years. They followed the same procedure described above, but left the labeling and numbering for a community building activity. They plan to have an "library workshop" in which students with excellent printing will write the tub labels, students who love to draw will do a corresponding illustration, and the boys and girls who don't like either will supply the numbered stickers to the back of each book. Everyone will have an important job to do and can do it at their own pace. They can't wait to see how it goes.
     
  35. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    4,212
    Likes Received:
    8

    Aug 14, 2011

    Now, for what I do! Each student has his/her own book bin. Like a previous poster said, I have students book shop as part of their morning work. When they are finished, they read independently. Sometimes they do not need to book shop, but students who read lower level books need to shop more frequently. I used to have a schedule, where each child would shop one day a week, but they would get bored having the same books for an entire week.

    The kids know when they need to shop. Sometimes they chose a book and realized that they didn't really like it. Or that it was too difficult. Or they read it in 3 minutes. So, I like giving them the opportunity to shop every day. The only problem I had is that some kids hold on to certain books for a long time (Fly Guy books!). However, the other kids would let me know, so I would just tell that child they could have the book for one more day.
     
  36. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Messages:
    2,042
    Likes Received:
    1

    Aug 29, 2011

    While this is the first year I am doing daily 5, I have had kids pick books for years. My book bins are labled by author, topic, or level depending on the books. Kids are assigned a day to pick books as a part of morning routine. I typically have a group M-TH. F is an extra day for kids who may have been absent or a flow over day for short weeks.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. futuremathsprof,
  2. vickilyn,
  3. TeacherNY,
  4. miss-m
Total: 555 (members: 5, guests: 528, robots: 22)
test