And just like that

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Aces, Jul 21, 2019.

  1. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2019

    Yes, that's about how it is... We usually have spring break the week that spring officially begins or sometimes the week prior (mid-March). Then we end school the third or fourth week of May. Honestly, I prefer it this way. I'd much rather be out for summer break when the weather is still on the cooler side than when it's too hot and humid to be outside. Things may change slightly moving forward though. Our state legislature just passed a law that included pushing the public school start date back so that we are not allowed to have the first day of school any sooner than two weeks prior to Labor Day. The goal was to increase tourism profit in the state, but it's unlikely that this will achieve that goal. Instead, it's just messing with school schedules that have worked for most districts for many years.
     
  2. TrademarkTer

    TrademarkTer Groupie

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    Jul 25, 2019

    Well if the AC works in your school maybe..... It's a coin flip whether the AC works in my school building.
     
  3. Aces

    Aces Habitué

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    Jul 25, 2019

    At my other school my classroom was either cold enough for a jacket in the summer or way too hot in the winter time. I used to open the windows in the winter time just to balance it out. And coming back from the weekends? Shew! I've come in Monday morning after the classroom being shut up all weekend in the winter time and my thermometer was reading 95°. I mean I stay cold because of my stump. That classroom had me sweating. And then in the warmer months when they turn on the a/c I told students just to keep a light jacket in my classroom.
     
  4. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2019

    Yeah, we have relatively new buildings. If the AC goes out, it’s usually fixed within a day.
     
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  5. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2019

    Seriously? That says something about your school district if it allows this kind of thing to happen. Not okay.
     
  6. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2019

    Completely unacceptable.
     
  7. Aces

    Aces Habitué

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    Jul 25, 2019

    Poor design of the school. It wasn't preventable with how the school was actually designed. The main thermostat was towards the outer edge of the school, and the heat/air units were central on top of the building. It's castle theory. The furthest edges are always going to be the most effected by outside Temps and the central unit will be least effective in these areas. Meaning that in the summertime, the outer walls — where the main thermostat was located — would always register as hotter. Thus triggering the a/c. And in the wintertime, the opposite was true — always registered colder, thus triggering the heat. My classroom was located directly on the center of the heat/air unit, meaning that that whole area received more from the heat or a/c.

    And because the thermostat registered either hot or low, it would trigger the central heating/cooling system. Thus resulting in my classroom being either hot or cold — along with the classroom above me, and the guidance department below.

    The only way to fix it would be to manually adjust the thermostat to make the heating/cooling system to turn off. But of course doing that meant that classrooms on the outer edge would have been subject to cold temps in the winter or hot temps in the summer.

    But, the science teachers knew that by opening our windows and doors, we could effectively create an air current which would even the temps. In the summer, it would pull a warm breeze through to warm it a bit, and in the winter it would pull enough cool air through that the heat was bearable.

    Donchya know the science teachers have a solution for everything?
     
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  8. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    Jul 25, 2019

    Science teachers rock!

    Still, though, they should have hired some engineers/architects to reposition the heating and cooling units. That’s what my school would have done if this problem arose and we ascertained that the placement of said units was the problem. It’s not like the solution is unsolvable.
     
  9. Aces

    Aces Habitué

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    That takes money ;) actually that takes a lot of money. Which was the main hurdle.
     
  10. futuremathsprof

    futuremathsprof Aficionado

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    I’ll never understand why school districts don’t build cash reserves like mine does. If they did, then they could pay for costly renovations or desperately needed repairs. For example, my school recently spent over $1,000,000 towards repairs that needed to be done ASAP and the costs didn’t even dip into our cash reserves. We just used most of the surplus of money from the annual budget for the 2018-2019 year and presto change-o, they were done.

    It’s very interesting to see how differently schools operate. Hmm.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2019
  11. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    Jul 25, 2019

    You also have to have money to build up a cash reserve.
     
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  12. bella84

    bella84 Aficionado

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    You’re at a private school. Your school can charge enough tuition to have a budget surplus or cash reserves. Public schools don’t have the option to get more money than they need. Plus, there are rules about how certain funds must be spent (can’t be on just anything they want/need). And, if they have too much left at the end of the year, their funding is at risk for being reduced the following year, the thinking being that, if they didn’t need the money we have them this year, then I guess they can do without it next year.

    Do you understand now why schools don’t build cash reserves? I’ve been at schools where principals just bought a bunch of random PD books because they had to spend the money on PD specifically, and they had to spend it by a certain date. Saving it was not an option. Just the way it works with government funding.
     
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  13. Aces

    Aces Habitué

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    Jul 26, 2019

    Exactly. We have to account for and justify every penny spent.

    I actually have the perfect example from our meetings yesterday. Which yesterday was mostly transportation related, laying out the bus routes, etc. Transportation let us review the 89 page document that was submitted to the state to petition for the funding to purchase 20 new school busses for this school year. And let me tell you, if you're a numbers person, it was extremely interesting.

    They broke down everything from the amount of O.T. that was used because of bus drivers having to make extra routes to the amount of idle engine hours spent waiting for next route being loaded. They even broke down the amount of money over the average that was spent repairing busses for the extra wear and tear.

    And after all of that, at the end of the day, the state approved 12 new busses and overhauls on 5 busses the district has but are not in service. The original plan was to sell/scrap some we have but are not in service. I suppose transportation had determined they didn't have funding to fully repair them. But still, the state approved basically 17 of the 20 that were requested. Five of them won't be brand new but they'll be new enough to go into service. That's what we were approved for, so we'll be happy with that.
     
  14. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Jul 26, 2019

    When everyone votes against raising the taxes that go towards schools it's hard to have a decent school budget. I'm sure there are parents who vote no yet still want everything provided for their children. They don't think ahead. Their own budgets for what THEY want are more important.
     
  15. whizkid

    whizkid Cohort

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    Jul 26, 2019

    Same thing with our federal government. Tax cuts or interest rate cuts in a growing economy is crazy. And when the budget gets cut (because all of a sudden the deficit matters), guess whose name comes up early on? Yep, education.
     

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