An article about the teacher surplus in PA

Discussion in 'General Education' started by MsMar, Aug 22, 2013.

  1. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Aug 22, 2013

    Instead of the "teacher shortage" articles that we all know only apply to specific areas of the US, here's one about teachers in PA, especially elementary certified, moving to other states to get a job. 1,200 applicants for 20 openings in the one district mentioned in the article. I know a district I had a LTS position in had over 2,000 applicants for their approximately 10 elementary openings. One of my neighbor's daughters has been teaching in Virginia for 3 years as she couldn't find anything here in PA.

    http://www.lehighvalleylive.com/breaking-news/index.ssf/2013/08/pennsylvania_teachers_heading.html
     
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  3. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Aug 22, 2013

    This is an interesting article. I'm surprised to see someone finally telling it like it is. I have yet to see an article like this written about California, specifically Southern California, though the job outlook sounds similar to PA. The difference is that CA is enormous, so sometimes moving to a different area of the state is enough to get a teaching job....sometimes.
     
  4. isabunny

    isabunny Comrade

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    Aug 22, 2013

    Very interesting article. Glad some states are hiring and those who are able can relocate to find a teaching job. Wish I could relocate!
    I live in the Northern Suburbs of Atlanta and there simply are no teaching jobs here! I have been looking for years and years.
     
  5. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    Aug 22, 2013

    There are always jobs in poor areas, but sadly few qualified applicants.
     
  6. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Aug 22, 2013

    Have you applied in such areas, Milsey?
     
  7. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Aug 22, 2013

    So says TFA...
     
  8. dave1mo

    dave1mo Comrade

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    Aug 22, 2013

    More proof that an increase of rigor in teacher's education programs and licensing requirements is needed, unfortunately.
     
  9. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Aug 22, 2013

    What do you mean by poor areas in regards to PA? Philadelphia is what I'd consider having a high poor population and although turnover is high, it's definitely not a "sure thing" for a job in elementary. Same with William Penn, Chester Upland and Upper Darby, all poorer areas in the eastern part of the state that have more applicants for elementary than they have openings. High school math or physics? Sure you can get a job in the city or the poorer areas next to the city. But elementary, nope, even the poorer districts get plenty of applicants. And this article was specifically about elementary.

    So, please clarify, which "poor areas" of PA have a shortage of teachers? Maybe you're from the western or central part of the state and have more familiarity with that area and the lack of qualified applicants.
     
  10. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Aug 22, 2013

    Yes, there may be jobs in poorer areas but a lack of qualified applicants is not the problem. I work in a poor/urban inner-city district (Baltimore City PS) and every year we get tons of highly qualified applicants with degrees from great colleges. The problem is that while they are qualified, many cannot hack it in my district. Some even quit before Back To School Night. Every year, I see new teachers come and go like a never-ending revolving door.

    As a P once said to us at a staff meeting, "teaching ain't for punks!" :lol:
     
  11. mkbren88

    mkbren88 Cohort

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    Aug 22, 2013

    My dream is to move back to PA to teach in the district I went to as a kid.
     
  12. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    Aug 22, 2013

    I don't know what that article is talking about. Philadelphia pink-slipped 3,000 teachers and 1,000 support staff last June. They still claim they don't have enough money to hire them back. So far, they're figuring on entering the school year with one secretary and one principal in each school. No nurses, no assistant principals, and raising the number of kids they're allowed to cram into each class because they claim they can't hire the teachers back.

    The teacher contract runs out there August 31st. The district wants another year of give-backs and 13% pay reduction for all teachers. At the moment, the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers is saying that won't happen.

    On top of which, we have a governor that has cut the education budget for three straight years, helping to create these crises in multiple locations around the state.


    :dunno:
     
  13. krysmorgsu

    krysmorgsu Cohort

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    Aug 22, 2013

    Honestly, I think teacher collleges need to tell students who want elementary certs to also get certified in a more specialized field. It seems far easier for high school teachers to find jobs, esp if they aren't in English or History. It definitely seems like Science & Foreign Languages are easier to find jobs in. My district struggles to find long term subs with those certs, which says to me that there aren't that many cert teachers unable to find jobs in those areas.
    I also need to say that Latin was an awesome choice for me..cert in Pa & Nj, and though each state may only have 10 to 15 openings a year, I had my choice of districts straight out of college!
     
  14. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Aug 23, 2013

    I don't know about PA because I do not live there, but teacher education programs aren't all that's to blame. In CA they've been laying off teachers, raising class sizes, and cutting "extras" (art, music, PE, etc) for at least 7 years. THAT is why it's so hard to get a job. Because there aren't any. Not because there are too many applicants who are freshly graduated. For the few jobs there are, there are PLENTY of highly qualified, experienced teachers who have been laid off in the last few years.

    It's true that elementary is one of the toughest areas to get a job in, but I knew that going in. My school pushed us to get science or math authorizations (to teach middle school), but I never wanted to. I don't want to teach secondary. My heart is in self-contained elementary. I would find a new career before I would teach secondary. I think people should go to school to be elementary teachers if they want to. If they don't have the understanding that it is VERY tough to get a job, that's their fault for not researching, not the college's fault for not telling them.
     
  15. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

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    Aug 23, 2013

    That's exactly the point of the article so I'm not sure why you're saying you don't know what the article is talking about. Your points are the same that the article makes - too many certified teachers and districts that have budget difficulties and are reducing staff and don't need all these new teachers. This is why some who can't find jobs are moving out of state just to get a job in teaching.
     

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