Annoyed

Discussion in 'General Education' started by StarsofTommorow, Aug 31, 2014.

  1. StarsofTommorow

    StarsofTommorow Companion

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    Aug 31, 2014

    Ok...so I know a lot of vet teachers are here. As a first years as a K or Pre-K teacher how did you deal with the para who has been at the school for 10 plus years. Some who constantly tell you how others did their job, and what needs to be done. Mines is helpful, but can been annoying.

    One thing I plan to do is to give her a weekly plan with her daily responsibilities. Everything else, I WILL take care off. She use to interrupt me while giving directions, until I told her they need to her MY voice. Some changes have been mad. Just wanted to open the discussion.
     
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  3. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    The advantage you have is that you are not afraid to speak up and instruct your para. If you continue to show firm, positive interactions with the para, you should be on the way to a successful year.

    I would just brush off the comments about previous teachers. Listen to the comments, and if they don't fit in your plan, just ignore them.
     
  4. StarsofTommorow

    StarsofTommorow Companion

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    Thanks...yeah I already did the intern thing and busted my butt for my degree and certification. I don't know it all but the last thing I need is advice from anyone other than the principal, supervisor or mentor. I am the one who gets evaluated which is why I get annoyed. It's all on me at the end of the day.
     
  5. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I get how being compared to someone else can be annoying especially when you're new, but this may not be the Para's intention.

    Since you are brand new and your Para has at least 10 years in the game, maybe she is trying to help you avoid some of the pitfalls new teachers fall into. You sound defensive, like you don't think you can learn anything from her. IF you don't want to learn from her, that's one thing; but, she may have some good advice about the inner-workings of your school/job ... or, she may not.

    You can tell her to back off but be careful because you might need/want her help and advice later on ... and then you may be left struggling all on your own.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 31, 2014

    Continue to be assertive. Use the broken record technique.

    I might also suggest that you keep an open mind about her suggestions. She might be trying to help you avoid reinventing the proverbial wheel, and some of what she tells you might be useful. Don't discount everything she says just because you "busted your butt for your degree and certification".

    Also, *mine, not mines.
     
  7. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    So the para and her experience is beneath you?

    I have learned tremendously through the years from almost everyone I have worked with...even students and student teachers. I try to have an open mind and take advice that I consider worthwhile from everyone.
     
  8. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I'll put it in a somewhat milder way that swansong did. You are the teacher in the room, your para is the para... but your para has seen it done for a long time, and knows the kids and the school. You should have final say... but you should also value her experience and advice.

    There's a pretty good chance that your administrators are also going to talk to her about her thoughts on the classroom, so... there's that, too.
     
  9. StarsofTommorow

    StarsofTommorow Companion

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    Thanks for the advice you all. Administration can ultimately on judge on what THEY see. I really think she thinks she is the teacher. I guess it just feels cramped sometimes.
     
  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Aug 31, 2014

    Good luck with it in any case. Sometimes the working conditions you have to do your job in won't be ideal, but since you're going to be working with her for the rest of the year, it would be wise to find a solution that won't make working with her awkward for the remainder of your time with her.

    I find that if you have someone who constantly gives you advice that you don't really want, a polite, "Thank you. I will take that under consideration," followed by continuing with what you think is the best course of action usually gets the hint across to most people. In my experience they will reduce the amount of unprompted advice they give.

    But do seriously consider her advice. I would have loved for my parapro to have given me advice my first year, but she usually withheld to let me develop on my own.
     
  11. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I think that you might be in for a rude awakening....
     
  12. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    I understand how you feel. I think giving her the weekly plans is good. I was thinking of doing that in my situation. In my situation there are interuptions in the middle of my teaching regarding how things were done before.
    The para may have good ideas. (Just as the one I work with may have good ideas). But there is that fine line between controlling and helping. Good luck
     
  13. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    When I started this job last year, my para had been there for 20 years. She was (and still is) extremely helpful to me. She always made suggestions in a really respectful way, so I imagine it was much easier to listen to than someone who might sound like a know-it-all. For example, she would say, "A few years ago _____ (former teacher) did ____ with scheduling and it was really helpful. Just an idea though- let me know what you decide and I'll start working on that right away." All of her suggestions were spot on.
     
  14. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Yes. That I could deal with. The situation I am in I worked in the class a few years ago and all that was done was complaints about how things were done. Now I am contracted teacher in the room it is complaints I am not doing it that way.
     
  15. lilia123

    lilia123 Companion

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    This is only my 6th year teaching but one thing I can defiantly tell you, is you did not learn everything about teaching from your degree and student teaching. I agree she should not interrupt you while you are giving directions. Just let her know to tell you after you are finished with the lesson. Yes, you are the teacher and have final say, but being able to listen to other suggestions is a very important part of teaching. My aides give me ideas of things they have seen all the time and many times it can be very helpful. Many times their ideas are something I may not of thought of before. Also, I'm sure a lot of people probably would agree that many times administrators are the least helpful with giving advice for your classroom. Not because they are unknowledgeable about education in general but they are pulled in a million different directions all day and many times use "cut and paste" type suggestions on observations or if they are unfamiliar with your classroom really give very little meaningful feedback at all. I guess my point is just be open to ideas from others, you still have a lot to learn no matter how long you have been teaching. Last week, I had another special education teacher with 29 years experience come to me with questions about how to help a child with Autism. This wasn't because she wasn't very good or knowledgable about her job, she just hadn't dealt with many children with Autism and wanted some suggestions.
     
  16. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    You are the one that is ultimately responsible for the children in your classroom. But you would be foolish to underestimate how much a para has to offer. You would be even more foolish to assume you know more about how a classroom functions simply because you have a degree.

    Speak to her about how she presents her ideas to you. But go to great lengths to let her know that you recognize that her experience in the classroom is valuable.

    She needs to know that you are in charge of the classroom. You need to know that she is a member of your team and an important one at that.
     
  17. StarsofTommorow

    StarsofTommorow Companion

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    Yeah no way you can learn everything in college. I've already seen crazy situations like wtf. It's just that I don't need a babysitter. At the end of the day, more experience or no, she cannot teach in any state as the lead teacher. Not trying to bash anyone, I just feel cramped. Great advice. She backed off after I told her to not interrupt me, asks what I need help with, just aggravating at times.
     
  18. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    You place a lot of emphasis on putting your para down, perhaps to build yourself up? I don't quite understand it, but the sentiment is coming through loud and clear, so I am sure you have made your feelings VERY clear for your para. I can't tell if you feel threatened, or possibly fear she could be right, but it seems as if you will never miss the chance to throw your credential in her face. Personally, your situation may resolve itself sooner rather than later - your para may be happy to move on to a classroom and teacher who isn't quite so contentious. Just the way it seems to me.
     
  19. Starista

    Starista Cohort

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    Sep 1, 2014

    When I first started teaching I was with a para who had been in the Kindergarten classroom for 15 years.

    While she was used to the way the former teacher had done things, we had a GREAT communication between us.

    I learned quite a bit from her -- some things that I still use 13 years later! :lol::lol:

    I listened to her suggestions and some worked for me and some did not. The fact that I listened and didn't discount any/all of her thoughts helped tremendously.

    I feel that is what's key - honest and up-front communication. Not that you would, but don't share your frustrations with any colleagues and try to empathize with her as well. It's probably a difficult transition for her as well.

    I hope this situation resolves for your quickly and that you both have a harmonious and happy school year. :hugs:
     

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