Am I prepared to be competitive in the job market?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by MrJC, Jul 17, 2015.

  1. MrJC

    MrJC Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 17, 2015

    Hi, all!

    I'm a bit concerned about my competitiveness when I apply for teaching positions in South Florida. I've been reading through the job seeker forum and I'm a bit anxious about being able to compete for positions.

    Currently I'm a student, but I'm a few semesters away from graduation and I'm bracing myself for getting out into the market. I'm a Liberal Studies major with courses mainly in English and literature, and in the Social Sciences, so that I can prepare for certification in English and Social Studies. I started college off on the wrong foot, did very, very poorly, and then took some time away from it; since I returned, I've done excellently, but I'm concerned about the preceding period and how administrators would view that.

    I've been a tutor with Tutor . com for over a year now, but previous to that, no real experience in education other than helping to teach debate in high school (something that helped propel me in the direction of teaching). Previous jobs included security work and charity fundraising, things not directly related to education. I'm also not an education major, so I can't really do student teaching at university (and have a heavy course load for these last few semesters in any case).

    I'm doing everything I can to develop a teaching portfolio that really stands out, with transcripts of student sessions, material I've tutored, assessments from supervisors, etc. Everything to send the message that I'm passionate about my subject matter, that I know my stuff, and that I want to be the best teacher I can be.

    I'm concerned about jumping out in the job market after wrapping up my B.A. and finishing the certification process, so:

    How can I stand out? Is anyone familiar with the South Florida teacher job market? How would someone with my background look to principals looking for new hires?

    Any and all advice would be enormously appreciated.
     
  2.  
  3. Stlteach89

    Stlteach89 Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2015
    Messages:
    63
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 17, 2015

    I always believe it is most important to be yourself. Be confident in your abilities and your passion, confidence, and experiences shine through in an interview(unless, of course, they already know who they're hiring and just interviewing people to fill a quota). Anytime you apply for a job just make sure you follow up with the person in charge of sending resumes to principals for interviews and conveying your interest and passion. I had a portfolio for interviews as well, but nobody ever asked to see it. I'd just briefly use it as a reference for some questions. It was never a factor they considered for hiring with me. A lot of times you get jobs based on who you know, so I actually worked an assistant job and let the staff see the work I do all year. I already stood out when I had a classroom teaching interview in the same school at the end of the year and I was the first person they called the same day with an offer.
     
  4. MrJC

    MrJC Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 20, 2015

    Thank you for the reply! I'll keep all of those tips in mind-- especially being confident and letting the abilities, the passion, the confidence and experiences shine through. It seems like networking and recommendations aside, that's the best bet for standing out to administrators.
     
  5. MikeTeachesMath

    MikeTeachesMath Devotee

    Joined:
    Nov 5, 2011
    Messages:
    1,163
    Likes Received:
    3

    Jul 20, 2015

    Does Florida not require student teaching in order to become certified?
     
  6. MrJC

    MrJC Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 22, 2015

    Mike, the state's alternative certification program does not require student teaching. A bachelor's degree with a passing score in the appropriate subject area(s) can suffice.

    I can't seem to post links since I'm a new member, but from the Florida Department of Education's website:

    The state then offers pathways to the professional certificate.
     
  7. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Messages:
    4,377
    Likes Received:
    809

    Jul 22, 2015

    Without student teaching or an internship, you might find yourself at a disadvantage when it comes to teaching jobs. Being on a temporary certificate also may make it difficult.

    Do as much as you can to get experience -- volunteer at a local school, and network, network, network. It is a great chance to meet people in the field, and more importantly, find out if working with students in a certain age-group is "for you."

    Good luck! :)
     
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,282
    Likes Received:
    749

    Jul 22, 2015

    Is there any way you can do some student teaching?
     
  9. MrJC

    MrJC Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 23, 2015

    Unfortunately, I'm on a very heavy course load for the Fall and Spring to finish up my academic program, which is in any case not one of the university's education programs, so student teaching isn't a realistic option for me. I could talk to some of the folks at the College of Education and see if there's any way I could intern or do something for a little while, something that would fit in with what will already be a very busy schedule.

    I'm hoping that my experience with tutoring will count for something. I can show my ability to teach (even if one-on-one) through that, and have plenty of mentor evaluations attesting to it.

    South Florida is a pretty big place, and I know we do have a teacher shortage in Florida overall, so there's that. I would be willing to relocate elsewhere in the state if I didn't have any luck in my area, if it meant securing a teaching position.

    I was hoping that being a non-education major wouldn't count against me too much, but now I'm a bit more worried...
     
  10. 4815162342

    4815162342 Companion

    Joined:
    May 17, 2014
    Messages:
    211
    Likes Received:
    13

    Jul 23, 2015

    You can always try charter schools as a "stepping stone" first job, they usually aren't as hard to get hired with.
     
  11. MrJC

    MrJC Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2015
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 23, 2015

    Absolutely, yes. I would definitely be willing to teach at a charter school as a "stepping stone" of sorts. The goal is to get my foot in the door and start teaching.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

Total: 420 (members: 1, guests: 402, robots: 17)
test